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#93394 by leehileman
Sun Feb 26, 2012 2:51 pm
Hi all,

I am using my Telo as one would a home router and it works fine. But my question is this:

Why does the documentation show Modem -> Telo - -> Router (I know QOS, etc., but keep reading)?

Since the Telo does NAT/PAT, serves DHCP, etc., wouldn't one just replace one's router with the Telo? The reason I ask is that I'm sort of doing that and it works fine, but I'm concerned that it's missing some security features or something that would make one want to keep using one's original router. Or is it just that most "Routers" nowadays are really multifunction devices that also contain a switch and people are, at that point, just using their original router as a switch and doing unnecessary double or even triple NAT?
#93403 by rpiotro
Mon Feb 27, 2012 7:04 am
I have seen several posts on this forum that say the Ooma Telo is a poor router. I disagree. While it has limited features, for most people it is more than sufficient. The firewall is basic but effective. I have used many different router/wireless access point combinations here over the years. My last configuration used an Apple Airport extreme as a router. I have used other routers with DD-WRT firmware in advanced configurations. Even a dedicated Linux box as router/firewall. I now have cable modem -> Ooma -> Airport extreme in bridged mode (as wireless access point). As I am no longer running any servers here it works just fine. I have no problems whatsoever.

I think they always refer to the Modem -> Telo -> router combo is because may people have cheap router/waps that cannot be put in bridged mode hence the double NAT. I don't believe that is the ideal setup though it too works for most people.

I prefer the optimum setup of Modem -> Telo -> network to remove any performance issues related to the service. I have seen a lot of different configurations that work just fine. If whatever you chose works well for you, go with it but don't believe all of the naysayers.
#93421 by leehileman
Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:16 pm
I totally agree with you Thunderbird. Very limited. But at the same time, it does seem to provide the basic functions most people would need, especially if you have a separate WAP and switch any way.

And yes, rpiotro, good point. Most people's "routers" now'days contain a built-in WAP. So that's probably a large part of the reson Ooma recomends Modem -> Telo -> Router, that and lack of bridge mode on un-hacked "routers".

Since my modem and edge router (Cisco 2691) are one in the same box, I have:

Modem/Router -> Telo -> Network switch

So I am doing double NAT between the 2691 and Telo, but it doesn't seem to add excessive latency (Sub 1 msec) if any, and it seems like sort of a good security feature. I suppose I can kiss any idea of VPN'ing through to my home network from outside goodbye since double-nat usually prohibits VPN connections, but I'll just have to live with that for now.

So this well answers my question as to whether it was lacking some feature that would make my application inefficient or dangerous from a security standpoint. Sounds like it is neither. Excellent.

Thank you for your input!


rpiotro wrote:I have seen several posts on this forum that say the Ooma Telo is a poor router. I disagree. While it has limited features, for most people it is more than sufficient. The firewall is basic but effective. I have used many different router/wireless access point combinations here over the years. My last configuration used an Apple Airport extreme as a router. I have used other routers with DD-WRT firmware in advanced configurations. Even a dedicated Linux box as router/firewall. I now have cable modem -> Ooma -> Airport extreme in bridged mode (as wireless access point). As I am no longer running any servers here it works just fine. I have no problems whatsoever.

I think they always refer to the Modem -> Telo -> router combo is because may people have cheap router/waps that cannot be put in bridged mode hence the double NAT. I don't believe that is the ideal setup though it too works for most people.

I prefer the optimum setup of Modem -> Telo -> network to remove any performance issues related to the service. I have seen a lot of different configurations that work just fine. If whatever you chose works well for you, go with it but don't believe all of the naysayers.

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