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#88350 by FX4
Thu Oct 13, 2011 7:56 am
Wow lots of misinformation in this thread. Let me see if I can dispel a few wrong notions here.

1. Most home networks don't need Gig Ethernet. Unless you are pushing some serious bandwidth like real time video editing its just a waste of money. That being said a lot of new home routers have it because customers demand it. A good up to date 10/100 router will work just fine. People believe oh my new gig-e router solved my problems so everyone needs gig-e, you don't. New routers have a lot of automatic QoS features built in as well as higher back plane speeds that weren't needed only a few years ago. With video and voice becoming common place these days, home routers had to change so they are internally faster and they recognize certain traffic that needs prioritized. This has nothing to do with port speed other than a Gig-e router has in general a faster back plane.
2. Only a few years ago it was common for home routers to have only a 10Mbps half duplex WAN port. This causes problems with both voice and video. When a collision occurs, packets are dropped.

My home network is only 10/100 and my router is brand new. I push a lot of video and phone calls all at the same time. It works because my traffic is engineered. Also even while running HD video I do not put a dent in the 100Mbps links.

Image

If you have truly high speed internet and really fast PCs and you do something that requires really high speed networking then maybe you need Gig-E. But for telephone service, and video you don't. Gaming where response time is critical or you download a lot of huge files, sure it's worth while.

Now I'm not saying it isn't nice to have, I'm just trying to clarify that it's overkill in 99% of home networks. Gig-E didn't solve the problems discussed above, replacing an outdated router with a modern router solved the problems.
#88376 by Greg4ooma
Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:52 pm
I've had this router for over a year. its been solid.
And it does seem to play well with the OOMA.

tested it hard yesterday. I was streaming a video feed, doing a speed test, and talking on the phone at the same time, and no issues what so ever.

I think a NEW OOMA TELO and a new phone # helped with the issues I was having before. I still have ONE AT&T landline # that gives me trouble, but that's about it.

I knew the router was never the issue.

bmccollum wrote:
Greg4ooma wrote:I have a NETGEAR WNDR3700 router (gigabit for wired ports).
This was more reason for putting the OOMA "behind" the router, so that the OOMA doesn't interfere with gigabit network speed if it was "before" the router. I also noticed that the OOMA stayed rather hot on the bottom with it in the middle, since all internet traffic was going thru it.
I have the OOMA plugged into a gigabit LAN port on the router, but since its 10/100, it doesn't improve anything.
Like others have said, adjusting QOS helps more than anything.

I'm happy to report that OOMA has been working great for me on my SECOND attempt. New OOMA box, NEW phone number....


That's interesting that you mentioned the WNDR3700... I actually did a bit of research on that specific router/modem yesterday prior to your post. So it sounds like you're happy with that unit as a whole and your Ooma Telo performs well connected to that modem/router?

Thanks again for the info.
#88377 by Greg4ooma
Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:55 pm
I dont think anyone in this thread said you NEEDED a gigabit router, for voip or even a home network. . . . . Most of the newer routers have them....

Several of us stated that gigabit speed does nothing for voip.

So, what are the mis-conceptions ? ? ?

FX4 wrote:Wow lots of misinformation in this thread. Let me see if I can dispel a few wrong notions here.

1. Most home networks don't need Gig Ethernet. Unless you are pushing some serious bandwidth like real time video editing its just a waste of money. That being said a lot of new home routers have it because customers demand it. A good up to date 10/100 router will work just fine. People believe oh my new gig-e router solved my problems so everyone needs gig-e, you don't. New routers have a lot of automatic QoS features built in as well as higher back plane speeds that weren't needed only a few years ago. With video and voice becoming common place these days, home routers had to change so they are internally faster and they recognize certain traffic that needs prioritized. This has nothing to do with port speed other than a Gig-e router has in general a faster back plane.
2. Only a few years ago it was common for home routers to have only a 10Mbps half duplex WAN port. This causes problems with both voice and video. When a collision occurs, packets are dropped.

My home network is only 10/100 and my router is brand new. I push a lot of video and phone calls all at the same time. It works because my traffic is engineered. Also even while running HD video I do not put a dent in the 100Mbps links.

Image

If you have truly high speed internet and really fast PCs and you do something that requires really high speed networking then maybe you need Gig-E. But for telephone service, and video you don't. Gaming where response time is critical or you download a lot of huge files, sure it's worth while.

Now I'm not saying it isn't nice to have, I'm just trying to clarify that it's overkill in 99% of home networks. Gig-E didn't solve the problems discussed above, replacing an outdated router with a modern router solved the problems.

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