Something on your mind? Want to give us feedback on something in particular or everything in general? Tell us how we are doing!
#39430 by bw1
Thu Dec 31, 2009 7:56 am
I once found the Hub with a solid red 1 and 2 buttons and it fail to connect or provide dial tone even after a reset and a factory reset. I don't know what caused it to get into that state, but in order to correct the problem, I had to unplug my cable modem and Hub and then power up the Hub and then the cable modem. It was then able to re-connect to the internet and give me a blue tab.

Looking at the installation instructions for the Telo, they recommend to turn off your modem and router at the beginning of installation. Then to finish installation, they tell you to plug in the Telo and then your modem and router.

Once, everything is configured, the order probably doesn't matter, unless an IP address needs to be re-assigned.
#41293 by sm2953
Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:12 am
We had a power outage two weeks after I got the ooma up and running and now my phone system is not working properly. I can receive calls - hear the caller fine - but they can not hear us. I have taken everything apart and put it back together. Still problems. I can not set a new voicemail message to let people know to just leave a message to let them know that the system is not working properly. It keeps saying that I have not selected anything. I have an integrated router - hub - computer. The line goes first into the router in the WAN port, then to the hub into the modem port, then from the home port to the computer. Any ideas - it's been 5 weeks and I've gotten no help from Ooma support?
#41350 by sm2953
Mon Jan 11, 2010 2:08 pm
I reset the Ooma hub as you described and can now reset my message for the answering machine part. However - when I try to go to the setup website you suggested- nothing happens. I've tried to get to it before with no luck. I do not know if the phone is working better now or not - but my guess is not - since I think the hub reset itself when I unplugged it to plug everything back in. Maybe not - I did not hold down the blue button on previous times. I will repost when I find out. Thanks.
#41452 by bw1
Tue Jan 12, 2010 8:42 am
You can connect to the Ooma setup page by opening your web browser to http://setup.ooma.com. Note that this page can only be accessed from a computer connected directly to the HOME NETWORK port of the Telo (HOME port on Ooma Hub).

If you're still unable to access the setup page from a computer connected directly to the correct port, you may need to configure your computer to get an IP address dynamically and not use a static IP address. You also may need to reboot your computer.
#41461 by caseybea
Tue Jan 12, 2010 9:27 am
The advice here thus far is pretty solid-- start with whatever connects to your internet FIRST and work your way back. The reason is-- depending on your home setup, the pieces of equipment (for example, cable router) needs to provide an address to the device connected to it, and so on. This only works properly if the first device is ON and READY before the next device powers up.

However, more importantly-- anyone using an Ooma solutino *Seriously* should consider a UPS - even if a small one. First, there's the issue of really protecting you from a big power surge (UPS's do this WAY better than so-called "surge protectors"). But most important: With a UPS in play-- you will still be able to make and receive phone calls during an outage if you have a battery backup solution in place.

Imagine the scenareo: Power goes out - either due to say, a downed power cable or a lightning strike, or.. And something starts on fire... that would be a REAL good time to have dial tone.

The main argument against dropping a "land line" is the ability to call 911 24x7. With a UPS in place, you get that with Ooma too- power, or no power. [note: only for as long as the battery lasts, but still....]
#41564 by southsound
Tue Jan 12, 2010 5:54 pm
caseybea wrote: However, more importantly-- anyone using an Ooma solutino *Seriously* should consider a UPS - even if a small one. First, there's the issue of really protecting you from a big power surge (UPS's do this WAY better than so-called "surge protectors"). But most important: With a UPS in play-- you will still be able to make and receive phone calls during an outage if you have a battery backup solution in place.

Imagine the scenareo: Power goes out - either due to say, a downed power cable or a lightning strike, or.. And something starts on fire... that would be a REAL good time to have dial tone.

The main argument against dropping a "land line" is the ability to call 911 24x7. With a UPS in place, you get that with Ooma too- power, or no power. [note: only for as long as the battery lasts, but still....]

Before feeling totally safe with just your own system on UPS, it is important to know that sometimes the service that provides your Internet may not be battery backed up even when you are. We have Qwest DSL and also have a landline due to their packaging requirements to get a good deal. We recently had a squirrel chew through the fiber optic cable that supplies our landline voice to our island. It left us with very poor "duct-taped quality" landline service for nearly a week, but our DSL was still working great. Since I use Google Voice as a front end, I just set things up to forward our GV number to my ooma. No one knew the difference.

Then a week or so later, our power went out due a tree falling in high winds. Happens quite often in the Northwest. This time, we had phone service but the DSL was dead. They don't back up the DSL cabinets with batteries so if the power goes out, no DSL. If we didn't have a landline, a cheap cell phone would have been a real blessing. Even if you hate cell phones, I suggest getting one for safety's sake. I use a cell service that uses ATT and costs me $5.50 a month for 150 minutes. Just a nice way to feel a little safer.
#41675 by joeed2
Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:10 pm
I bought a fairly large UPS (1200va). But even with that, brand new and fully charged, it only powered my modem/router/ooma hub/cordless handset for about 50 minutes before it died. Plus as time goes on, the battery life is shorter and shorter, and eventually the batteries have to be replaced. After a few test runs, I returned it.

So, UPS is not really an option for long term outages. It is more for lightning strikes and short outages.

Let's face it, landlines will eventually go the route of the dinasaur. So it's time to start looking at cellphones. I'll bet 25% of all calls that go to a 911 center already come in from cellphones.
#41679 by caseybea
Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:35 pm
I don't think anyone said a UPS is a good solution for a "long term" backup to a power loss. 50 minutes is actually quite good, considering you probably had several devices plugged in (ooma, cable or dsl modem, router, ....). A UPS is indeed really good for "most" power outages, which can last anywhere from seconds to several minutes. It keeps your equipment running, and keeps it protected. And in my mind, the time during a power outage is one of the times you may REALLY need phone service...

I agree, a cell phone is good too, but cell companies have their issues as well. Service can go out, cell trunks can get 'full' with to many callers, etc. Nothing's perfect. I guess the more ways I can potentially call 911 in an emergency, the better.

And yeah, UPS batteries don't last forever, they do have to be replaced. Same for people who use battery backup-up systems for sump pumps in their basement. The battery-replacement cost is just a part of doing business to keep things running and keep the basement from getting flooded. And replacing THOSE batteries is quite costly. (Unless, like me, you have a WATER-POWERED backup sump pump, but that's a different story..) :D

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