Something on your mind? Want to give us feedback on something in particular or everything in general? Tell us how we are doing!
#7502 by parmenides
Wed Apr 15, 2009 10:55 am
oompa wrote:Was the Ooma designed without an on/off switch?


Sometimes devices like this are designed without on/off for the simple reason that having one would mean that you can turn it off. Turning this off means no service, which isn't a good thing. A simple on/off rocker can be bumped and turned off accidentally.

This device is meant to be on and functioning. In the event that a reset is required you must manually pull power, which is an extreme scenario. It also means that the device cannot be accidentally powered off.
#7505 by parmenides
Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:03 am
niknak wrote:why would you need to turn it off?
all network equipment runs 24 x 7


Have you been away form your ooma hub for, say, the last 72 hours...? :)
#7506 by oompa
Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:05 am
"why would you need to turn it off?
all network equipment runs 24 x 7"

-------------------------------

I do not want to turn it off. But what happened on April 13 and 15 made me search for the on/off switch to cycle it. Electronic devices are more susceptible to be zapped with voltage sparks, fluctuation when you pull the plug and no proper switches.
#7507 by parmenides
Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:07 am
oompa wrote:"why would you need to turn it off?
all network equipment runs 24 x 7"

-------------------------------

I do not want to turn it off. But what happened on April 13 and 15 made me search for the on/off switch to cycle it. Electronic devices are more susceptible to be zapped with voltage sparks, fluctuation when you pull the plug and no proper switches.


Agreed. Thing is, this is a relatively inexpensive consumer appliance. Designers probably thought they could cut a corner, and they weren't too wrong in my opinion.

A good solution may have been a recessed reset button around back. Something that you need to poke with a pen tip.
#7510 by niknak
Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:14 am
parmenides wrote:
A good solution may have been a recessed reset button around back. Something that you need to poke with a pen tip.


Than seems harder to access than just unplugging the unit.

I have all my network equipment (router, hubs, switch, ooma ) plugged into a power strip which then connects to a battery backup UPS.

All I need to do is press the button on the power strip to cycle all my devices

I you want you could do the same thing plug the OMMA Power into a strip with a switch, then you could turn it on or off from there
#7523 by WayneDsr
Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:46 am
Using a on/off switch does not necessarily turn the unit off. Power cycling can only be done correctly by removing the power to the unit and waiting for a minute or so.

Wayne

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests