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#12452 by Groundhound
Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:21 am
scottlindner wrote:There is no preferred configuration for Ooma. There are two basic options.

Basic Configuration
Use the Ooma Hub as your router. This is the simplest to configure, but you are at the mercy of the limited routing functions in the Ooma Hub. This configuration is only good for the basic users.

Advanced Configuration
Use your router as your router, and the Ooma Hub is another device on your network. The benefit with this configuration is you have full control over your network configuration based on your router's capabilities. The downside is you may need to configure QoS in your router to ensure all calls are not disrupted by other Internet traffic going through your router.

Actually, if you have your hub in front of your router, you probably have two LAN's (this is how it is for me). The first is the hub creating a 172.27.xxx.xxx network with the downstream router as its only client. The router's WAN port is on the 172.27.xxx.xxx network assigned by DHCP on the hub. The router in turn creates (in my case) a second LAN for all devices downstream of it, assigning IP's in the 192.168.xxx.xxx range via DHCP. So both the hub and the router are performing routing functions, but internal LAN routing between peer devices behind the router do not go through the hub.
#12456 by scottlindner
Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:53 am
Groundhound wrote:
scottlindner wrote:There is no preferred configuration for Ooma. There are two basic options.

Basic Configuration
Use the Ooma Hub as your router. This is the simplest to configure, but you are at the mercy of the limited routing functions in the Ooma Hub. This configuration is only good for the basic users.

Advanced Configuration
Use your router as your router, and the Ooma Hub is another device on your network. The benefit with this configuration is you have full control over your network configuration based on your router's capabilities. The downside is you may need to configure QoS in your router to ensure all calls are not disrupted by other Internet traffic going through your router.

Actually, if you have your hub in front of your router, you probably have two LAN's (this is how it is for me). The first is the hub creating a 172.27.xxx.xxx network with the downstream router as its only client. The router's WAN port is on the 172.27.xxx.xxx network assigned by DHCP on the hub. The router in turn creates (in my case) a second LAN for all devices downstream of it, assigning IP's in the 192.168.xxx.xxx range via DHCP. So both the hub and the router are performing routing functions, but internal LAN routing between peer devices behind the router do not go through the hub.


I am aware of that problem. I didn't think I advocated the dueling router situation, did I? Sometimes the way we write things reads differently in our own head.

Wasn't there someone on here that had three routers in a row?

Scott
#12457 by Groundhound
Thu Jul 02, 2009 3:02 am
scottlindner wrote:I am aware of that problem. I didn't think I advocated the dueling router situation, did I? Sometimes the way we write things reads differently in our own head.

I can't see where it is a problem. How are they dueling? That implies there are conflicts between them?
#12458 by scottlindner
Thu Jul 02, 2009 3:11 am
Groundhound wrote:I can't see where it is a problem. How are they dueling? That implies there are conflicts between them?


Try port forwarding. For someone that doesn't understand the Hub provides a basic router, you'd be scratching your head. Also consider some of the LAN file sharing and DHCP complexities/confusions that could arise. Again, only if you don't understand that you have two LANs because you have two routers.

"Duel" may not have been the best word, but to me it felt appropriate due to the confusion it would cause if you don't clearly understand what a router is, and isn't.

Scott
#12459 by Groundhound
Thu Jul 02, 2009 3:37 am
Having my LAN traffic independent of the ooma hub prevents file sharing complexities. I can completely depower or remove the hub and my LAN still operates as it did before with no configuration changes needed - I can't think of a way it could be less complex.
#12473 by scottlindner
Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:03 am
I completely agree and am using the same configuration as you for the same reasons. I actually have four routers in use, but only use one as a router. I think that's where we are missing each other on the discussion. Where I meant "complexities" is when people use multiple routers typically without knowing they are using them all as routers. That is where things get complicated.

Cheers,
Scott
#12482 by ben_b
Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:28 pm
Is there even a way to use multiple routers however only have one operate as a router?
#12483 by Groundhound
Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:45 pm
ben_b wrote:Is there even a way to use multiple routers however only have one operate as a router?

Generally yes, depending on the router, you can disable DHCP.
#12487 by niknak
Thu Jul 02, 2009 6:28 pm
ben_b wrote:Is there even a way to use multiple routers however only have one operate as a router?


This is the same as using a network switch(s) with a single router
#12493 by scottlindner
Fri Jul 03, 2009 2:36 am
ben_b wrote:Is there even a way to use multiple routers however only have one operate as a router?


Yep. I will explain using my situation as an example. I own four routers but only use one as a router.

Router
Linksys WRT54GL
Tomato firmware
radios disable
QoS for Ooma
* Only a router, no wireless

Wireless Access Point
Asus WL-520GU
DD-WRT firmware
DHCP disable (ie router disabled)
WAN port disabled (ie router disabled)
connected to network using LAN port only
* Only a wireless access point

DSL Modem
ActionTec M1000
configured for Transparent Bridge (ie router disabled)
* Only a DSL modem

VOIP
Ooma Hub
LAN IP put in DMZ
only connected to LAN on Computer port
nothing connect on Modem port
* only my telephone provider


So in my case, only the WRT54GL is operating as a router. It is the only device providing the following for my entire network:
- issuing IP addressed using Static DHCP
- providing caching DNS
- maintaining QoS
- providing the firewall for my LAN (I still use personal firewalls on each PC)
- providing Network Address Translation (NAT)
- port forwarding to my various servers

Although I have not configured it yet I intend to add VPN to my single router.

If you put multiple routers in play with one behind another certain things can get complicated such as port forwarding. So it's best to have only one router acting as your router. In some cases this means you need to disable a built in router as I needed to do with my Wireless Access Point and DSL Modem. I had to disable those. With the Ooma Hub I didn't need to disable it, I just bypass it by not connecting the Modem port.

Repeating what GroundHound said earlier. Having one device that is only a router and your only router gives you the flexibility and simplicity of changing whatever you need on your network with the pain of figuring out how to use yet another integrated device that wants to be your primary router. No two routers provide the same features.

Cheers,
Scott

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