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#94213 by kturcotte
Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:18 pm
Like to see Ooma come out with a with a replacement for the Ooma Telo. LOVE to see them release a cable modem with IPv6, Gb Ethernnet port, and DOCSIS 3.0 support that has an Ooma Telo built in! I would think the call quality would be better, since the device wouldn't be behind anything? When we had Time Warner's digital phone, the call quality was a little better.
#94215 by lbmofo
Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:43 pm
kturcotte wrote:When we had Time Warner's digital phone, the call quality was a little better.

VoIP quality depends on the quality of your internet. Sometimes, even when your internet is crappy, if you subscribe to the cable company's digital voice also, the phone service maybe good (despite the bad quality internet). This is because cable companies give data packets associated with their phone service the highest priority on their line. This ability to assign higher priority to data packets associated with thier phone service gives the false impression that their phone service is better when in fact other VoIP would be just as good if internet quality is good.

Ooma's low bandwidth codec plus adaptive redundancy (packet loss is the enemy of VoIP – it can cause voice to sound stuttered or garbled. Ooma can detect packet loss on your Internet connection before you even hear it and automatically deploy redundant packets to boost the clarity of your phone call) helps it have the best "regular" VoIP over the internet. I suspect if you have other VoIP service, your quality would drop off even more.
#94217 by kturcotte
Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:53 pm
I've got the Ooma Device in between the modem and the router. Anything I can do to improve voice quality?
#94219 by EX Bell
Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:07 pm
lbmofo wrote:
kturcotte wrote:When we had Time Warner's digital phone, the call quality was a little better.

VoIP quality depends on the quality of your internet. Sometimes, even when your internet is crappy, if you subscribe to the cable company's digital voice also, the phone service maybe good (despite the bad quality internet). This is because cable companies give data packets associated with their phone service the highest priority on their line. This ability to assign higher priority to data packets associated with thier phone service gives the false impression that their phone service is better when in fact other VoIP would be just as good if internet quality is good.

Ooma's low bandwidth codec plus adaptive redundancy (packet loss is the enemy of VoIP – it can cause voice to sound stuttered or garbled. Ooma can detect packet loss on your Internet connection before you even hear it and automatically deploy redundant packets to boost the clarity of your phone call) helps it have the best "regular" VoIP over the internet. I suspect if you have other VoIP service, your quality would drop off even more.


+1 My internet isn't cheap for the speed I get, but it is stable and the quality is good, with very few hops from server to server. My biggest challenge and mistake in the beginning was that I was not managing my internal network's quality of service. Once I added a Cisco Linksys router as my gateway and utilized its QoS feature, my phone service with Ooma has been very solid, with consistent high quality voice. This has been a great experience so far. I have been able to install the Telo after the router as I wanted, in the location that I wanted. I'm on the path to saving a lots versus my former POTS line provider and I'm enjoying the premium service and features of Ooma on a shoestring budget.
Last edited by EX Bell on Wed Mar 21, 2012 11:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
#94220 by kturcotte
Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:21 pm
I'd like to install the Ooma Device behind my router as well, but not sure of the best way to do it (Configure my router and such).
#94244 by EX Bell
Wed Mar 21, 2012 11:26 am
As ibmofo said, High priority by MAC Address is the best way to do it. I'm also a proponent of DHCP address reservation by MAC address. Many consumer routers function best when they're allowed to distribute a range of IP addresses to devices on the network. The developers expect the average person to not know anything about manually configuring or routing IP addresses and so they optimize the software to favor DHCP. The pages preceding the QoS section for your router manual explain how to reserve a specific IP address by MAC address of the device.

The firmware of Netgear routers has changed a lot since I last looked at it last and it is much more capable than my retired Netgear router that didn't support QoS. I don't have a guide for your router, but the capabilities are similar and therefor the setup should be similar to my Cisco Linksys router. Have a look at my Cisco Linksys setup for Ooma guide and refer to your Netgear manual. Between the two, should be able to setup your Ooma Telo after your Netgear router without any trouble.

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