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#77140 by danlisman
Sun Mar 13, 2011 9:27 am
I think my caller IDs used to pick up time changes from my AT&T landline connection. Now my housewiring runs off of Ooma Telo. Caller IDs did not change for daylight savings and I don't see a clock in "My Ooma". With neither caller ID nor Telo having time settings, how do these things get set? Has Ooma network time been updated for DST??
#77145 by nn5i
Sun Mar 13, 2011 10:22 am
The standard CID string, transmitted at 1200 baud between the first and second rings, includes a time-and-date stamp. The time stamp includes hour and minute (but not second), and the date stamp includes month and day-of-month (but not year).

The following 2 formats are used in the United States to send the CID information:
SDMF - Single Data Message Format
MDMF - Multiple Data Message Format

SDMF supports a single data type and is used to send the phone number for number only service.

MDMF supports multiple data types and is used to send name and number information. It is structured so that new types of data can be added easily (address?, city?, state?, etc).

Each format includes a value to determine the type of data to follow (data type word), a value to indicate the length of the data (data length word), and a checksum. See below for an example of each format.


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SDMF Example
Here is an example of a SDMF message. Each byte is in HEX.
04 12 30 39 33 30 31 32 32 34 36 30 39 35 35 35 31 32 31 32 51

04 - message type word - 4 indicates SDMF 12 - 18 decimal, number of bytes in date, time and phone number 30,39 - 09, September (ASCII) 33,30 - 30, 30th day (ASCII) 31,32 - 12, 12 hour (ASCII) 32,34 - 24, 24 minutes (12:24 PM) (ASCII) 36,30,39 - 609, Area code (ASCII) 35,35,35 - 555, prefix (ASCII) 31,32,31,32 - 1212, sufix (ASCII) 51h = Checksum Word

Thus, the CID string can be summarized as follows:

The message is in SDMF format, consisting of 18 bytes of information, not including the checksum. The call was made on September 30 at 12:24pm. The calling party's phone number was (609)555-1212.
If the calling party's directory number is not available to the terminating central office, the phone number field contains an ASCII 'O'. If the calling party invokes the privacy capability (blocking), the phone number field contains an ASCII 'P'.

The following SDMF string is an example of a call that was blocked. The 50 just before the checksum is the ASCII code for a 'P'.

04 09 30 39 33 30 31 32 32 34 50 12



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MDMF Example
Here is an example of a MDMF message. Each byte is in HEX.
80 20 01 08 30 33 32 34 30 39 30 32 07 08 4A 4F 48 4E 20 44 4F 45 02 0A 38 30 30 35 35 35 31 32 31 32 7D

80 - Message type word, 80 indicates MDMF
20 - Length of data, 32 bytes in date,time,name and number
01 - data type, 1 = date & time
08 - length of date and time, 8 bytes
30,33 - 03, March
32,34 - 24, 24th day
30,39 - 09, hour
30,32 - 02, minutes (9:02am)
07 - data type, 7 = name
08 - length of name, 8 bytes
4A - 'J'
4F - 'O'
48 - 'H'
4E - 'N'
20 - ' ' (space)
44 - 'D'
4F - 'O'
45 - 'E'
02 - data type, 2 = phone number
0A - length of phone number, 10 bytes
38 - 8
30 - 0
30 - 0
35 - 5
35 - 5
35 - 5
31 - 1
32 - 2
31 - 1
32 - 2
7D - Checksum
The following is a list of possible data types:

1 - date & time
2 - phone number
4 - number not present
7 - name
8 - name not present
If the calling party's directory number is not available to the terminating central office, the phone number and name fields contain an ASCII 'O'. If the calling party invokes the privacy capability (blocking), the phone number and name fields contain an ASCII 'P'.

Types 4 and 8 are always followed by a length value of 1 and then either a 'P' or an 'O' to indicate unavailable or blocked, respectively.


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Checksum
The checksum value contains the twos complement of the modulo 256 sum of the other words in the data message (i.e., message type, message length, and data words). The receiving equipment may calculate the modulo 256 sum of the received words and add this sum to the received checksum word. A result of zero generally indicates that the message was correctly received. Message retransmission is not supported.
#77147 by lbmofo
Sun Mar 13, 2011 10:32 am
danlisman wrote:I think my caller IDs used to pick up time changes from my AT&T landline connection. Now my housewiring runs off of Ooma Telo. Caller IDs did not change for daylight savings and I don't see a clock in "My Ooma". With neither caller ID nor Telo having time settings, how do these things get set? Has Ooma network time been updated for DST??

Telo handsets show the correct DST time. New incoming calls should update time info on your other phone devices.
#77156 by WayneDsr
Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:06 pm
I checked mine first thing this morning, without any incoming calls mine was already set to DST. Nice.

Wayne
#144285 by Ryan
Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:05 pm
I realize this is a pretty old thread, but thought this could be helpful to some else (or even to myself in 6 months when the time changes again and I start looking for solutions):

I found it took about a day for my Ooma Telo 1 to pass on the DST time change to my connected "landline" phone. Perhaps I could have sped things up by cycling power, but left on its own, it took at least 18 hours after the 2am time change before my phone registered the change.
#144295 by andyross
Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:13 am
How does the phone get it's time? I have one landline phone with caller-id, and it sets the time when a call comes in. I called my own home number from my cell phone, and it updated to the correct time on the second ring, as normal.

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