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#27503 by RealDave
Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:07 am
I wanted my ooma behind my router so I can monitor all of my traffic and use my own QoS settings. Here is the easiest way to do it.

1) Connect a wire from the ooma's "To Internet" plug to the router.
2) Check to see what IP address your router assigned to the ooma.
3) Type that IP address into your DMZ setting.
4) Set your QoS for the ooma.
5) Optional but recommended. Make the ooma IP address static.

That's it. You will not be able to browse into the ooma's built-in web server (unless you connect a computer to the ooma's other ethernet port), but "who cares?" You really shouldn't need to anyway.
#27504 by ggilman
Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:20 am
RealDave wrote:5) Optional but recommended. Make the ooma IP address static.

Best option is to use a DHCP reservation in the router. Static IP is 2nd best choice. If you don't do one of these though, eventually you'll find that your device grabbed a different address and your QoS is no longer working.

RealDave wrote:You will not be able to browse into the ooma's built-in web server (unless you connect a computer to the ooma's other ethernet port), but "who cares?" You really shouldn't need to anyway.

If you do want access, you can set up the DMZ in the ooma to 172.27.35.1. You will then have to use the IP address of the ooma device (the one you chose via DHCP assignment or static addressing), rather than setup.ooma.com, but you can get access to the web server. Only do this if you are behind a router though, definitely NOT safe if it is before your router.
#27506 by gregg098
Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:27 am
You do not need to use DMZ option on your router at all. I have both a Hub and a Telo behind my router and they both worked fine with no additional configuration necessary. I did, however, set a static IP and set QoS rules through my router.

And correct me if Im wrong, but Im pretty sure that if you put a device in the DMZ that QoS settings have no bearing on that device.
#27520 by ggilman
Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:15 am
gregg098 wrote:You do not need to use DMZ option on your router at all. I have both a Hub and a Telo behind my router and they both worked fine with no additional configuration necessary. I did, however, set a static IP and set QoS rules through my router.

And correct me if Im wrong, but Im pretty sure that if you put a device in the DMZ that QoS settings have no bearing on that device.

I'm assuming you are referencing my post. Mine referenced opening the DMZ on the ooma device, NOT the router. This is to provide access to the ooma setup and shouldn't affect much else. There shouldn't be any need to open ports up on your router for your ooma device to work properly.

If you did open a DMZ though, I don't see why opening the DMZ would negate QoS settings.
#27521 by RealDave
Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:16 am
ggilman wrote:Best option is to use a DHCP reservation in the router. Static IP is 2nd best choice.


Reserve the IP address/make the DHCP address static is six of one/half dozen of the other. Actually, the very best way is to build the QoS rules with the MAC address and don't even screw with IP address and there will never be a problem but I wanted to keep the rules as simple as possible.
#27525 by RealDave
Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:21 am
gregg098 wrote:You do not need to use DMZ option on your router at all. I have both a Hub and a Telo behind my router and they both worked fine with no additional configuration necessary. I did, however, set a static IP and set QoS rules through my router.

And correct me if Im wrong, but Im pretty sure that if you put a device in the DMZ that QoS settings have no bearing on that device.


You don't need to use the DMZ option, but it makes things much easier since one doesn't need to specify all the ports with rules. I could be wrong, but from searching I saw that the ooma uses about a half dozen specific ports and the range of 10k-20k. By putting the ooma on the DMZ, all of that is immediately and easily taken care off.

Even in the DMZ, someone would still want to set the QoS settings to ensure the best quality. I haven't seen anything about being on the DMZ negates QoS settings.
#27530 by gregg098
Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:29 am
ggilman wrote:I'm assuming you are referencing my post. Mine referenced opening the DMZ on the ooma device, NOT the router. This is to provide access to the ooma setup and shouldn't affect much else. There shouldn't be any need to open ports up on your router for your ooma device to work properly.

If you did open a DMZ though, I don't see why opening the DMZ would negate QoS settings.


I should have quoted before, but no, I was referring to the OP. You're right though on the DMZ option on the ooma device. This has worked well for me with the hub and Telo behind the router.


RealDave wrote:You don't need to use the DMZ option, but it makes things much easier since one doesn't need to specify all the ports with rules. I could be wrong, but from searching I saw that the ooma uses about a half dozen specific ports and the range of 10k-20k. By putting the ooma on the DMZ, all of that is immediately and easily taken care off.

Even in the DMZ, someone would still want to set the QoS settings to ensure the best quality. I haven't seen anything about being on the DMZ negates QoS settings.


You dont have to specify ANY ports with rules. You can simply plug the hub or Telo into the router and it works..period. As far as QoS, use the mac address as a previous poster said. This will encompass ALL ports being used by the device. The next best option is to use a static lease on the hub/Telo and specify the IP address for the QoS rule.
#27594 by ggilman
Mon Oct 19, 2009 1:59 pm
RealDave wrote:Reserve the IP address/make the DHCP address static is six of one/half dozen of the other.

Not really quite equal. If anything changes in your setup, (DNS Server for example), DHCP reservation will automatically propagate changes after some time. If you statically set everything, you'll have to go to each device that has static settings and make changes, rather than just at the router. Likewise, for the most part, on the clients you just turn DHCP on and you're done, no extra settings to set in the first place whereas if you set stuff statically, you'll have to set several numbers rather than just a check-box. That part isn't much more difficult than creating a reservation though.

Not really a big deal on the average small home network but if you get more than a couple of devices on the network, it's much easier just to set up client reservations for those that require it.

RealDave wrote:Actually, the very best way is to build the QoS rules with the MAC address and don't even screw with IP address and there will never be a problem but I wanted to keep the rules as simple as possible.

True, if you have a router that supports QoS via MAC. Personally, mine doesn't. Assignable via IP only. Not sure if more have this assignable via MAC or IP.
#27595 by ggilman
Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:07 pm
gregg098 wrote:You dont have to specify ANY ports with rules. You can simply plug the hub or Telo into the router and it works..period. As far as QoS, use the mac address as a previous poster said. This will encompass ALL ports being used by the device. The next best option is to use a static lease on the hub/Telo and specify the IP address for the QoS rule.

I agree with gregg on this. I have had both the Telo and original ooma hub behind my router at the same time without any port forwarding rules at all set up and it works fine. With both back there, what would I even forward? I assume they use the same ports so I'd be in trouble since I wouldn't be able to choose which one to forward any given port to.

I do have DMZ set up on the ooma devices, for referencing the web page setups, but NOT any port forwarding/DMZ on the router. I'd specifically suggest against this as it adds network vulnerabilities to your system that are unwarranted.
#27645 by daet
Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:21 pm
ggilman wrote:
RealDave wrote:Reserve the IP address/make the DHCP address static is six of one/half dozen of the other.

Not really quite equal. If anything changes in your setup, (DNS Server for example), DHCP reservation will automatically propagate changes after some time.

I agree with you - using a static IP address isn't the same as using DHCP reservation. However most routers will permit you to specify a range of IP addresses to be assigned via DHCP. Anything outside of that range can be assigned statically. If it is a small controlled network, as most home networks are, the odds of conflicting IP addresses are minimal.

DG

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