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#95298 by coastalcruiser
Fri Apr 27, 2012 5:21 am
We intend to install 10 phones, with 10 separate ooma accounts, into one general location. Trying to work out how QoS and network can be setup to maximize call quality. Couple of questions please....

1) Initially we plugged a single ooma box into our network router. call quality was "ok". Then we plugged the box directly into the Internet connection. Call quality was better. Here's the thing though; there was no network traffic. If there had been it would be understandable that quality would have improved in second scenario. Is there something special about plugging the ooma box directly into the Internet drop, even with light or non-existent network traffic?

2) What is the best way to connect 10 ooma boxes to the same network? should we "home run" each box to a network switch, or can we "daisy chain" from one box to another? If we do the latter will all phones get equal priority (assuming no other network traffic).

thanx!
jim
#95302 by murphy
Fri Apr 27, 2012 6:07 am
Do not connect 10 Ooma boxes in series.

Connect each Ooma box to a router or a switch that is fed by a router and leave its Home port unused.
#95305 by lbmofo
Fri Apr 27, 2012 6:29 am
Also, keep in mind, there is residential usage guideline. Hope all the units are meant for more incoming than outgoing calls.
#95309 by coastalcruiser
Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:17 am
lbmofo wrote:Also, keep in mind, there is residential usage guideline. Hope all the units are meant for more incoming than outgoing calls.


Thank you ibmofo. I just checked that document. What I am talking about is 10 separate Ooma accounts, for 10 separate residences on the property. All they share is a common Internet connection. I would assume this is within reasonable usage guidelines. ??

jim
#95310 by lbmofo
Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:20 am
Ooma doesn't necessarily care how you implement your Ooma. I think they have the guidelines in there to prevent folks abusing their system for business purposes (telemarketers for example; all outgoing); anything over 5000 min outgoing per month will raise a flag.
#95313 by Cyberchat
Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:00 am
coastalcruiser wrote:
lbmofo wrote:Also, keep in mind, there is residential usage guideline. Hope all the units are meant for more incoming than outgoing calls.


Thank you ibmofo. I just checked that document. What I am talking about is 10 separate Ooma accounts, for 10 separate residences on the property. All they share is a common Internet connection. I would assume this is within reasonable usage guidelines. ??

jim


Jim,

If you have access to the ISP (Internet Service Provider) for these residences, you should run the VOIP tests at http://speedtest.phonepower.com/

This will help you determine if the ISP service quality will support high quality VOIP communications.

Then, you should consider whether each residence will have their own, separate accounts with your ISP. If each residence has its own ISP account, then you wouldn't be in the service loop and have to deal with residential complaints for ISP service issues, i.e., quality, slowdowns during high-usage periods, outages, etc. You should also consider the implications to a landlord for the provision of 911 calls services to resdential customers during ISP outages and power outages.

If you are planning on bundling the residential services under one ISP account (and are prepard to be in the service loop for internet and voice services), you should check to see if your ISP has any maximum data transfer limits per month per account and if they have overage charges when data limits are exceeded.

Depending on the approach you want to use (hands-on or hands-off landlord) you might want to evaluate commercial VOIP boxes which have more capabilities for load-leveling and prioritizing across service points, dealing with 911 service across service interruptions (wireless backup and battery backup) and management features to monitor for excessive usage by service points (telemarketing, commercial web sites, ...)
#95317 by coastalcruiser
Fri Apr 27, 2012 10:19 am
Jim,

If you have access to the ISP (Internet Service Provider) for these residences, you should run the VOIP tests at http://speedtest.phonepower.com/
---------------------------------------------------

Thanx for that! All that. I ran the test and we did ok. We have a special situation here at this site. We live in an area of the US that is off the power grid (no AC), 2 hours from the nearest city, and not a DSL or cable modem in site. In short, we live on a different planet. We run on generators for AC, and satellite for Internet.

Now, for anyone reading this thread who has enough experience to KNOW that VoIP is not possible over satellite, and if *possible*, then no way *usable*, we are here to tell you "not anymore". The new EXEDE satellite recently launched by Wildblue (now Viasat) has reduced satellite latency to the point where VoIP is *usable*. We are cheering over here. Our Verizon cell phone extenders (cell tower in a box) now work. And we have been testing a couple of Ooma boxes for about two weeks, and they work quite well.

What we DON'T know is how many simultaneous calls we can put through on this satellite rig. Here is the output from the phonepower test:

Download: 10.4mbs
Upload: 1.84mbs
jitter: 25.2ms
Packet loss: 0%
MOS score: 3.5

I expected the jitter to not be great. But again, it does work, like a cell phone... just a tad more delay.

I am an IT guy for a long time, but since I have been living with a lack of high speed Internet for 10 years, I know nothing of QoS and VoIP.... because I have never had to prioritize voice and video traffic! Looking forward to what I can learn from you folks. :>

cheers
jim
#95322 by coastalcruiser
Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:32 am
Cyberchat wrote:Jim,

If you have access to the ISP (Internet Service Provider) for these residences, you should run the VOIP tests at http://speedtest.phonepower.com/

This will help you determine if the ISP service quality will support high quality VOIP communications.

Then, you should consider whether each residence will have their own, separate accounts with your ISP. If each residence has its own ISP account, then you wouldn't be in the service loop and have to deal with residential complaints for ISP service issues, i.e., quality, slowdowns during high-usage periods, outages, etc. You should also consider the implications to a landlord for the provision of 911 calls services to resdential customers during ISP outages and power outages.

If you are planning on bundling the residential services under one ISP account (and are prepard to be in the service loop for internet and voice services), you should check to see if your ISP has any maximum data transfer limits per month per account and if they have overage charges when data limits are exceeded.

Depending on the approach you want to use (hands-on or hands-off landlord) you might want to evaluate commercial VOIP boxes which have more capabilities for load-leveling and prioritizing across service points, dealing with 911 service across service interruptions (wireless backup and battery backup) and management features to monitor for excessive usage by service points (telemarketing, commercial web sites, ...)


I guess another way to state my reply is to ask: How many ooma calls could be carried out simultaneously with a 10/1.8 mbs connection? This is the main consideration I think, as call volume will be rather light overall, but there is the chance of everyone picking up their phone at once.

I should state that the Internet connection will be used for NO OTHER PURPOSE except for ooma calls.
#95324 by Cyberchat
Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:50 am
coastalcruiser wrote:Jim,

..... And we have been testing a couple of Ooma boxes for about two weeks, and they work quite well.

What we DON'T know is how many simultaneous calls we can put through on this satellite rig. Here is the output from the phonepower test:

Download: 10.4mbs
Upload: 1.84mbs
jitter: 25.2ms
Packet loss: 0%
MOS score: 3.5

I expected the jitter to not be great. But again, it does work, like a cell phone... just a tad more delay.

I am an IT guy for a long time, but since I have been living with a lack of high speed Internet for 10 years, I know nothing of QoS and VoIP.... because I have never had to prioritize voice and video traffic! Looking forward to what I can learn from you folks. :>

cheers
jim


Jim,

We're already learning quite a bit from you and your satellite installation.

Can you describe more about your plans about how you are going to deploy ten (10) separate internet services from your satellite modem? Things like the configuration of routers and switches and their models and speed and how many of each you plan to use to split up your single satellite service into ten internet services? Beyond VOIP, do you also need to deploy ten individual internet-data-access services? Do you need detailed usage logging for billing purposes? Do you need to deploy different levels of services (speed, functionality) to separate customers?

When you talk about QoS, each OOMA Telo box is interested in only its own available bandwidth. To my knowledge there's no logic built in to the Telo to have it function cooperatively within a community of Telo's. Each Telo will attempt to grab as much bandwidth as it needs for its individual needs without consideration for other devices sharing the internet service. So any kind of "serial" installation of the Telos would probably be a bad idea. That's why I mentioned earlier in this thread the idea of investigating commercial equipment with some QoS/prioritization, load-leveling, and management facilities across its service ports. However, many of the newest consumer routers are type-of-traffic sensitive and have logic to priortize traffic based on the type of taffic, i.e., VOIP, video, ..., so it will be important for you to review and qualify the specifications of your LAN equipment to make sure the components have the management facilities you will need. Here's a link to a Netgear page which has a deployment diagram or a SOHO (Small Office Home Office) type of installation which might help get you started:

http://www.netgear.com/business/product ... 116E.aspx#
#95328 by coastalcruiser
Sat Apr 28, 2012 6:48 am
Cyberchat wrote:Can you describe more about your plans about how you are going to deploy ten (10) separate internet services from your satellite modem? Things like the configuration of routers and switches and their models and speed and how many of each you plan to use to split up your single satellite service into ten internet services? Beyond VOIP, do you also need to deploy ten individual internet-data-access services? Do you need detailed usage logging for billing purposes? Do you need to deploy different levels of services (speed, functionality) to separate customers?

When you talk about QoS, each OOMA Telo box is interested in only its own available bandwidth. To my knowledge there's no logic built in to the Telo to have it function cooperatively within a community of Telo's. Each Telo will attempt to grab as much bandwidth as it needs for its individual needs without consideration for other devices sharing the internet service. So any kind of "serial" installation of the Telos would probably be a bad idea. That's why I mentioned earlier in this thread the idea of investigating commercial equipment with some QoS/prioritization, load-leveling, and management facilities across its service ports. However, many of the newest consumer routers are type-of-traffic sensitive and have logic to priortize traffic based on the type of taffic, i.e., VOIP, video, ..., so it will be important for you to review and qualify the specifications of your LAN equipment to make sure the components have the management facilities you will need. Here's a link to a Netgear page which has a deployment diagram or a SOHO (Small Office Home Office) type of installation which might help get you started:

http://www.netgear.com/business/product ... 116E.aspx#


OK. This is actually quite simple to explain. We are getting a brand new satellite dish for this project. It will be dedicated to ooma. It will be our "Ooma dish" (who knows? we might even stencil an image of "Uma" Thurman on the dish as our mascot, as that is who I think of every time I say "Ooma". Ok, not every time). We already have other satellite dishes, connected to a wired and wireless network, and distributed around the property. But this is a separate project here on the frontier, and we want to give it every possible chance to work.

So, to distribute 10 portions of this new satellite will be straightforward. The 10 residences are all in close proximity, and we will just hard wire a home run Ethernet run from each residence to a central location, which will house:

a) the satellite modem
b) a dinky router to do NAT & DHCP
c) the [theoretical] qos switch that will evenly distribute the bandwidth to all ooma telos

There will be no wireless on this system, no Internet access, and no billing issues. The owners of the property are providing the service. Land lines are as rare as everything else here, so WildBlue and Ooma are godsends. Exclamation point.

So to get down to it, as you confirmed my suspicions that there is no native management for an Ooma community, and the idea of plugging the telo straight into the modem is out in this case, it becomes a case of 3rd party bandwidth management. After reading a few ooma posts regarding the varying quality of consumer QoS switches I really appreciate the link you provided. Have you had good luck with that switch (with the understanding that whatever you have done with it is not what we are going to do with it, but if you know it is good with QoS, and perhaps has a means to set the total up speed (which I hear is important to ooma), that would be good to know.

Which brings me back to my question of -- if architected properly -- can I make this pig fly? I am calculating that we theoretically have the bandwidth. Assuming roughly 64kbs upstream speed required for each telo call (a number I got from another ooma post) my math looks like this:

1.8mbs up equates to 1800kbs, when divided by 64 equates to 28.1kbs chunks. That's theoretical 28 simultaneous calls, which is triple our max need, and would therefore be a nice cushion. So in my noob nievity it would seem that, yes, this pig can sprout wings. ?????

Thank you for your interest.

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