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#71579 by biospot
Mon Dec 27, 2010 12:28 pm
Hello All

I have OOMA hub and have used it for about 7- 8 months now. It works beautifully except for one issue, (and it is not good issue)
When ever it is a high traffic internet day or weekend, I have problems with my network "BEHIND" the OOMA hub.

OOMA Hub works flawlessly to keep phone calls going. OOMA hub works flawlessly to pass internet traffic on to my Dlink router, but during Christmas weekend, Thanksgiving weekend and a few other weekends, I get the following issue.

Oh, and before I say anything else, I will say that I am NOT using the internet when this happens. It is NOT MY BANDWIDTH USAGE CAUSING THE TROUBLE.

1. My VPN connection to work stops and starts. It fails, then reconnects.

2. When my VPN connection fails, (no packets in or out), OOMA is still online!!!! I can make and receive phone calls WHILE
THE VPN connection is starting to fail, then stops (fails) totally..

3. When I unplug and plug OOMA hub back in, my VPN connection will work fine for 3-5 minutes (about) then it begins to fail again.

4. OOMA hub always works regardless of the rest of my network

5. Rest of my network works fine almost all the time. VPN works, OOMA works. Life is Good.

6. I verified OOMA hub is the problem by bypassing it and hooking directly from my DLINK router to my cable modem and pluging OOMA into hub. Everything works. If I plug it back to normal (OOMA in front of DLINK router) , it may work for awhile, then it will quit again.

8. If I wait till after weekend is over and internet is normal load, OOMA and VPN behind OOMA both work flawlessly all the time.

I am currently running it side by side (OOMA and DLINK) home network and OOMA both running from DLINK router. It works pretty good, but if I setup large amount of internet traffic, I have trouble with phone calls in and out. I want to run it behind OOMA hub, but what is causing the OOMA hub to fail to pass VPN (and regular internet) through to the internal network when internet traffic

If anyone has any ideas, please let me know. Oh, please don't tell me simple troubleshooting answers, I am a helpdesk engineer for my 3000 desk international corporation and I know how to setup and test simple network issues like this. Believe me, I have tested anything you can recommend if it is simple network testing.

I have moved the OOMA hub back and forth from parallel to in line (internal network behind OOMA hub) several times, and reconfigured everything. It works perfectly until the next big internet traffic weekend (3 times so far) then it starts failing.....


Rgrds,
Calvin
#71593 by thunderbird
Mon Dec 27, 2010 4:22 pm
Below is a “rough” description of what is happening and some things you can think about trying.

When the Ooma device is connected modem-Ooma device-router, you are routing your work VPN tunnel through the Ooma VPN tunnel. The Ooma device will always provide QoS (quality of service), voice over IP priority, to the Ooma device, to maintain a quality phone conversation. When the Internet becomes busy, the Internet bandwidth to your home narrows. The Ooma device QoS, unless disabled, will always maintain its share of bandwidth, so the work VPN tunnel suffers. It is very difficult to obtain the proper balance when two VPN tunnels are involved. There are a few things that you can try.
1. You can try to go into the Ooma device, using your Internet browser, and adjust the QoS upload and download settings, while maintaining good (phone conversation quality) upload download speeds, to try to obtain a balance when the Internet is busy. (You can search this forum to find a QoS setting procedure and starting point for the Ooma Hub.)
2. You can see if you can obtain more bandwidth from your Internet provider. (Still may or may not work without adjusting your Ooma device QoS settings and plus other problems).
3. You can try to connect your Ooma device behind (on the LAN side of) the router as follows: modem-router-Ooma device.
4. There are some things that may have to be configured when setting the Ooma device behind (on the LAN side of) the router, or there may be some mostly minor problems, depending on your modem and router.
5. I’ve developed a script for setting up the Ooma Telo behind (on the LAN side of) the router, but don’t have a script for the Ooma hub. I can post the Ooma Telo script and you can try to use the Telo script as a rough guide. Or maybe your can seek help, setting up the Hub behind the router, by searching this forum, or get help from other members of this forum, that have their Ooma Hub setup behind their router.
6. You still may have to set/adjust/fine tune QoS settings in your router and your Hub to obtain a balance between the two VPN tunnels.

Good Luck.
Last edited by thunderbird on Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#71704 by biospot
Wed Dec 29, 2010 9:06 am
Yes, I understand what you are saying, but I thought my work VPN would not be routed "inside" the OOMA tunnel? I thought it would run parallel, since there is no need or desire to encrypt something twice?

Besides if my work VPN tunnel was encrypted inside the OOMA VPN tunnel, all my internet data streams along with all other OOMA users would have to be un-encrypted and sent out from the OOMA's own servers... It would use up a huge amount of bandwidth.... It would be much simpler for OOMA to only encrypt their own voice data and simply pass all other data to the internet without touching it.

Or is that was you meant? That the data is going through the OOMA device but not through the VPN tunnel?

In any event, in the past, I had used the OOMA as you suggested and that is how it is (re)hooked up now. When I had to work through my VPN tunnel, I had to give up the OOMA phone for the duration and take it out of the loop. When the emergency was over, instead of putting it back at the head, I moved it back behind my router and it no longer carries all my internet traffic. Perhaps that is better, but I just hate it when something doesn't work right. I always want to fix it.

My question (or complaint) is why can't the OOMA deal with the data flow during busy internet traffic days? I wonder if my cable company is playing games with my connection, OR is the OOMA hardware unable to keep up with massive amounts of packet fragmentation brought about by lots of video and voice traffic (like Netflix) running? OR... something else?

I would like to think it was the cable company throttling data usage in order to provide superior service to their own (competing) VOIP solution. In that case, I know the culprit and can fight them to quit stealing the bandwidth I pay for....

If my OOMA box is not capable to deal with excessive packet fragmentation, I will have to leave it behind the router, and attempt to resolve voice issues through the router. I am leaning in that direction, but if anyone has any other ideas, I would love to hear them...
Thank you for your help.
Biospot
#71711 by murphy
Wed Dec 29, 2010 9:55 am
Every work vpn I have ever used was configured to block all external access to the outside world when it was active. Presumably this is to prevent a sneak path from the global internet through your computer to the work network.

My Ooma boxes have been behind my router for close to two years. They work fine there. My network is a gigabit network and the Ooma boxes don't do gigabit.
#74486 by bmcerlai
Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:47 am
Interesting.

I don't have an issue with Ooma and specifically I don't have the issue that you describe, but have done some testing related to Ooma and bandwidth. I have Ooma configured in the standard way, the Ooma Hub sits between the cable modem and the wireless router (to support Ooma QoS). Bandwidth available directly from the cable modem (bypassing Ooma) is roughly 18 - 19M down and 5 - 6M up. Bandwidth available to the wireless router (with Ooma in line) is roughly 11 - 12M down and 3 - 4M up. So, looks like Ooma is taking 30% - 40% of available bandwidth.

I understand that one of the ways that Ooma holds connection costs down is by routing calls through individual Ooma appliances like your and mine. By installing an Ooma appliance, we are in effect helping Ooma to expand their network. Could imagine that during times of peak call volumes (like the times that you mentioned), even more bandwidth could be consumed. Could it be that your bandwidth is being fully consumed by Ooma call routing? Might be a good question for the Ooma experts.

I love Ooma, but it would be interesting to get the skinny on exactly how much (or little) they are utilizing our bandwidth. We as Ooma users should know how much of our bandwidth we are giving up and would be nice to be clear about maximum amounts of our pipe capacity that Ooma is able or allowed to consume. If this forum is monitored, I hope that someone from Ooma will enlighten us.
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Did some more testing - Ooma is not using anywhere near 30% of my available bandwidth. Also, my Hypothesis was based on old information and is therefore faulty.
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Last edited by bmcerlai on Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#74491 by lbmofo
Sat Feb 05, 2011 11:31 am
The peer to peer to model terminating shared POTS line was no more and hasn't been for a long while.
#74509 by highq
Sat Feb 05, 2011 1:32 pm
bmcerlai wrote:Interesting.
I understand that one of the ways that Ooma holds connection costs down is by routing calls through individual Ooma appliances like your and mine. By installing an Ooma appliance, we are in effect helping Ooma to expand their network. Could imagine that during times of peak call volumes (like the times that you mentioned), even more bandwidth could be consumed. Could it be that your bandwidth is being fully consumed by Ooma call routing? Might be a good question for the Ooma experts.

I love Ooma, but it would be interesting to get the skinny on exactly how much (or little) they are utilizing our bandwidth. We as Ooma users should know how much of our bandwidth we are giving up and would be nice to be clear about maximum amounts of our pipe capacity that Ooma is able or allowed to consume. If this forum is monitored, I hope that someone from Ooma will enlighten us.

Excuse me? You think other peoples calls are going through your Ooma device, being sent through your Internet connection to your Ooma appliance and then back out though that same Internet connection?
#74528 by Hollywood
Sat Feb 05, 2011 8:19 pm
highq wrote:Excuse me? You think other peoples calls are going through your Ooma device, being sent through your Internet connection to your Ooma appliance and then back out though that same Internet connection?


I think I read that was Ooma's original business model, but there were too many (including privacy) issues and that idea wasn't used.
#74531 by nn5i
Sat Feb 05, 2011 8:46 pm
Hollywood wrote:I think I read that was Ooma's original business model, but there were too many (including privacy) issues and that idea wasn't used.


I think you seriously misunderstood whatever you read. Unless, of course, you're putting us on.
#74536 by Hollywood
Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:20 pm
perhaps I did misunderstand, but I just googled "ooma" and the Wiki page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ooma said the original plan was to integrate to land lines and route other customers long distance calls through Oomas in the calling area. If that model was still/ever used, you would get internet traffic on your modem from fellow callers that could affect your speed.

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