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#39154 by dpnichol
Wed Dec 30, 2009 8:50 am
I have Verizon DSL as my broadband ISP. I separated the billing on my broadband from my Verizon landline, requested to port my existing phone number, and called Verizon the morning after ooma reported a successful port. The landline account had been cancelled (presumably by ooma), but it was nice to get confirmation.

Current setup is as follows:

- Ooma splitter plugged into phone jack on wall
- copper phone wire from ooma splitter to DSL modem
- ooma Ethernet cable from DSL modem to ooma Hub’s Modem port
- Ethernet cable from ooma Hub’s Home port to router’s WAN port

Since I have to keep a physical connection with Verizon for DSL service, I need to know how to distribute ooma VoIP throughout my internal house telephone wiring system.

When I get home I intend to hook a copper phone wire from the ooma Hub’s Phone port to the 2d jack on the ooma splitter.

I don’t intend to hook up my Scout as long as I have DSL. Do I need any DSL filters with this setup and, if so, where should they be placed?
#39183 by southsound
Wed Dec 30, 2009 11:06 am
I think the first question is "Am I willing to do a little wiring to maximize my DSL and also have all the features that are availble with my ooma system?" If the answer is yes, then here is what I recommend. The goal is to separate your DSL signal and the wiring that goes to the telco central office from your ooma phone system, while still using your home wiring to supply dialtone to all the jacks. This also would allow you to use the scout either as a voicemail terminal or if you have Premier, as an additional line. Most homes built in the last 40 years have multiple pairs of wires in the telephone cable that runs from room to room. The white/blue pair is generally line 1. A second pair, white/orange, is able to carry line 2. It is also likely that there are one or two additional pairs, but that is not important. If you take a phone wall plate from the wall you will be able to see if only one pair or two pair of wires are connected to the jack. If there are two, you can easily use something called a two-line splitter to separate the lines and allow for easy connection. At the place where your DSL modem and ooma hub are located, use the splitter to connect the DSL modem to line 1. The splitter will be marked with line 1 and line 2 if you purchased the right kind. The splitter that came with your ooma will not work as it onlly splits ONE line to two jacks. The hub's phone port plugs into the line 2 jack. All phones in the house need a similar adapter with the phone being plugged into line 2. If you want to use the scout, use the ooma splitter to connect the wall and phone terminals of the hub to the line 2 jack and plug the scout's wall jack into any line 2 adapter. No microfilters are required, but I would recommend going out to the network interfact box on the outside of your house and making sure that there is only one little plug that is connected to a jack in that box. If there are two, that means that the line 2 wiring is going back to the telco, so you will need to unplug the cable that goes to line 2 to isolate your house from the telco central office.

If you are a little more comfortable with wiring, you can make an even neater installation by moving your DSL modem to line 2. You can do this in several ways. One is to unplug the little wire from the line 1 jack (the jack goes to the telco) and plug the cable from line 2 into it. If the house was wired for 2 lines, this effectively moves the DSL signal to line 2. Then, at the jack where the DSL modem plugs in, use one of the two line adapters and plug the DSL modem into line 2. The ooma hub phone jack connects to line 1 on the adapter and all the house phones will work without modification. Again, you can use the ooma splitter to fire up the scout if you desire. The scout would then plug in just as any phone would throughout the house.

If I have missed something or made things look even more like mud, please let me know.

Edited to correct my instructions regarding where the phone jack from the ooma and phones need to be plugged in in the first example. The correct place is line 2.
Last edited by southsound on Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#39197 by dpnichol
Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:21 pm
Thanks for your rapid response, southsound.

When I get home, I’ll pull off a phone wall plate and see if one or two pairs are connected. The house is only 16 years old, but I’m not sure about the phone wiring. I’ll also check the demarc to see if one or two incoming cables are present.

After my checks I should know whether it’s worth it to buy any two-line splitters, which I imagine I can get from any Radio Shack.

I was somewhat confused when you indicated where to connect the various lines. In your first paragraph, you say to connect the DSL to line 1. You later say the Hub’s Phone port plugs into the line 1 jack. This would appear to defeat the purpose of using two existing pairs of wiring. Didn’t you mean I should plug the Hub’s Phone port into the line 2 jack on a two-line splitter?

At any rate I’ll follow up on your suggestions.
#39200 by southsound
Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:28 pm
dpnichol wrote: Thanks for your rapid response, southsound.
Sometimes rapid is not a good as accurate after proofing!

I was somewhat confused when you indicated where to connect the various lines. In your first paragraph, you say to connect the DSL to line 1. You later say the Hub’s Phone port plugs into the line 1 jack. This would appear to defeat the purpose of using two existing pairs of wiring. Didn’t you mean I should plug the Hub’s Phone port into the line 2 jack on a two-line splitter?
Indeed! I've corrected my post to reflect what you just noted. If you are using the splitters and have not changed the DSL connection, the hub and phones plug into line 2

At any rate I’ll follow up on your suggestions.

Thanks for the quick detection of my error. I would hate to have people do it wrong in the future because of my error in posting.
#39433 by dpnichol
Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:00 am
I checked out my house’s telephone wiring yesterday afternoon with the following results:

- There is only one line (a two-wire cable) entering my house at the demarc.
- There are four wires in the wall-phone jack in my kitchen.
o The upper left is a black wire
o The upper right is a yellow wire
o The lower left is a red wire
o The lower right is a green wire.
o Each of these wires appears to be connected to two separate screw posts inside the wallplate.
o Additionally the red and green wires have a third wire connected to their screw posts (or at least to one of their screw posts)

Considering this setup, does it appear that I might be able to use a couple of two-line splitters to isolate the telephones from the incoming DSL signal?

Since the DSL is apparently running on Line 1, would I have to connect the corded phones and the line from the ooma Hub’s Phone port to the Line 2 jack on the two-line splitter.

If I also wanted to hook up my Scout, I guess I would have to connect it and the Hub’s Wall port to Line 2 of a splitter, is that right?

Since only Line 1 is receiving a signal from Verizon, may I safely assume that the Line 2 ports on the splitter(s) are safe from potentially harmful Verizon signals?

Right now I have a cordless base station hooked up to my ooma Hub, so we have three cordless handsets scattered throughout the house with no need to connect anything (other than the DSL modem) to the house telephone wiring. As this house is currently on the market, I am reluctant to spend too much just to be able to use corded phones and my ooma Scout.
#39503 by southsound
Thu Dec 31, 2009 11:31 am
dpnichol wrote:I checked out my house’s telephone wiring yesterday afternoon with the following results:

- There is only one line (a two-wire cable) entering my house at the demarc.
- There are four wires in the wall-phone jack in my kitchen.
o The upper left is a black wire
o The upper right is a yellow wire
o The lower left is a red wire
o The lower right is a green wire.
o Each of these wires appears to be connected to two separate screw posts inside the wallplate.
o Additionally the red and green wires have a third wire connected to their screw posts (or at least to one of their screw posts)

Considering this setup, does it appear that I might be able to use a couple of two-line splitters to isolate the telephones from the incoming DSL signal?
Yes, but there is a good possibility that you will have to go to each jack and connect up the black and yellow wires that are probably just wrapped around the cable and not connected to anything. It appears your house uses a "daisy chain" topology which means the cable loops from jack to jack to jack. It also looks like the installer did not expect a second line to be used and took the easy way out by not bothering to connect the other wires. This will be an easy job for a weekend - most likely only a few minutes per jack - but you must do all of the jacks or you risk missing one that is in the middle of the chain. The other commonly used topology for wiring phone jacks is a "star" topology where all cables are home runs back to a central place. This does not seem to be how your house is wired.

Since the DSL is apparently running on Line 1, would I have to connect the corded phones and the line from the ooma Hub’s Phone port to the Line 2 jack on the two-line splitter.
Yes. That is the "free" line and will provide a pathway separate from the DSL signal.

If I also wanted to hook up my Scout, I guess I would have to connect it and the Hub’s Wall port to Line 2 of a splitter, is that right?
Since your telco dialtone is disconnected, you can use the splitter ooma packed in the box (or any single line splitter) to combine the phone and wall jacks on the hub - then connect that signal to the line 2 of a splitter plugged into the wall. The scout could then be plugged into any line 2 adapter jack.

Since only Line 1 is receiving a signal from Verizon, may I safely assume that the Line 2 ports on the splitter(s) are safe from potentially harmful Verizon signals?
Yes.

Right now I have a cordless base station hooked up to my ooma Hub, so we have three cordless handsets scattered throughout the house with no need to connect anything (other than the DSL modem) to the house telephone wiring. As this house is currently on the market, I am reluctant to spend too much just to be able to use corded phones and my ooma Scout.
Should be a piece of cake to make the changes. Let us know how things work out! And have a great New Year!
#39572 by dpnichol
Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:48 pm
I really appreciate all your helpful advice, but since this house is up for sale and I don't want to do anything that might cause a hardship or delay for the buyer, I've decided just to continue using my cordless phone set until I move.

The new house has been wired to allow use of all the capabilities of the ooma Hub and Scout. I can wait.

Thanks again.

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