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#12496 by Groundhound
Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:34 am
To clarify, what I have is the ooma hub serving as a router in front with one client, a WRT54GL router running Tomato. The ooma hub handles VoIP QoS and passes all WAN ports to the WRT54GL via DMZ. The hub's QoS has the unique ability to be conditional, that is QoS is only in effect when a call is in progress. The network between the hub and the WAN port on the WRT54GL operates in the 172.27.xxx.xxx IP range.

The WRT54GL routes all LAN traffic on a separate IP network in the 192.168.xxx.xxx range. This network behind the WRT54GL consists of two additional WRT54G's operating via WDS as wireless AP extenders with no routing functions, two desktops, one laptop, one networked printer, and a DirecTv HR22. All LAN peer to peer traffic is independent of the ooma hub.

The ooma hub serves WAN traffic with conditional QoS to my network and nothing more, file sharing and other LAN traffic operate even if the ooma hub is off. If the hub were to fail, I can simply connect my modem directly to my WRT54GL's WAN port, reboot and my network operates just as it did before ooma with no configuration changes needed and no QoS.

The main reason I run it this way is the hub's conditional QoS does not regulate WAN traffic when no call is in progress. My ISP, Comcast, has variable upload & download speeds due to Powerboost. Powerboost greatly increases speeds for the first 10 MB of a transfer. Conditional QoS allows me to take advantage of that when no call is is progress, as is the case most of the time.

To tie this back to the subject of this thread, if I needed UPnP to pass through my WAN more than I needed conditional QoS, I'd put the hub behind my WRT54GL until ooma adds UPnP support to the hub, but for now that's not a concern for me. Within my LAN, UPnP does work as the WRT54GL does support it and the hub is not involved.
#12497 by Aveamantium
Fri Jul 03, 2009 5:54 am
I too am now running my network in almost an identical fashion... I have my ISP's modem then ooma then router (wrt54gl running tomato) with the IP of the router in the ooma's DMZ. The conditional Qos in this setup is great as my speed varies a lot as well. I like being able to use the full speed of my connection unless a call is in progress!
#12498 by scottlindner
Fri Jul 03, 2009 5:56 am
Aveamantium wrote:I too am now running my network in almost an identical fashion... I have my ISP's modem then ooma then router (wrt54gl running tomato) with the IP of the router in the ooma's DMZ. The conditional Qos in this setup is great as my speed varies a lot as well. I like being able to use the full speed of my connection unless a call is in progress!


You may want to take your Hub's IP out of the DMZ. As you have it now, anyone on the planet can access your Ooma Hub's setup screen.

Scott
#12499 by scottlindner
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:08 am
Groundhound wrote:If the hub were to fail, I can simply connect my modem directly to my WRT54GL's WAN port, reboot and my network operates just as it did before ooma with no configuration changes needed and no QoS.


Just so you are aware, you do not need to reboot Tomato if you change the WAN configuration. It is based on Linux and is designed to restart only the services that need to be restarted, rather than rebooting the entire unit like most commercial firmware does (e.g. Linksys, D-Link, etc.)

Scott
#12500 by Aveamantium
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:09 am
scottlindner wrote:
Aveamantium wrote:I too am now running my network in almost an identical fashion... I have my ISP's modem then ooma then router (wrt54gl running tomato) with the IP of the router in the ooma's DMZ. The conditional Qos in this setup is great as my speed varies a lot as well. I like being able to use the full speed of my connection unless a call is in progress!


You may want to take your Hub's IP out of the DMZ. As you have it now, anyone on the planet can access your Ooma Hub's setup screen.

Scott


I have the router's IP in ooma's DMZ not ooma's IP... This way all WAN traffic is forwarded to my router, avoiding any NAT/port forwarding issues that would arise with the ooma upstream of the router.
#12501 by scottlindner
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:12 am
Aveamantium wrote:
scottlindner wrote:
Aveamantium wrote:I too am now running my network in almost an identical fashion... I have my ISP's modem then ooma then router (wrt54gl running tomato) with the IP of the router in the ooma's DMZ. The conditional Qos in this setup is great as my speed varies a lot as well. I like being able to use the full speed of my connection unless a call is in progress!


You may want to take your Hub's IP out of the DMZ. As you have it now, anyone on the planet can access your Ooma Hub's setup screen.

Scott


I have the router's IP in ooma's DMZ not ooma's IP... This way all WAN traffic is forwarded to my router, avoiding any NAT/port forwarding issues that would arise with the ooma upstream of the router.


I got it now. Obviously I misunderstood. Not a bad way to set it up. This sounds like a really good suggestion for most people that need advanced networking with routers that cannot support QoS. Wouldn't this be the optimal solution for the OP's needs?

Scott
#12503 by Aveamantium
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:22 am
I would think so?? I'm going to test for awhile to see if I can identify any pitfalls in this configuration. If I need to go back to having my ooma behind the router I can always do that as Tomato's Qos works great. Again, the only advantage to me with this config is the conditional Qos, which is only applied when a call is in progress as opposed to Tomato where Qos is always shaping traffic (which is a pain if you have a highly variable speed internet).
#12504 by Groundhound
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:47 am
scottlindner wrote:Just so you are aware, you do not need to reboot Tomato if you change the WAN configuration. It is based on Linux and is designed to restart only the services that need to be restarted, rather than rebooting the entire unit like most commercial firmware does (e.g. Linksys, D-Link, etc.)

In the situation I described, no WAN configuration is changed in Tomato. A reboot of the router would be needed in this situation because it would be a "new computer" with a different MAC as far as the modem is concerned. The reboot is for the modem's (Arris) sake.
#12505 by scottlindner
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:49 am
Groundhound wrote:
scottlindner wrote:Just so you are aware, you do not need to reboot Tomato if you change the WAN configuration. It is based on Linux and is designed to restart only the services that need to be restarted, rather than rebooting the entire unit like most commercial firmware does (e.g. Linksys, D-Link, etc.)

In the situation I described, no WAN configuration is changed in Tomato. A reboot of the router would be needed in this situation because it would be a "new computer" with a different MAC as far as the modem is concerned. The reboot is for the modem's (Arris) sake.


Boy.. I sure have been misunderstanding this morning. That makes sense. Sorry for the confusion on my part.

Cheers,
Scott
#12546 by Aveamantium
Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:12 pm
Just as an update to the OP, my XBOX 360 uses UPnP to access XBOX Live and it is working great with the ooma being ahead of the router.

Just to reiterate my setup - Modem -ooma - router. To setup:

Go to the router and see what IP address is assigned to it by the ooma (should be 172.27.35.X range).

Enter this IP address into the ooma's DMZ (this will pass all traffic to the router, basically taking the ooma's NAT/firewall out of the equation).

Enjoy!

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