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#46326 by rwhummel
Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:25 pm
I have read a thread about this but they got me lost. I am ported and only using Ooma. My Telo is connecting to my wall jack so I have Ooma throughout the house. My question is do I have to physically disconnect anything in or outside of the house to safely have the Telo connected to the house. I didn't connect until I had no dial tone from the phone company.
#46346 by southsound
Wed Feb 10, 2010 1:12 pm
If you are not using DSL as your Internet source, it is good practice to disconnect your home wiring from the telco wiring that used to feed your house. Two reasons for this - one is to prevent backfeeding your signal over their wiring. In a rare instance, it is possible another party could actually hear your conversations and make calls on your ooma. (Would require some pretty great errors on the part of an installer, but it does happen). The other reason is that stray voltages on that wiring can cause problems for your own phone experience. Sometimes it is just hum or static, other times, actual damage can take place.

Disconnecting is simple. You will find a box on the outside of your home that may say "phone" or "network interface". It has a part that is hidden to the customer and a part that is available for your access. There might be a single screw holding the door shut. Inside you will find one of several methods of connection. There may be a little cord with a modular phone plug that is plugged into a jack. There will be one for each line. Just disconnect the little cord and you are all set. Some of the new interface boxes have a little hinged assemby with the plug. Just swing it away. Then, I always place a note inside saying, "Do not reconnect phone wiring. To do so may damage customer equipment."

If you are using DSL, then we need to have you do a few things diffrently. Let us know by a reply if that is the case.
#46352 by rwhummel
Wed Feb 10, 2010 1:30 pm
I do not have DSL just cable internet. My house is 16 years old so it should hopefully just have the plug into the jacks that you talked about. I will be home in couple of days and will disconnect it then. Will there be only two wires to disconnect? We only had one line. Is there usually two lines there in case of future use? Is there any precautions I should know about in the box? Great idea about the note!

And just for everybody to see, I am an extremely happy Ooma customer! Easy install, ported number, and a Telo handset that seems to work pretty good. No longer paying AT&T.

Thanks Southsound for the good info.
#46356 by southsound
Wed Feb 10, 2010 1:43 pm
rwhummel wrote:I do not have DSL just cable internet. My house is 16 years old so it should hopefully just have the plug into the jacks that you talked about. I will be home in couple of days and will disconnect it then. Will there be only two wires to disconnect? We only had one line. Is there usually two lines there in case of future use? Is there any precautions I should know about in the box? Great idea about the note!

And just for everybody to see, I am an extremely happy Ooma customer! Easy install, ported number, and a Telo handset that seems to work pretty good. No longer paying AT&T.

Thanks Southsound for the good info.

Some pictures for you and others. This is one of my styles of network inerface box. With a 16 year old house, it is most likely what you will find outside:
Image

Here is a closeup of what you will find inside:
Image

You can see the little cords with the plugs. Newer homes might have a smaller box with the hinged arrangement. Most homes are wired for at least two lines, so expect that there may be two plugs, as in the picture. There is no reason (without DSL) to have either plugged in. I would disconnect them both. As to precautions, the voltage and current, even on a ringing line, will not cause harm. If you were holding the two wires for a ringing line, you would probably drop them and say ouch or something similar, but current is low. Talk battery on an unused line is also harmless. Of course, if all you are doing is unplugging the cables, there is very little possibility of even feeling anything as they are well insulated and the box is made for customer access to this portion.
#47049 by rwhummel
Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:21 am
I am all disconnected now but just one more question. My cable guy was over the other day and offered to spray something on those connections to prevent corrosion since there won't be any current running through them any more the next time he comes over in about two weeks. Real nice guy seems to be knowledgeable but does have some of his info wrong. I figured he should know what he is talking about since they disconnect from phone company and install phone from cable company. Should I let him do this?
#47064 by amoney
Sun Feb 14, 2010 1:25 pm
rwhummel wrote:I am all disconnected now but just one more question. My cable guy was over the other day and offered to spray something on those connections to prevent corrosion since there won't be any current running through them any more the next time he comes over in about two weeks. Real nice guy seems to be knowledgeable but does have some of his info wrong. I figured he should know what he is talking about since they disconnect from phone company and install phone from cable company. Should I let him do this?


I am not a expert on that matter, but I would assume not to do so, copper wireing can be easily cleaned, and although I have heard techs putting silicone to insulate the conenctions, I think your just asking for issues.

In the event in the future the wiring needs to be plugged back in and there is some issue, the telehone people will be more than capable of fixing things, in other words dont try to help out.

Now i can be worng here, just my thoughts.

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