Having trouble placing or receiving calls or using your voicemail system on Ooma Telo VoIP Phones? Post your questions here.
#45827 by amoney
Sun Feb 07, 2010 1:34 pm
franklfr wrote:I was told that if I hear the Ooma dialtone it's routing calls over Ooma VOIP and not the POTS landline. Is that wrong?

If that's the case and I have a landline plugged in and always hear the Ooma dialtone, I'm assuming it's not using the POTS line (unless a failover case is needed).

I really wish there was concrete documentation or info somewhere for the Telo that would clear this up.


People have indicated that inorder to receive caller ID with landline integration, that one needs to subscribe to the service on the landline, this would indicate that incoming calls route through the landline.
#45984 by franklfr
Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:29 pm
southsound wrote:You keep asking it in different ways - possibly until you get the answer you like - even if it is wrong?


I appreciate your answers, however - I get a different answer when I call Ooma. I called again today and a different technical support person again, said the same thing. If you hear the Ooma dialtone on the Telo, then ALL calls are routed via Ooma VOIP. She double checked this with another person as well since I asked her to verify. That's why it's frustrating it's not simply written down anywhere. For example, you would think that if they route local calls via the landline, if integrated, they would note that somewhere prominently (as you did) since you'll be charged for those call is using metered service. Seems like a pretty important point.

I also tested it myself and local calls don't go through the landline (even though there's no connection tone). Again, wish it was written down somewhere exactly what's going on.
Last edited by franklfr on Mon Feb 08, 2010 3:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
#45991 by southsound
Mon Feb 08, 2010 3:16 pm
franklfr wrote:
southsound wrote:You keep asking it in different ways - possibly until you get the answer you like - even if it is wrong?


No, I appreciate your answers, however - I get a different answer when I call Ooma. That's why it's frustrating it's not simply written down anywhere. For example, you would think that if they route local calls via the landline, if integrated, they would note that somewhere prominently (as you did) since you'll be charged for those call is using metered service. Seems like a pretty important point.

Also, here's the current situation, which I think would be fairly common. Until my number is ported (3-4 weeks), I can't unplug my landline since I need the incoming calls. Frankly, I'm just surprised that people wanting to keep an integrated backup landline isn't a more common use-case. I've setup simple VOIP systems in the past and haven't had this much of an issue.

Frank, your comment about the lack of documentation is right on! Many of us first came to the forum because we didn't know where else to turn. When I first bought my hub/scout, support was in the US - but it took 30 minutes plus to get through. As they grew they added the support center in Manila as a front line support group. Most of the people really try to give the right answer, but since many are not technically proficient, I think they are frustrated by the lack of documentation as well. If they had better training, a more complete problem-driven knowledgebase, and a way to live escalate to a higher level support group if they didn't know the answer or could not fix the problem, there would be a lot fewer problems. In my case, I found that if I read most of the posts as time allows, I gain a lot more understanding than I ever thought possible. My background includes working for ATT, Pacific Telesis, Apple, NeXT, and Microsoft - all before VOIP was even available to most. This forum has been a great learning tool for me. Please don't let my previous terse responses discourage you from the product or from visiting the board. In the future, you will be able to help other people with similar questions. And I think I also missed saying, "Welcome to ooma! You're going to like it here!" :cool:
#45995 by highq
Mon Feb 08, 2010 3:35 pm
southsound wrote:Simple routing if you have a landline integrated: All outgoing local calls plus 911 goes through the landline. Long distance goes through ooma. All incoming calls go through landline.

I've had my Yelo with an integrated landline since mid-December.

Three things lead me to disagree that local calls route through the landline.

First, my current Verizon bill for that landline here in 212-land shows nothing, zip, nada for Local Usage Charges.

Second, I just yanked the RJ-11 plug out of the Telo's Wall port and called my wife's 212 number, and I certainly heard it ring in the next room.

Third, I've set the Telo for 10-digit dialing, and I don't see how a 10-digit number would be handled by Verizon at all.

This is just more grist for the mill that was grinding along here in serval threads suggesting that a detailed User Guide and Techincal manual is sorely needed. Who know, maybe the CS reps might find it as instructive as the users. ;)
#45996 by southsound
Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:06 pm
Here is a quote from Mojo, an ooma moderator back in March, 2009:

Mojo wrote:
darlinsk wrote:He said that ALL outgoing calls, local and long distance, are handled by Ooma when it is integrated with a landline. Is this true?


This is false - if your using ooma with a landline, only your local calls will go out through your landline. Only long-distance calls will go out the ooma network.

Also, the main benefit of using a landline is you get the reliability of being able to make calls (including 911) even during an Internet or power outage (with a corded or battery-backed-up cordless phone) [This is not true of the Telo. They eliminated the relay that gave power failure transfer] . You'll also be able to keep your existing number without porting your number.

The downside of keeping a landline is obviously the cost of CFB if you want to use the Instant Second Line on that number and caller-ID if you want to see the name and the number on your landline.

You may opt to get the best of both worlds (landline reliability + cost savings) by integrating ooma with a very basic landline (even with metered service) and by choosing a new ooma phone number. This way you can use your new ooma phone number for all your outgoing calls and make use of the ISL and caller-ID but still get the added reliability of being able to make calls using your ooma system when there's a power outage.


viewtopic.php?f=5&t=947&start=0&#p4541

If things have changed, I have not seen anything from ooma that would indicate a new routing plan. Comment above in [ ] is mine.
#46006 by amoney
Mon Feb 08, 2010 5:22 pm
Great info South...

I think there is added confusion between "local" use, as there have been descrepencies in wording or rather generalizations regarding incoming and outgoing local calls. I am even confused, from what I have read and use of logic, incoming certainly seems as though it is routing over the landline awhile back.

Added to the confusion, correct me if I am wrong here, I believe I read Ooma changed how the routing of calls were handled with landline integration.

A Ooma mod should hopefully be able to clarify.
#46013 by murphy
Mon Feb 08, 2010 5:37 pm
highq wrote:Third, I've set the Telo for 10-digit dialing, and I don't see how a 10-digit number would be handled by Verizon at all.

I live in Verizon territory, Philadelphia, PA. For the last decade the only way to dial a local call has been by 10 digit dialing. This is a result of area code overlays. My house is in 3 different area codes. On the Verizon system 7 digit dialing doesn't work. If you start with a 1 you are connected to your long distance company and they don't do local calling.
#46101 by highq
Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:05 am
murphy wrote:
highq wrote:Third, I've set the Telo for 10-digit dialing, and I don't see how a 10-digit number would be handled by Verizon at all.

I live in Verizon territory, Philadelphia, PA. For the last decade the only way to dial a local call has been by 10 digit dialing. This is a result of area code overlays. My house is in 3 different area codes. On the Verizon system 7 digit dialing doesn't work. If you start with a 1 you are connected to your long distance company and they don't do local calling.


Well I'm in New York City where EVERY call, whether to the 212|347|646|718|917 codes which are local calls, or to anywhere else where the North American area codes are in effect, MUST start with a '1'. The only times one does not start off with a '1' is when dialing 411, 911, 311, 958, and other such service tags.

http://www.vzmultimedia.com/customersup ... ork_2.html
#46103 by amoney
Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:15 am
highq wrote:
murphy wrote:
highq wrote:Third, I've set the Telo for 10-digit dialing, and I don't see how a 10-digit number would be handled by Verizon at all.

I live in Verizon territory, Philadelphia, PA. For the last decade the only way to dial a local call has been by 10 digit dialing. This is a result of area code overlays. My house is in 3 different area codes. On the Verizon system 7 digit dialing doesn't work. If you start with a 1 you are connected to your long distance company and they don't do local calling.


Well I'm in New York City where EVERY call, whether to the 212|347|646|718|917 codes which are local calls, or to anywhere else where the North American area codes are in effect, MUST start with a '1'. The only times one does not start off with a '1' is when dialing 411, 911, 311, 958, and other such service tags.

http://www.vzmultimedia.com/customersup ... ork_2.html


And I thought 10 digit dialing was rediculous. Ah the good old days of 7 digit dialing.

And I still have the tendency of dialing 1+ when calling long distance. Its a comfort thing I guess. Ha!

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