Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#15253 by Leeway
Sat Aug 08, 2009 2:29 pm
I'd like to buy an Ooma system for one of my son & Dil as a gift for them. They currently have Vonage connected to Time Warner Cable (Road Runner) and absolutely no POTS connection in their new home. Their TV is on Dish so TWC is only feeding the computer for them now.

I've read where Ooma and TWC aren't overly friendly to each other and I sure would love to hear how to connect this so they would be as happy as I am with an Ooma.

I would appreciate any and all advice here. I have an old D-link 624 Air Extreme Wireless router. Can I use that????

I'd be removing the router they got from Vonage (to be returned) which would leave them with only the TWC modem and no router.

If I can use my D-Link please tell me and also how to make it work to the best of connections for them. They have an anniversary coming up and I'd love to get them an Ooma as a gift and eliminate their phone bills.

They also have a wireless laptop which currently has to be plugged in to go on the web and a wireless router could take care of all of the connections they need???

Thanks, Donna
#15274 by ggilman
Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:54 pm
Leeway wrote:I'd like to buy an Ooma system for one of my son & Dil as a gift for them. They currently have Vonage connected to Time Warner Cable (Road Runner) and absolutely no POTS connection in their new home. Their TV is on Dish so TWC is only feeding the computer for them now.

I don't have experience with this, but one thing you need to look into is how the Dish gets its information. I know some, if not all, of these systems require a phone connection to dial up to home servers for authentication & whatever other purposes. There could potentially be issues with this dialing over ooma.

Leeway wrote:I've read where Ooma and TWC aren't overly friendly to each other and I sure would love to hear how to connect this so they would be as happy as I am with an Ooma.

I'm not sure any ISP really wants any VOIP system on their networks. Just another bandwidth user. They'd rather you use 0 bandwidth but still pay of course. But they offer the bandwith for sale and there's just not anything they can do about how you use it really, so being 'friendly' isn't important. What is important though is the quality of this connection. They are using another VOIP system now so there should be no issue but if you want to check the numbers, have them go to a site like http://www.whichvoip.com/voip/speed_test/ppspeed.html and test the connection.

Leeway wrote:I would appreciate any and all advice here. I have an old D-link 624 Air Extreme Wireless router. Can I use that????

You don't necessarily need a router at all (not that I'd ever suggest you connect a computer to the Internet without one). Without even looking at the specs, it should be fine. The only issue you really have in router choice is if you decide to put the ooma hub behind the router. If it is in front of the router (between cable modem & router), the router is irrelevant as QoS is handled by the hub. However, if it is after the router, you need a router that supports QoS. So, assuming this is an older router and does not support QoS, just make sure to have the ooma before the router, not after.

Leeway wrote:They also have a wireless laptop which currently has to be plugged in to go on the web and a wireless router could take care of all of the connections they need???
The DI-624 handles 802.11b & g. As long as the laptop is compatible with this, which it definitely should be, it should work fine.
#15282 by southsound
Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:09 am
First off, let me say this is a very thoughtful gift especially considering the economy. It is like giving your kids a $300+ gift every year!

A couple of thoughts about your questions and some of the answers above. I don't have a lot of router experience so I'll let others comment. The Dish network receiver will most likely work just fine with the same connections it now has. Most of the modern Dish receivers have the option of using the Internet for the nightly connection that tells them what PPV you are using and also allows downloads of Dish on Demand. If it is an older receiver, it may be exempt from the requirement to connect (my 301 was). If it is dial-up only, others have had success my connecting it to the hub.

If you go wireless you will need to check to see what kind of cordless phones they are using. Many folks still use 2.4 or 5.8 ghz phones. Both can be a real problem with a wireless network. I have a Plantronics wireless headset phone that is so much of a brute it will knock a wireless user off the network in the next room. Even some 5.8 ghz phones use 2.4 ghz for signaling so they can also cause problems. The solution? Panasonic or Uniden DECT 6.0 phones. You can get a set that has 4 handsets for less than $100. If they are on a tight budget and have the older phones, maybe you can "front" them a portion of their Christmas gift. Of course, in our case, we normally do this and then forget we have when Christmas comes around. It's great blessing our kids.

Hope this helps some - again, one of our network gurus will have to weigh in on the router. :cool:
#15286 by Groundhound
Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:02 am
If they're getting good results with Vonage now, they probably will also get good results with Ooma, so I wouldn't worry too much about testing the connection. Likewise if they are able to have their Dish receiver work with Vonage it will likely work with Ooma, but may require some dialing tweaks, like adding *99(pause) before the outbound number that the Dish receiver calls.

Placing the Ooma hub between the modem and your D-link is probably the easiest option, and offers some advantages when using a cable ISP that offers high initial download & upload speeds (Power Boost) that then level off to the tier speed they subscribe to. The OoS features in the Ooma hub only kick in during a call – giving the highest priority to the call while reducing speed for other Internet traffic, but when a call is not in progress (most of the time) you get all of the Power Boost acceleration and full tier-level speed.

If the Ooma hub is placed after the router, then the router must handle QoS. This is usually the best for Internet connections that have a fairly constant speed or for users who want to fine tune all of the traffic priorities on their network. The problem with letting the router control QoS for highly variable Internet connections, like cable with Power Boost, is the QoS is in effect all of the time. Since the maximum speeds must be defined in the QoS setup as the tier-level speeds for QoS to work properly, router QoS can take away all of the Power Boost advantages even when a call is not in progress.

Regardless of which way you decide to set it up, there are a number of people here who can advise you how to set up your QoS in either the Ooma hub or router, as well as other network settings to get the best performance.
#15300 by Leeway
Sun Aug 09, 2009 11:10 am
[i][/
I must have stated my original post badly.

1. They have dish for TV, in no way is it dealing with their internet.
2. They have TWC Road Runner connectivity for the internet and it has nothing to do with their television.
3. They have Vonage VOIP connected with TWC road runner.

I have no idea how the tv got into this mess. My only concern is cancelling Vonage and buying them an Ooma. But, Vonage gave them the router & they would have to return it. So I'd give them one of mine but I've heard that Ooma doesn't get along well with Road Runner broadband.

Daughter has a laptop which needs to be plugged in because the router given to them by Vonage is not wireless. I would give them one that is wireless.

I guess I could take my Ooma hub out there and my old wireless router and see what happens but then I was trying to keep the Ooma gift a secret and a nice surprise. One of them just lost a job and the elimination of a phone bill would be an added benefit.

Oh, and what's up with the 5.8Ghz phones on Ooma? That's what I have. I have Panasonic 5.8ghz cordless and they work beautifully with my Ooma system. I have multiple handsets and I am not using the Scout at all because my phones have all the capability I need.

Ooma doesn't have the Dect 6.0 does it?
#15302 by WayneDsr
Sun Aug 09, 2009 11:28 am
The reason the tv got into the mix is because some satelite networks use a phone line to update their system at night.

The older cordless phones sometimes interfer with wireless internet. (same frequencies) I have one that will take down my internet connection in a heartbeat. Had to change over to the new dect 6.

Sounds like a very nice thing you're doing especially since one has lost their job. Hope it all works out.


Wayne
#15309 by ggilman
Sun Aug 09, 2009 12:21 pm
Leeway wrote:
I must have stated my original post badly.

1. They have dish for TV, in no way is it dealing with their internet.
2. They have TWC Road Runner connectivity for the internet and it has nothing to do with their television.
3. They have Vonage VOIP connected with TWC road runner.

I have no idea how the tv got into this mess. My only concern is cancelling Vonage and buying them an Ooma. But, Vonage gave them the router & they would have to return it. So I'd give them one of mine but I've heard that Ooma doesn't get along well with Road Runner broadband.

I don't believe I misinterpreted anything. I wasn't trying to imply that the Road Runner connection was being used for TV. As I stated earlier & Wayne attempts to clarify as well, Dish does not require Internet for the tv signal itself. However, at least on some systems satellite systems, they "call home" at night for updates, not for tv reception. I don't have experience with this but have read about other people having issues. Since many people overlook this connectivity issue, I thought it should be mentioned. They shouldn't have a particularly better or worse issue than with the Vonage they are using now and may well be using a non-phone line method of updating anyway. It's just risk factor of the system that should be considered.

In reality, the short answer to all of your questions is that since they were already on a VoIP system, there really "should" be no issues at all. Just make sure the hub is before your router so it can control QoS and all should be fine. Any other issues mentioned in my posts or the others were simply warnings to potential issues that in reality are pretty unlikely occur, simply given the fact that they are already using VoIP without issue.

For the router, it's actually the exact same one I was using a short time ago before I upgraded. Unless something has changed with the firmware since I owned mine, it does not support QoS. Otherwise, it is a perfectly fine router. Just make sure the hub is between the cable modem & router and the router's lack of QoS is a non-issue.

So, just to summarize so there's no confusion... So long as you put the ooma hub between your cable modem and the router you are planning to use, in all likelihood, everything will be perfectly fine. If by some small chance it's not, re-read the above posts or simply re-post a new topic with the issue you do have to get help in fixing the issue.
#15313 by southsound
Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:26 pm
Since I tried to answer some of your questions but instead added the confusion, let me give a little more clarification as to why I brought certain things into the mix. I've added my reasoning in RED below.
Leeway wrote:[i][/
I must have stated my original post badly.

1. They have dish for TV, in no way is it dealing with their internet.
2. They have TWC Road Runner connectivity for the internet and it has nothing to do with their television.
3. They have Vonage VOIP connected with TWC road runner.

I have no idea how the tv got into this mess. My only concern is cancelling Vonage and buying them an Ooma. But, Vonage gave them the router & they would have to return it. So I'd give them one of mine but I've heard that Ooma doesn't get along well with Road Runner broadband.
I have had Dish Network for over 13 years. Dish has always had an RJ11 connector on the back so it could connect up with headquarters to see if you had purchased any pay per view movies. Lately, on some receivers, they actually charge $5 more per month if you don't have a landline connected. Some of the earlier receivers are exempt, but I'm sure your son would know about this. He may have the Dish receiver plugged into the Vonage line. He could do the same with ooma, with some tweaks. If he has a newer Dish DVR he can also use one of the ports on the router to feed his Dish system - then he could also get Dish on Demand.
Daughter has a laptop which needs to be plugged in because the router given to them by Vonage is not wireless. I would give them one that is wireless.

I guess I could take my Ooma hub out there and my old wireless router and see what happens but then I was trying to keep the Ooma gift a secret and a nice surprise. One of them just lost a job and the elimination of a phone bill would be an added benefit.

Oh, and what's up with the 5.8Ghz phones on Ooma? That's what I have. I have Panasonic 5.8ghz cordless and they work beautifully with my Ooma system. I have multiple handsets and I am not using the Scout at all because my phones have all the capability I need.
You are fortunate to have a 5.8ghz phone that uses only that band for voice and signals to the base. Some 5.8ghz phones use 5.8 for voice and 2.4ghz for signaling the base. I was trying to bring up a potential issue and avoid a problem in advance.

Ooma doesn't have the Dect 6.0 does it?
Not yet - the Ooma Telo (to be released later this year) does use DECT 6.0 handsets and most of the people who have wireless networks find this type of phone to be very network friendly.

Again, I'm sorry if I added clutter to your decisions. I hope it all works as you planned. :sad:

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