This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#97859 by rocksockdoc
Mon Jul 16, 2012 6:14 pm
thunderbird wrote:You need to use http://www.phonepower.com/speedtest for the Upload and download speeds.


Thank you for taking the time to help me!

I see that the first step is always obtaining up/down speed.

Here is the result of a new run just now:
Download speed: 6.43 Mbps
Upload speed: 3.98 Mbps
updown_speed_test.png
updown_speed_test.png (78.81 KiB) Viewed 6703 times


thunderbird wrote:If you are connected Modem-Ooma-Router set the Upstream and Downstream Quality of Service settings in Ooma Setup, Advanced page to 80 % of the Phonepower Speedtest results.


BTW, there is no modem because this is a wireless ISP (WISP) setup so the connection is as follows:
Internet ==> WISP --> My Antenna & radio router ==> My broadband router & switch --> My Ooma Telo radio dongle
(where ==> indicates wired connections and --> indicates wireless)

Given my setup is "antenna-router-ooma", I'm not sure if I set the speeds to 80% as described:
Download speed: 6.43 Mbps x 0.80 ~= 5 Mbps
Upload speed: 3.98 Mbps x 0.80 ~= 3 Mbps

BTW, what exactly does this do? Does it reserve everything ABOVE that speed for the Ooma?

That is, if I set my Ooma Setup Advanced page to these numbers, does it reserve the following for the Ooma?
Download speed: 6.43 Mbps - 5 Mbps ~= 1.43 Mbps reserved for the Ooma?
Upload speed: 3.98 Mbps - 3 Mbps ~= 0.98 Mbps reserved for the Ooma?

thunderbird wrote:If you are connected Modem-Router-Ooma, set the Upstream and Downstream Quality of Service settings in Ooma Setup, Advance page to ZERO.


Ooops. I'm confused by the 'modem' word again. I don't have a modem. I have an antenna.

My wireless ISP provider (WISP) beams a signal to my rooftop antenna/router, which is hard wired to my home broadband router/switch, which is wirelessly connected to my Oooma Telo/radio dongle.

So, given 'that' setup (i.e., antenna-router-ooma) ... do I set the Ooma Setup Advanced option to 80% of my upload/download speed or do I set them both to zero?

lbmofo wrote:I personally use http://speedtest.net/ to measure speeds to put in QoS. I don't put in precisely 80%; I go with a number between 90% and 80% but good, clean looking rounded number.


OK. I have round numbers of 5Mbps & 3Mbps ... but I'm confused by all this talk of a 'modem' which I just don't have. My setup is very typical for WISP service (I'm in the boonies even though it's very near to Silicon Valley). Do I just substitute "antenna" for "modem" in the suggested algorithm?

If so, then I have "antenna-router-ooma", which would then mean I set the Ooma Setup Advanced to zeros for both upload and download. Is that the correct algorithm?

lbmofo wrote:thunderbird is right in that if your Ooma is between modem and router, set the QoS in Ooma. If Ooma is behind the router, set Ooma QoS to all 0. Do QoS in your router instead based on Ooma IP address/MAC address.


I love the simplicity of this algorithm ... but I have to ask about the fact I don't have a modem. I have an antenna and radio on my roof, which then feeds the Internet signal down to my Linksys WRT54G broadband router by a cat5 cable which terminates at a wall plate. So I connect my home broadband router Internet port to that wall plate.

Q1: Is 'this' the algorithm for people who obtain their Internet from a wireless ISP?
A) If 'antenna-ooma-router', then set Ooma Setup Advanced QoS to ~80%-85% of your measured download/upload speeds.
B) If 'antenna-router-ooma', then set the Ooma Setup Advanced QoS to all zero & then use the Linksys WRT54G QoS settings for upload only (there is no download QoS that I can find) based on your Ooma MAC address.

Q2: Since my situation seems to be an antenna-router-ooma setup, I assume I need to set the upload speed QoS in the Linksys WRT54G router; but do I still set that upload speed QoS to 80% to 85% of the measured upload speed?

Note: We can set the 'radio' at the antenna to be either a router or a bridge; but, while either will work, the wireless ISP requires me to set it as a router to protect 'his' network. So, we on WISP setups actually have TWO routers in our path:
antenna radio/router/switch ==> broadband radio/router/switch --> ooma telo radio

Q3: Given that it's unavoidable to have two routers, do we set BOTH router's QoS?
#97861 by lbmofo
Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:14 pm
Since you don't have modem & router separate, go into your setup.ooma.com (ooma device setup) and set all QoS to 0 (disable). Just worry about setting QoS using your modem/router combo if it has QoS functionality.
#97867 by rocksockdoc
Mon Jul 16, 2012 10:21 pm
lbmofo wrote:Since you don't have modem & router separate


Just to clarify, in a typical WISP setup, there is no modem, period.

It's not that the 'modem' is combined with the router. There just isn't a modem. Just like when you sit outside a Starbucks with your PC radio & antenna, you're picking up 802.11 signals from the air. That's what my rooftop antenna and radio does (in essence). It picks up 802.11 signals from an access point. In my case, my wireless ISP provides that access point.

Those 802.11 signals plucked out of the air can be used right off my antenna, if I wanted to ... simply by setting the gateway on my laptop and then plugging in the output from the antenna to my laptop. There's no modem. There's not even a broadband router (although the antenna has both a radio and integral router attached).

So, this would be the simplest WISP working setup for Ooma (which only has two components):
Antenna:radio:router - Ooma radio dongle

But, of course, that setup would be impractical for home use, so we stick a normal broadband router in between so that we can spread the IP addresses (via DNS) around the house (so we add a third component in the middle):
Antenna:radio:router - router:switch - Ooma radio dongle

Which I've simplified in terminology to these three components in a typical WISP setup:
Antenna router - broadband router - Ooma

Given that, I'm not sure if I should set up QoS for this typical WISP setup using the Ooma Setup Advanced tab or on either of the two routers between me and the Internet. I tried calling Ooma at 888-711-6662 but they had no idea what WISP was so I gave up, exasperated.
#97870 by rocksockdoc
Mon Jul 16, 2012 10:49 pm
lbmofo wrote:Whichever router you use to do QoS, give Ooma the highest priority is what I'd do.


Thanks for the advice. I just tried the Ooma 'chat' support - but the guy didn't know what WISP was (he kept referring to it as satellite - which it decidedly is not). So we agreed that I need the next level of support to just ask the question. I'll open a separate forum thread on where to get help for WISP Ooma support.

As for the router that sets QoS, it seems to me that ALL routers in the path need to have QoS set. That would mean, if I understand the posts above correctly, that my WISP setup is similar to what you guys call this setup:
modem - router - ooma

However, it's actually more like this:
modem - router - router - ooma

Except there is no modem, so it's really like this:
router - router - ooma

Given that, it would seem to me that to set QoS, I would need to do the following:
a) Set upload/download to 0/0 (disabled) in Ooma Setup Advanced
b) Set QoS upload only in the Linksys WRT54G broadband router (because there is no download QoS setting!)
c) Figure out how to set QoS in the Ubiquiti Bullet M2 on the roof (I've never seen QoS settings in AirOS)

Of course, this is just a guess. I can't be the only person on the planet with a wireless ISP so I'll continue to try to find Ooma support that knows what WISP is. The chat guy ended the chat as helpfully as he could by saying:
Code: Select allWe look forward in resolving your concern, apparently your issue requires real-time troubleshooting and it can only be resolved by phone with a live Customer Care agent.
Please call our Customer Care Department at your earliest convenience at 1.888.711.6662 Monday - Friday, 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM, or Saturday & Sunday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Pacific Time.
Mico: You can request for a next level support over our phone support.
Mico: Thank you for your patience! Later!


I think my basic problem is that nobody knows what WISP is ... so I will continue to look for WISP support. I hope the answer is that WISP is just like DSL/cable/FIOS but without the modem ... but that is what I'm trying to find out.
#97872 by lbmofo
Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:15 pm
My opinion is that you don't really need to find anyone with WISP experience.

You just need to figure out whether you can put everything that accesses internet behind Ooma or not. If so, you set Ooma's QoS and you are done.

If no, then you'd need to make sure your Ooma gets the highest priority.

Here is how....

In the configuration you have WISPModem-Router1-Router2....

If you can connect Ooma to WISPModem hardwired, do it. Connect nothing else to the WISPModem. Turn off WISPModem's Wifi if it has that capability. Set QoS on Ooma. You are done.

If you have to connect Ooma to one of your routers instead, make sure you turn off WISPModem's Wifi, connect Router1 and only Router1 to WISPModem. Connect Ooma among other things to Router1. Have Router1 give Ooma highest priority. You are done.
#97875 by murphy
Tue Jul 17, 2012 2:21 am
rocksockdoc wrote:
lbmofo wrote:Since you don't have modem & router separate


Just to clarify, in a typical WISP setup, there is no modem, period.


See my answer to your other thread.
It is not possible to transmit data over radio with out modulating and demodulating the RF carrier.
The shorthand term for modulate and demodulate is modem.
ALL wireless computers include a modem as part of the transmitter/receiver circuitry.
It's all combined in a specialized integrated circuit but all of the functions have to be there.
#97884 by rocksockdoc
Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:48 am
murphy wrote:See my answer to your other thread.


For cross reference, this is the other thread:
Where do I find Ooma support that understands a typical WISP

murphy wrote:It is not possible to transmit data over radio with out modulating and demodulating the RF carrier.


Very true.

murphy wrote:The shorthand term for modulate and demodulate is modem.


Ah. I see where you're going. I call the 'radio' a tranceiver ... but what you're saying is that it can also be considered a modulator/demodulator (aka a modem). This makes sense.

murphy wrote:ALL wireless computers include a modem as part of the transmitter/receiver circuitry.
It's all combined in a specialized integrated circuit but all of the functions have to be there.


Thanks! You clarified my dilemma. All I need to do is equate 'modem' with 'radio transceiver'.

murphy wrote:the "radio/router" has to be a modem. ... The only difference between radio and cable is the medium. Cable ... and over the air


Ah. I see. The input to a modem is a wire while the input to the transceiver is the air.
But, other than the input medium (wire versus air), we can equate the two!

murphy wrote:For the purposes of setting QOS there is no difference between over the air and cable.
If Ooma is in front of your [home broadband router] QOS is configured in Ooma. If Ooma is behind your [home broadband router] QOS is configured in the [broadband] router and disabled (set to 0) in the OOMA.


Note: By its very nature, WISP has two potential routers because the radio transceiver itself can be set up as a bridge (no router) or, more likely, as a router (to protect the ISP), with or without concurrent NAT & DNS. A typical WISP setup would be for the radio transceiver to be set up as a router but with NAT and DNS turned off. So there are two routers in the equation.

Now it all makes sense. Here's my summary based on your excellent description above:
1. All WISP setups have a transceiver (i.e., radio) at (or extremely close to) the antenna
[Note: The transceiver is almost always at the antenna to reduce RF losses!]

2. This radio transceiver can be considered as a 'modem' for the purpose of determining the QoS algorithm.
[Note: This concept of equating the rooftop radio "transceiver" with a "modem" was my critical stumbling block!]

3. Given that, the QoS setup algorithm is one of the following:
A) antenna/transceiver/router ==> home broadband router --> Ooma dongle
lbmofo wrote:In this case, make sure everything connecting to internet connects via the "home broadband router" and therefore set QoS in the "home broadband router." so that the "home boradband router" gives Ooma the highest priority.


B) antenna/transceiver/router ==> Ooma ==> home broadband router
lbmofo wrote:In this case, also make sure everything connecting to internet connects via the "home broadband router" and set the QoS in the Ooma. Since Ooma is ahead of everything that can connect to the Internet, Ooma can reserve the bandwidth it needs on its own.


Sorry for being thick and getting all hung up on the word 'modem'! All I need to do is substitute 'radio transceiver' for 'modem' and then I can follow all the existing advice! Thanks for being patient with me and sticking with me to a resolution!
#97886 by rocksockdoc
Tue Jul 17, 2012 10:13 am
One last question (I hope) is whether the upstream or downstream QoS matters?

The reason I ask is that my home broadband router only has a setting for UPSTREAM QoS.

Inexplicably, there is no setting for DOWNSTREAM QoS (that I can find).
Image

Q: What is the difference (to VOIP) of upstream vs downstream bandwith QoS?
#97889 by Bobby B
Tue Jul 17, 2012 12:25 pm
rocksockdoc wrote:One last question (I hope) is whether the upstream or downstream QoS matters?


On most home networks, configuring QoS in the downstream direction doesn't have any benefit. This is because the home network speed (or throughput) is much greater than the downstream speed of your Internet connection.

For example, if your downstream Internet speed is 15 Mbps, and your home network speed is 1 Gbps, once the packets arrive from your Internet provider to your router, in most conditions, your router will immediately forward it to the appropriate home network port since its throughput capacity is much larger than what the Internet connection can send.

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