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#108277 by rastd
Sun Mar 31, 2013 7:33 am
I am relocating to the UK for my job. I love my Ooma and want to take it with it. Will the Ooma work in the UK to call the US, or does the device only work within the US? If the former then, what charges are associated with UK to US calls?

Thanks.
#108278 by highq
Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:10 am
You would not be using the UK phone system: your Ooma device connects over the internet. The number you have is the same one you had before you went overseas. It is still a US number. So calling anyone in the US or Canada is just as free as it ever was.

OTOH, if you want to call someone in London or Paris, you'd be paying the US to UK rate or the US to France rate.
#108279 by MLXXXp
Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:32 am
Also, be aware that 911 emergency calls will go to a US response center and be associated with the US address on file with your Ooma account. I don't know whether they could contact UK authorities in an emergency.
#108304 by lbmofo
Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:17 pm
As long as you have high speed internet, Ooma would work as if you are in US. Calling US would be free but calling numbers outside US would cost money in your prepaid account.

If the country has 220V, then you'd need plug adapter if you have Ooma Telo (black).
https://www.ooma.com/app/support/if-i-travel ... 220v-power

If you have a Hub (white), then, you'd need voltage converter:
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=709&start=0
#108324 by Hal2
Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:46 am
It might make sense in this situation to keep Ooma going to stay in touch with folks in the US, but depending on your needs to call in and receive calls from the UK/EU, you might want to get another web phone service or cell phone service over there. (People calling your Ooma number from UK would also be paying international rates.) Obviously it would be a pain to have yet another set of phones and so on, but run the numbers. It may be the best way to go.

Be aware that international voltage conversion can be tricky. For some devices, you can use a plug adapter that makes the plug fit the UK socket. For other devices, often electronic ones which may include the Ooma box and your phones, you need to actually convert the voltage as well as fit the socket (more expensive and sensitive device) so you don't fry the electronics and so they work correctly. I suggest some more research on this on the web before leaving.
#108332 by lbmofo
Tue Apr 02, 2013 6:09 am
With Telo adapter, you don't need to convert voltage.
With Hub adapter, you do.
#125585 by dundonian
Thu Dec 25, 2014 12:34 pm
If you want to make free local calls while using Ooma in the UK, buy international minutes or, better yet, buy the unlimited monthly plan. You can call UK landlines with any of these but not mobile or premium numbers (such 0845 numbers). You will have to dial the international and country codes before the UK number though (011 44) - and remember to drop the leading zero from UK dialing codes.
#125586 by focuspuller
Thu Dec 25, 2014 2:03 pm
Hal2 wrote:Be aware that international voltage conversion can be tricky. For some devices, you can use a plug adapter that makes the plug fit the UK socket. For other devices, often electronic ones which may include the Ooma box and your phones, you need to actually convert the voltage as well as fit the socket (more expensive and sensitive device) so you don't fry the electronics and so they work correctly. I suggest some more research on this on the web before leaving.


It's not only voltage but cycles....we use 60 cycles current and 120V in the US, but many countries use 50 cycles and 220V or even 110 - 120 V at the 50 cycles. Had that problem in the island of Jamaica...hotel said they were 110V AC but didn't say 50 cycles. My electric clock was way off over night...ran very slow.
#125587 by southsound
Thu Dec 25, 2014 2:28 pm
focuspuller wrote:
Hal2 wrote:Be aware that international voltage conversion can be tricky. For some devices, you can use a plug adapter that makes the plug fit the UK socket. For other devices, often electronic ones which may include the Ooma box and your phones, you need to actually convert the voltage as well as fit the socket (more expensive and sensitive device) so you don't fry the electronics and so they work correctly. I suggest some more research on this on the web before leaving.


It's not only voltage but cycles....we use 60 cycles current and 120V in the US, but many countries use 50 cycles and 220V or even 110 - 120 V at the 50 cycles. Had that problem in the island of Jamaica...hotel said they were 110V AC but didn't say 50 cycles. My electric clock was way off over night...ran very slow.

Not sure if Hal2 is around anymore. Seems like dundonian must not have read that this thread is from 2013 and the last post was 20 months ago. Threads tend to go stale after that period of time but to offer credit where do, dundonian chose to spend part of Christmas to be of service by answering a question. That said, Merry Christmas to all!

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