This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#56082 by worldtraveler
Wed May 19, 2010 5:37 pm
I've only had my TELO for a week now, and so far I am basically pleased with it. I have Qwest DSL and have an integrated Actiontec modem/router. The modem/router has one ethernet connection and one USB connection. If I connect the TELO with the ethernet cable to the modem then the Telo HOME NETWORK plug to my PC the quality goes way down versus connecting the TELO to the modem then the modem USB directly to my PC and not going through the Telo. My concern is if I do not use the Telo Home Network connection to my PC am I getting worse quality on my phone connection? Below are my numbers from VOIP speed test. Do anyone have a recommendation how I should actually hook this up for the best call clarity?


With USB from Modem to PC:
VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 2.1 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 3.6 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.0 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.0

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 1283336 bps
Upload speed: 806504 bps
Download quality of service: 99 %
Upload quality of service: 100 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 141 ms
Average download pause: 20 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 80 ms
Average round trip time to server: 88 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 3280000bps
Route concurrency: 2.5558388
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 6553496bps


With TELO Home Network connected to PC:
VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 2.6 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 3.6 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.0 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.0

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 1123872 bps
Upload speed: 806432 bps
Download quality of service: 38 %
Upload quality of service: 99 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 619 ms
Average download pause: 32 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 73 ms
Average round trip time to server: 75 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 1360000bps
Route concurrency: 1.2101022
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 7181912bps
#56184 by Soundjudgment
Thu May 20, 2010 2:44 pm
Hmmm. A Router that only provides ONE Ethernet port on the back? That's pretty sad. But here is an inexpensive way to keep good network connectivity and give you more flexibility: Can you pick up one more device for your system?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a ... 6833127085

This is a simple Network Ethernet switch. The standard setup will be: MODEM -> New Ethernet Switch -> Telo / PCs / etc.

Just plug it in, and run a short CAT5 or better cable between this new Network Switch and the existing modem/router and then plug in your Telo and your PC nito two of the other four ports it provides you. You don't have to get this exact model, and you can buy it locally in a computer store if you wish. But having it in place should make everything happy.
#56186 by southsound
Thu May 20, 2010 3:13 pm
I also have a combined Actiontec DSL modem/router. Mine is the model GT701-WG with WiFi but they also make one without that is very similar. Actually, not too bad of a modem. I only use the wireless for my iPod Touch so it does not cause any problems with my Telo. I use a similar switch to the one that Soundjudgement recommended but mine has more ports - Netgear FS116. The combination works great. I have used my Telo both before and after the switch - in fact, when I still had my hub, I had the hub before the switch and the Telo after. With your DSL speeds, you might want to adjust the QoS on the Telo to 768kbps down and 384kbps down if you decide to keep the Telo where it is. If you are using it after the switch, it doesn't matter how the QoS is set. You might want to play with the QoS before buying the switch. Also remember that network switches are like hard drives - the one you buy is never large enough. I started out with a 5 port. Then got an 8 port. Now my FS116 is a 16 port. It is amazing how your network grows. I have two computers, my wife one, networked printers, networked music, Dish Network, one or two VoIP systems, etc.

You access the QoS setting by going to setup.ooma.com from a computer connected to the Home Network port. The QoS is on the Advanced tab. Also, if you are going to have your system set up like Soundjudgement recommends, you might want to creat a port forwarding rule that forwards Port 80 to 172.27.35.1 - the address of the built-in webserver. Then you can access the setup pages by going to the IP that your router assigns your Telo and you will not need to swap cables around to reach it.

Did we mention, Welcome to ooma and to the forum? :cool:
#56358 by surfpup
Sat May 22, 2010 11:24 am
Soundjudgment wrote:Hmmm. A Router that only provides ONE Ethernet port on the back? That's pretty sad.


This concerns me. Are you sure your cable modem/router is in fact a modem with a built-in firewall? Sometimes people mistakenly think that they have a firewall when in fact they are directly connecting to the internet on a public IP. You are then relying solely on your software firewall to protect your PC (and if it is a Windows PC, this is typically a bad idea).

If you do not have a true firewall on your modem/router, you could do the a few things:

A) Connect an inexpensive switch to your cable modem/router, then connect a real firewall to one of the switchports and the Ooma to the another switchport. Connect your computer to the new firewall. Your Ooma is now outside of your PC's network and will need to be configured by plugging your PC directly into the Home Port of the Ooma. You can get even more fancy and follow the instructions to disable DHCP and access your Ooma internally on my post at http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6697.

B) Connect a real firewall to your cable modem/router. These usually come with at least 4 network ports. Connect your PC to one port and your Ooma to the other. Your PC and your Ooma are now on the same internal network. Use the port forwarding trick to set up your Ooma so you can configure it.

C) Connect the Ooma to your cable modem/router and your PC to the Home port of the Ooma (your original configuration). Your Ooma is now acting as your firewall.

Good luck.
#56411 by southsound
Sat May 22, 2010 8:42 pm
surfpup wrote:This concerns me. Are you sure your cable modem/router is in fact a modem with a built-in firewall? Sometimes people mistakenly think that they have a firewall when in fact they are directly connecting to the internet on a public IP. You are then relying solely on your software firewall to protect your PC (and if it is a Windows PC, this is typically a bad idea).

If you do not have a true firewall on your modem/router, you could do the a few things:

A) Connect an inexpensive switch to your cable modem/router, then connect a real firewall to one of the switchports and the Ooma to the another switchport. Connect your computer to the new firewall. Your Ooma is now outside of your PC's network and will need to be configured by plugging your PC directly into the Home Port of the Ooma. You can get even more fancy and follow the instructions to disable DHCP and access your Ooma internally on my post at http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6697.

B) Connect a real firewall to your cable modem/router. These usually come with at least 4 network ports. Connect your PC to one port and your Ooma to the other. Your PC and your Ooma are now on the same internal network. Use the port forwarding trick to set up your Ooma so you can configure it.

C) Connect the Ooma to your cable modem/router and your PC to the Home port of the Ooma (your original configuration). Your Ooma is now acting as your firewall.

Good luck.

I'm a little confused by your post. Happy to see you on the forum, but have you bothered to read worldtraveler's original post? First, he/she does not have a cable modem. The ActionTec modem/router is a DSL unit. This is not a guess. I got this from reading the OP's statement: I have Qwest DSL and have an integrated Actiontec modem/router. And yes, the ActionTec does have a firewall built in.

The OP is not concerned about his modem/router having or not having a firewall but rather for options in connecting the ooma and PC. We have tried to address the options. So just what is the purpose of your post about firewalls and cable modems?
#56416 by Davesworld
Sat May 22, 2010 10:17 pm
I find that the Actiontec modems work great in bridge mode (dumb modem mode) while connected to the wan port of a good firewall/router although the built in one is adequate for the speeds you probably are getting.

OT but maybe useful to the topic:
I have a few Actiontecs, a 701 and a 704 as well as a westell 7500 that I am not using. I also have a Cisco 857 I have never even used but bought brand new a few years ago. The 701 was Quest branded but I used it on Verizon no problem. The 704 is Verizon branded but has 4 ports and uses the same processor as the 701 The westell is also one that verizon gave me when I moved. The Cisco 857 well, we all know that one is not branded to any carrier

What I am using now is a Cobalt Raq4i with a modified version of the IPCop firewall/router distro with a patched kernel to be able to boot up and run on Cobalt hardware which has no normal bios (My Raqcop project). I resoldered a few jumpers and am running a low voltage AMD K6-III at 1.8v core and clocked at 550mhz. A stock Raq4i runs with a 2v 450 K6-II. Raq3's are exacty the same hardware with a slower 300mhz K6-II. I went with a Traverse Viking ADSL 2+ PCI modem and am running it in the PCI slot of the Cobalt Raq. It is self contained and the system only sees it as a Realtek nic so you can actually log into the pci modem's own firmware. The benefit is that it uses system memory which is considerable compared to the built in ram of an external modem and having no extra external clutter, we have enough of that with ATAs, cordless phone bases and all that with their wall wart power supplies. I run the Traverse Viking in bridge mode as well. It's nice only having a phone cord going from the Raq4i to the Phone port on the wall. BTW, Sangoma also sells an identical PCI modem. I believe Conexant actually makes the board and supplies Sangoma and Traverse Technologies with the firmware. Now if only Verizon offered me 24mbs ADSL2+ that this hardware is capable of it'd be nice. Oh well.

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