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#74462 by nn5i
Sat Feb 05, 2011 6:15 am
leob wrote:Who cares? I've asked a very simple question, why is it so hard for everyone so far to answer it directly?


It's because they don't know. There are many here, as on most fora, who blithely answer questions when they actually haven't a clue. Many of them don't realize they don't know, and think they offer useful replies.

..The responses these have sent
..Unwittingly represent
..A source of innocent merriment,
..Of innocent merriment.

My apologies to W. S. Gilbert for changing his words slightly.
.
#74470 by murphy
Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:54 am
leob wrote:In light of recent events (IANA IPv4 address pool exhaustion) I think that it is not too early to ask whether Ooma devices are IPv6 ready (or software upgradeable to IPv6). Are they?

Okay I'll answer itr directly.
No they are not IPv6 ready.
Can they be made IPv6 ready?, only the Ooma designer(s) can answer that question.

I've been running IPv6 for over 6 months.
I have found less than a dozen web sites that support IPv6 (not counting all of the test sites).
The only major one is Google and you have to use a special URL to get to it.
#74532 by nn5i
Sat Feb 05, 2011 8:52 pm
Murphy, you seem knowledgeable in this area. Am I correct to think that the hardware layer is unchanged between IPv4 and IPv6? If that's right, am I likely correct in thinking that, therefore, only a firmware change would be required?

If all of that is true, then the only real impediment might be the firmware memory size in the Ooma devices. One of these days maybe I'll open mine up (it opens up very nicely if you drop it on the floor), and see what flash chips it uses.
#74533 by harry12
Sat Feb 05, 2011 9:08 pm
.
Check your readiness for ipv6 ( if you REALLY care ). Look at: http://www.ipv6-test.com/.

Personally, I'm not going to load the ipv6 protocol ( Xp diehard here ).
Methinks I've got enough junk running in the background.
#74543 by murphy
Sun Feb 06, 2011 4:27 am
nn5i wrote:Murphy, you seem knowledgeable in this area. Am I correct to think that the hardware layer is unchanged between IPv4 and IPv6? If that's right, am I likely correct in thinking that, therefore, only a firmware change would be required?

If all of that is true, then the only real impediment might be the firmware memory size in the Ooma devices. One of these days maybe I'll open mine up (it opens up very nicely if you drop it on the floor), and see what flash chips it uses.

That is correct. I am running a mode called 6RD with Comcast. It creates a tunnel to a server that provides the IPv6 connectivity to the internet. The modem is still in IPv4 mode. The router has to support IPv6 for it to work. The Apple routers are the only ones that do it out of the box to my knowledge. I am using a Linksys WRT320N. The stock firmware did not support IPv6. I loaded the recommended version of DD-WRT firmware into it to get it to work on IPv6. All Windows operating systems from XP forward support IPv6. It has to be turned on in XP. It's on by default in Vista and 7. OS/X also supports IPv6.

So yes if the hardware has enough flash and RAM to support the added code it is possible.
At this point only the people who can't get an IPv4 IP address issued to them have to worry seriously about IPv6. I am not aware of anywhere in the USA where you can't get an IPv4 IP address from your ISP.

Go here

http://www.comcast6.net/

to learn enough about IPv6 implementation to make your head hurt.
#74549 by highq
Sun Feb 06, 2011 10:33 am
murphy wrote:
nn5i wrote:At this point only the people who can't get an IPv4 IP address issued to them have to worry seriously about IPv6. I am not aware of anywhere in the USA where you can't get an IPv4 IP address from your ISP.

It somehow seems like long ago in a far-away galaxy, but it was only in November 2009 that I was assigned a Class C network. I had an ISP, personal friends, that kept routing my address block even after CIDR-routing started to prevail. That ISP got absorbed into some larger conglomerate.

I doubt I could find an ISP to route my Class C today; I use it internally, and I have not seen any sign that the 'net authorities would try to reclaim it. Surely I'm not the only party in similar circumstances: I'm implying that a slew of IPv4 addresses have been assigned but are really not in use at all.

And it was in 1990 that I registered my domain name: just imagine, I own one of the 15,625 possible three-letter domain names.
#74579 by nn5i
Mon Feb 07, 2011 7:40 am
Thank you, Murphy. That was clear, and helpful.
#74599 by leob
Mon Feb 07, 2011 1:37 pm
highq wrote:I doubt I could find an ISP to route my Class C today; I use it internally, and I have not seen any sign that the 'net authorities would try to reclaim it.

Why should they bother? It will not help anyone.
And it was in 1990 that I registered my domain name: just imagine, I own one of the 15,625 possible three-letter domain names.

Which letter out of the 26 don't you like? Which TLD (out of how many?) do you mean? Also 3-character domain names of the form X-X are possible.
#74604 by highq
Mon Feb 07, 2011 2:02 pm
oops! my gray matter is fading, eh, if I can't discern the difference between the cube of 26 and the cube of 25.

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