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#13476 by Aveamantium
Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:55 pm
but2002 wrote:My download speed is 6016 kbps
My Upload speed is 768 kbps

What do you recommend that I put in my QOS to keep my calls clear without killing my bandwidth?


In the upload bandwidth field you actually want to enter what the speed test shows (or maybe a little less in case it changes a little). So in your case you want to put in 760 kbps. You can also populate the download bandwidth fields with 6000 kbps if you would like, but like Wayne said since your download is large enough you can probably be ok with entering 0 (which disables Qos in that particular direction).

Basically, you want to tell the ooma hub what your actual upstream (and downstream, if necessary) speeds are so it can still give you a quality call and give you the remaining bandwidth for your LAN. Let's say you have 1000kbps upload and you tell ooma that you have only 300 kbps in the upload, it will say ok I'm going to give 130 kbps (default reserved bandwidth, which you can change now) and give the remaining 170 kbps to the LAN and cap all out going bandwidth at this point to ensure the bandwidth is available for the call. However by doing this you're basically giving up about 700 kbps of upload during a call. So for this example you'd want to tell ooma (in the upload bandwidth field) that you actually have 1000kbps and then when a call is initiated it will reserve 130kbps (again the default) for the outbound voice and give the remaining 870 kbps to the LAN.

Now the opposite is true as well... Let's stick with the 1000 kbps number is the actual upload bandwidth. For some reason you enter 1500 kbps in the ooma' upload bandwidth field. Once a call is initiated it will again try to allocate 130 kbps to the call leaving 1370 for the LAN. Unfortunately, your connection can't actually support up to 1500 kbps so if you were doing heavy uploads you would saturate your call and "break" the Qos causing the call to break up.

Again, you want to enter the actual speeds in the upload (and download, if necessary) bandwidth fields. I still prefer to have the ooma between the modem and the router because this traffic shaping only occurs when a call is taking place. So if a call is not taking place you get the full 1000kbps upload (again using this as the actual upload speed) and when a call is taking place you should only be reduced to the 870 kbps.
#13479 by atici
Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:59 pm
RRA wrote:can you please tell me which ip (192.168.0.1 is my router ip) to put in DMZ?

You need: modem -> router -> ooma

Also you need to configure your router settings for DMZ as well as giving ooma packets higher priority. ooma device will be demilitarized (so that it can receive send everything without router blocking it).
#13487 by RRA
Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:18 pm
Atici and Wayne, I made the changes as per your suggestion (Modem ->router ->ooma). I reverted back ooma settings for (upload and download stream) to default (384,0), but I did not make any change in DMZ or Mac priority yet (to be honest I am not sure, if my router support it)

I tried one call and browsing at the same time,it went well, I will try tomorrow also and post my update.

Thanks
#13509 by Aveamantium
Mon Jul 20, 2009 5:44 am
RRA wrote:Atici and Wayne, I made the changes as per your suggestion (Modem ->router ->ooma). I reverted back ooma settings for (upload and download stream) to default (384,0), but I did not make any change in DMZ or Mac priority yet (to be honest I am not sure, if my router support it)

I tried one call and browsing at the same time,it went well, I will try tomorrow also and post my update.

Thanks

Like Wayne was saying, if you have the ooma behind your router there is no reason to even mess with Qos as it won't do anything. This is only for when your ooma is ahead of your router and is "seeing" LAN traffic.

As for DMZ, you may not need it. If you start to experience one way audio then you'll have to look into this as your firewall in the router may be blocking some voice traffic.
#13563 by but2002
Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:33 pm
Aveamantium wrote:
but2002 wrote:My download speed is 6016 kbps
My Upload speed is 768 kbps

What do you recommend that I put in my QOS to keep my calls clear without killing my bandwidth?


In the upload bandwidth field you actually want to enter what the speed test shows (or maybe a little less in case it changes a little). So in your case you want to put in 760 kbps. You can also populate the download bandwidth fields with 6000 kbps if you would like, but like Wayne said since your download is large enough you can probably be ok with entering 0 (which disables Qos in that particular direction).

Basically, you want to tell the ooma hub what your actual upstream (and downstream, if necessary) speeds are so it can still give you a quality call and give you the remaining bandwidth for your LAN. Let's say you have 1000kbps upload and you tell ooma that you have only 300 kbps in the upload, it will say ok I'm going to give 130 kbps (default reserved bandwidth, which you can change now) and give the remaining 170 kbps to the LAN and cap all out going bandwidth at this point to ensure the bandwidth is available for the call. However by doing this you're basically giving up about 700 kbps of upload during a call. So for this example you'd want to tell ooma (in the upload bandwidth field) that you actually have 1000kbps and then when a call is initiated it will reserve 130kbps (again the default) for the outbound voice and give the remaining 870 kbps to the LAN.

Now the opposite is true as well... Let's stick with the 1000 kbps number is the actual upload bandwidth. For some reason you enter 1500 kbps in the ooma' upload bandwidth field. Once a call is initiated it will again try to allocate 130 kbps to the call leaving 1370 for the LAN. Unfortunately, your connection can't actually support up to 1500 kbps so if you were doing heavy uploads you would saturate your call and "break" the Qos causing the call to break up.

Again, you want to enter the actual speeds in the upload (and download, if necessary) bandwidth fields. I still prefer to have the ooma between the modem and the router because this traffic shaping only occurs when a call is taking place. So if a call is not taking place you get the full 1000kbps upload (again using this as the actual upload speed) and when a call is taking place you should only be reduced to the 870 kbps.


Thank you for this post, this is exactly what I was needing :P
#15258 by RRA
Sat Aug 08, 2009 5:03 pm
Hi Guys,

I am posting my question after 2-3 weeks of ooma testing. My configuration is (modem-->router-->ooma ), as suggested by Wayne and it was working great so far. My number recently got ported to ooma, and since the number is ported, I am experiencing voice quality and browsing issue again (not sure porting has anything to do with it).

Voice quality - sometimes I hear echo on outgoing calls and its me only not the other party. Voice breaks a lot of time. Qos test on whichvoip.com can vary 50% to 80% within an hour, jitter is between 1.3 and 1.9, it used to be 0.0 before porting.

browsing quality - test on speedtest.net shows download speed between 5-6 Mbps, which used to be 10-11 Mbps before porting.

I am more concerned about voice quality than browsing, as I am not sure browsing issue is caused by ooma or my antivirus Kaspersky. One more thing which I noticed about speedtest.net test is, if I shutdown my AV, speed bumps back to 10-11 Mbps.

Please suggest.
Thanks
#15297 by UnknownCaller
Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:22 am
This is one of the first things that I played with after getting it setup. The problem is for some reason the Oopaloompa's used KBps for the QoS calculations - instead of layman kbps which can more easily be converted in the head to common MBps or Kbps terms of which ISP's and most speedtest sites designate and market thier speeds. From your settings page displayed you are actually choking yourself DOWN to a 384K/384K line ie: 56K modem x 6.5, I have 18M/4M cable and after doing exactly what you did I realized I was dealing with KBps and changed those settings to 4096/18432 and viola make a phone call and run a speedtest and you get your bandwish back.

After even more tooling I found it better to put the ooma as suggested by other contributers MODEM>ROUTER>SWITCH>OOMA - with setting static IP info into the oooma prior to the move and then setting the ooma static IP as DMZ in the router. This ofcourse prevents you from accessing the web interface on the oooma, but once configured it has been set and forget.

Seting the ooma DMZ has no effect on incoming security access either as the web interface is not accessible from the WAN side of the ooma. And if you do need to access the ooma again, it's done by simply changing over one cable from the other router/sitch to the home side of the ooma and if your PC is configured for DHCP it will then grab an ooma generated IP from the home router side of the ooma box and viola easy access again to the web interface.

I actually ended up putting my wirelessAP on the ooma network side as the kids in the house are the big bandwith p2p and streaming hogs and thier all on wireless :) so their traffic is actually QoS'ed and limited by the ooma - beware of evil tech dads :)

ciao
#15339 by RRA
Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Hi unknowcaller,

I am not sure if I understood your answer, but here are screenshot for ooma and my dlink settings, please explain what I should change? what exactly is the switch in your settings?

One more thing is that my ooma never got an ip from router, not sure why, when I activated my ooma that time I chose that my ooma is after modem, could that be the reason?

dlink.JPG
dlink.JPG (50.01 KiB) Viewed 3146 times

ooma.JPG
ooma.JPG (29.03 KiB) Viewed 3146 times

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