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#56084 by nofeephone
Wed May 19, 2010 6:16 pm
A number of telemarketers have spoofed our home phone number giving them access to our Ooma Broadband Answering Machine(voicemail) and the ability to erase, and even change the PIN. More recently we had our physician's office claim the went straight into our voicemail.

A PIN is required when you access your voicemail from an outside phone. I would like to see this option when accessing voicemail from the home phone(Ooma) too.
#56089 by Groundhound
Wed May 19, 2010 7:22 pm
nofeephone wrote:A number of telemarketers have spoofed our home phone number giving them access to our Ooma Broadband Answering Machine(voicemail) and the ability to erase, and even change the PIN. More recently we had our physician's office claim the went straight into our voicemail.

A PIN is required when you access your voicemail from an outside phone. I would like to see this option when accessing voicemail from the home phone(Ooma) too.

I have my own phone number on my blacklist for this reason. Only good, of course, if you are a Premier subscriber.
#56101 by nofeephone
Thu May 20, 2010 3:05 am
I have read other forum posts where Premier subscribers add their home phone number to their blacklist to prevent outsiders from accessing their voicemail. I am not a Premier subscriber and would like to see a fix without a monthly fee. I am open to Ooma adding my home phone number to a blacklist or any other solution that will prevent an outsider from accessing my Broadband Answering Machine administrative controls.
#56114 by Groundhound
Thu May 20, 2010 6:39 am
nofeephone wrote:A number of telemarketers have spoofed our home phone number giving them access to our Ooma Broadband Answering Machine(voicemail) and the ability to erase, and even change the PIN. More recently we had our physician's office claim the went straight into our voicemail.

A PIN is required when you access your voicemail from an outside phone. I would like to see this option when accessing voicemail from the home phone(Ooma) too.

I think the PIN option is a good idea. Did you actually have someone erase messages or change your PIN? In the case of your physician's office, did they spoof your number and gain administrative access to your voicemail?
#56116 by DTMF
Thu May 20, 2010 6:53 am
nofeephone wrote:A number of telemarketers have spoofed our home phone number giving them access to our Ooma Broadband Answering Machine(voicemail) and the ability to erase, and even change the PIN.

That's a good reason to blacklist telemarketers into voicemail, rather than into the recording telling them they've been blocked. It'll keep them from knowing that they need to take countermeasures to get through the block.
#56146 by caseybea
Thu May 20, 2010 9:40 am
In general, you shouldn't be able to call yourself from home-- I thus see this as a bug. Nobody should have to pay premiere fees to have to block themselves (?!).
#56148 by Groundhound
Thu May 20, 2010 9:58 am
caseybea wrote:In general, you shouldn't be able to call yourself from home-- I thus see this as a bug. Nobody should have to pay premiere fees to have to block themselves (?!).

I agree with the OP that Ooma should offer the option of requiring a PIN for checking VM from home. As far as VM access by spoofing is concerned, it is not a problem unique to Ooma. Google Voice pops up this warning if you turn off requiring a PIN for access from your home number:
Really??

Removing your PIN might make it possible for somebody to fake your caller ID and get into your voicemail.

Are you sure you don't want to require a PIN?
#56154 by sfhub
Thu May 20, 2010 10:37 am
Yes, the part that is unique to Ooma is having no warning and having no way to workaround the problem with Basic service and even with Premier service, the workaround is not very obvious to most users and again no warning.

I think if you choose to opt-out of (a future theoretical) forced PIN access option, then of course you bear the consequences.

I also think it is potentially different between a 3rd party voicemail provider like Google Voice and a 1st party provider like Ooma. Ooma should be able to figure out whether that the caller-id originated on their own network or not. Google Voice, being a 3rd party, doesn't have that information. For example, Ooma can tell when numbers are from the Ooma network and initiate direct connections and/or PureVoice.

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