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#38393 by murphy
Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:56 am
You can't connect two devices (implied by your statement that you have a gigabit switch connected to the modem) to a cable modem and have more than one of them work unless you are paying for more than one IP address. You need to connect the Telo to the cable modem, The router to the Home port of the Telo, and the gigabit switch to the router LAN port. Then you can connect whatever boxes you need to run at gigabit speeds to the switch. Cable is not capable of going to even 100 megabit speeds so you lose nothing by putting the switch last. You are only going to achieve gigabit speeds between two gigabit capable computers connected to the gigabit switch.

When you rewire all of the hardware you will have to power cycle everything to get it to work.
#38411 by Kevin
Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:29 am
Murphy, thank you for the quick reply. I purchased the gigibit switch to help future proof my home network, even though the cable company isn't quite there yet. It is nice having that extra bit of speed on my LAN when transferring big files between computers though :D The way if have set up my home home network makes the configuration you mentioned difficult. When I built my house I ran CAT 5e all through the house. This was all run to a central location in my basement which is also where my cable (comcast) comes into the house. My cable modem is also located here, and through the switch I disperse my internet throughout he house. So in the configuration you proposed, I would have to have my Telo located in the basement which would not be the most convenient place for it (checking messages would be a real problem ;-). Since my router is also my wireless access point, putting it in the basement would pretty much kill my wireless coverage too.

My cable modem has a built in DHCP server, and says that "The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN)." Why wouldn't the modem assign the Telo an i.p. address like any other device on the network that needs access to the internet? Is it because the switch is preventing it from doing this? Should i be using a router instead of a switch? Is the reason I can't change my MAC address on the Telo to the default instead of automatic because it is behind the switch?

I am a bit of a newbie when it comes to the network stuff, so pardon my stupid questions.
#38412 by Groundhound
Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:45 am
Kevin wrote:My cable modem has a built in DHCP server, and says that "The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN)." Why wouldn't the modem assign the Telo an i.p. address like any other device on the network that needs access to the internet? Is it because the switch is preventing it from doing this? Should i be using a router instead of a switch? Is the reason I can't change my MAC address on the Telo to the default instead of automatic because it is behind the switch?

My Surfboard has a similar statement, but goes a bit farther in explanation (bold text for emphasis of important point):
The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP Addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside of this range
#38628 by Tiger5353
Thu Dec 24, 2009 5:07 pm
Kevin wrote:Murphy, thank you for the quick reply. I purchased the gigibit switch to help future proof my home network, even though the cable company isn't quite there yet. It is nice having that extra bit of speed on my LAN when transferring big files between computers though :D The way if have set up my home home network makes the configuration you mentioned difficult. When I built my house I ran CAT 5e all through the house. This was all run to a central location in my basement which is also where my cable (comcast) comes into the house. My cable modem is also located here, and through the switch I disperse my internet throughout he house. So in the configuration you proposed, I would have to have my Telo located in the basement which would not be the most convenient place for it (checking messages would be a real problem ;-). Since my router is also my wireless access point, putting it in the basement would pretty much kill my wireless coverage too.

My cable modem has a built in DHCP server, and says that "The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN)." Why wouldn't the modem assign the Telo an i.p. address like any other device on the network that needs access to the internet? Is it because the switch is preventing it from doing this? Should i be using a router instead of a switch? Is the reason I can't change my MAC address on the Telo to the default instead of automatic because it is behind the switch?

I am a bit of a newbie when it comes to the network stuff, so pardon my stupid questions.


Kevin i to used to have a surfboard but it did not have a DHCP server built into it. You may have a different one then i did though so here's a question to see which type you have, how many LAN ports does it have? If your cable modem is a combo unit (a cable modem and a router/switch) then it will have several LAN (Local Area Network) ports on it for several network devices (PC's, Network Printers, Telo, ect.) to connect to it. If however it is just a cable modem by itself it will have 2 ports on it, one LAN port and one WAN (Wide Area Network), Internet port. This type will indeed only allow 1 address to be passed through it and as Murphy has said you will indeed need to put the Telo in front of your switch. This will also allow QoS to work correctly to prevent call drop outs in case of high bandwidth use.

If you wish instead to have the telo connected to the wireless router you can do this provided it supports QoS and is enabled in the router. Or you can put the telo in front of the router, in other words your connection would be Cable Modem > Switch > Telo > Router.

To answer your question no your switch if it is working properly is not causing the problem.

Hope this help if you have any questions about this i'll be glad to answer them :)
#38776 by DougInAZ
Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:03 pm
I am beginning to believe I have been dealing with the same problem for 6 months, or about the time I started using ooma. Lately, two times a day the modem gets wacked and downstream data ceases (maybe upstream too), and I have to reboot the modem. Neither the PC or the ooma hub has to be rebooted.
I haven't read the thread in detail yet, so all I can do now is describe the situation here and read further to see if there is anything I can try.

The setup is:
Cox cable > Motorola Surfboard SBG900 cable modem > ooma hub > wire or wireless to PC. I have tried a wired connection to one PC connecting to the ooma hub, but I don't believe it makes any difference, since once the modem is dead, it doesn't make any difference how PCs are connected.

I have never fooled with the ooma setup page, so it is in the as-received setup condition. I've never found that it makes any difference how things are powered up; it's never been an issue.

I'll be happy to try anything suggested.
Doug
#38782 by Groundhound
Sat Dec 26, 2009 5:02 pm
DougInAZ wrote:I am beginning to believe I have been dealing with the same problem for 6 months, or about the time I started using ooma. Lately, two times a day the modem gets wacked and downstream data ceases (maybe upstream too), and I have to reboot the modem. Neither the PC or the ooma hub has to be rebooted.
I haven't read the thread in detail yet, so all I can do now is describe the situation here and read further to see if there is anything I can try.

The setup is:
Cox cable > Motorola Surfboard SBG900 cable modem > ooma hub > wire or wireless to PC. I have tried a wired connection to one PC connecting to the ooma hub, but I don't believe it makes any difference, since once the modem is dead, it doesn't make any difference how PCs are connected.

I have never fooled with the ooma setup page, so it is in the as-received setup condition. I've never found that it makes any difference how things are powered up; it's never been an issue.

I'll be happy to try anything suggested.
Doug

In setup change "MODEM Port MAC Address" to "Use Built in" and then click update. Reboot your modem then the Ooma Hub.

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