Having trouble placing or receiving calls or using your voicemail system on Ooma Telo VoIP Phones? Post your questions here.
#16648 by wjcarpenter
Thu Aug 20, 2009 5:18 pm
My ooma is integrated with my landline, so it uses my landline to make local calls. How does ooma know what is a local call and what is long distance? I live in one of the many areas where there are some numbers in my area code that are toll calls. Does ooma know about this or does it use some other technique to figure out what calls are LD?

(I asked support, but all I could get was repeated assertions that "Yes, it knows".)
#16656 by wjcarpenter
Thu Aug 20, 2009 5:37 pm
bw1 wrote:Yes, it knows.

:-)
I assume that Ooma has that information in routing databases that the hub checks when you make a call.

Yeah, I know what's local and what's not, but I'm not assuming ooma knows.
#16658 by bw1
Thu Aug 20, 2009 5:46 pm
Ok, based on what I've read, I know that the Ooma hub communicates to Ooma servers to determine routing information and since it then uses the landline for local calls, it must "know" what is local and what is not.

Seems like that information should be available to them since it's available to us. But, I have no inside knowledge. :)
#16659 by bw1
Thu Aug 20, 2009 5:48 pm
By the way, how do you like using Ooma integrated with your landline?

What advantages/disadvantages do you observe with it setup that way?
#16670 by wjcarpenter
Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:07 pm
bw1 wrote:By the way, how do you like using Ooma integrated with your landline? What advantages/disadvantages do you observe with it setup that way?


The main advantage is that the ooma-attached handsets ring when my landline rings. With completely separate lines, that was not so. (That seems ridiculous to me, but it looks like that was the design.) I also like the fact that my 911 and local calls go out over the landline (because, let's get serious here, landline quality is seldom worse than VOIP and often better).

OTOH, the disadvantage is that it seems like you have to trick someone into telling you the secret number assigned to the ooma. So, if you want to do CFB and get all the ooma benefits, well, you're stuck.
#16777 by niknak
Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:40 pm
... how does ooma know what is a local call and what is long distance? I live in one of the many areas where there are some numbers in my area code that are toll calls. Does ooma know about this or does it use some other technique to figure out what calls are LD?...


The way it works is through ratecenters...these are geographical areas throughout the country (roughly equivalent to the locations of your local telephone office) where a phone company's switching equipment is located. Each rate center has a number of local exchanges programmed into the switch which are true local calls - basically the call is connected through the local switch without going through any other switch or to another ratecenter

for all other calls - local toll calls, long distance calls - the call is routed to the appropriate ratecenter and switched to the subscriber, incurring a fee.

ooma uses CLECS in various rate centers to complete subscriber's calls.

This is also the explaination of why ooma does not have local numbers available in certain areas - the CLEC ooma uses does not have a switch in that particular ratecenter, and ooma cannot offer numbers there.

Of course number become available from time to time, so it is possible that ooma may get a precsence in a particular ratecenter in the future
#16779 by wjcarpenter
Fri Aug 21, 2009 5:00 pm
niknak wrote:The way it works is through ratecenters...

It's not clear to me if you're just describing the general way that CLECs and ILECs work, or if you mean you know that ooma uses that info to distinguish free local calls from pay-per-minute local calls. I sorta, kinda maybe know a little bit about telco settlements and stuff, but there is not much info on ooma.com or available from the average ooma CS person about this.

You'd think it would be easy, but I spent a good chunk of time today prowling around Verizon's web site trying to find local calling information for my home phone. (Yeah, I know I said earlier that I already know my local calling area, but that was poetic license. :-)) I came up dry, so I called Verizon, and after about 10 minutes on hold, the guy came back with a not very confident sounding answer for the specific nearby exchange that I asked about.
#16780 by niknak
Fri Aug 21, 2009 5:04 pm
there are websites on line to identify ratecenters
also verizons pages on line will tell you what exchanges are considered local to youm but I saw it a while ago and don't remember where on their site it is.

Ooma is not a telephone company they are a telephone service provider who use VOIP to connect calls.
The ILECs. RBOCs, CLECs own the buildings and the switches - ooma contracts with CLECs to provide coverage

Edit here is a link for verizon local call finder

http://www22.verizon.com/ResidentialHelp/Phone/Billing/Local+and+Regional+Toll+Calling+Areas/Local+and+Regional+Toll+Call+Definitions/96087.htm

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