This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#55012 by dioxide45
Sat May 08, 2010 9:23 am
When using our Ooma, it acts like a CB radio. People on each end can't speak at the same time without it cutting out and making it hard to understand. Everything seems fine when the person on the other end is talking, but if we It seems worse when both people are using speakerphone on both ends. If one person turns off the speakerphone, then it gets better.

Test results while Ooma is in use:
VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 0.0 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 0.8 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.0 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.2

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 2819344 bps
Upload speed: 554920 bps
Download quality of service: 85 %
Upload quality of service: 41 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 61 ms
Average download pause: 10 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 76 ms
Average round trip time to server: 76 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 4240000bps
Route concurrency: 1.503896
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 6898416bps

Test Reslts while Ooma is not in use:
VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 0.0 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 0.6 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.0 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.2

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 5150200 bps
Upload speed: 658296 bps
Download quality of service: 99 %
Upload quality of service: 99 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 99 ms
Average download pause: 5 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 76 ms
Average round trip time to server: 76 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 5150200bps
Route concurrency: 1.0
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 6898416bps
#55016 by murphy
Sat May 08, 2010 9:48 am
Do you have full duplex speakerphones?

Most speakerphones are half duplex.
If they weren't, with speakerphones at each end you would have a huge audio oscillator.

Full duplex speakerphones are very expensive.
#55044 by dioxide45
Sat May 08, 2010 4:22 pm
I am guessing it is only half duplex. We are using a Panasonic KX-TG2357 2.4GHz cordless phone. I don't know the phone on the other end. In the book it mentions a "Hands-free Digital Duplex Speakerphone". It also indicates for best performance to "Talk alternately with the other party in a quiet room".

We don't seem to have any issues with our traditional land line. Both parties can talk over each other with no noticeable issues. The problem only seems to happen with the Ooma and two speakerphones. Ooma calls to businesses where they would use a traditional phone don’t seem to have issues. Would the VOIP emphasize this issue more? The party on the other end is also using VOIP through TimeWarner. We have AT&T DSL Elite along with our Ooma.
#55049 by DTMF
Sat May 08, 2010 5:49 pm
Digital phone signals have higher latency than analog phone. It takes a measurable amount of time for the audio to be encoded at one end and decoded at the other end. That delay makes it harder to interrupt the person at the other end of the call. Using a half-duplex speakerphone that delay caused by latency would be magnified. It will get better in time as processing speeds improve in telephone devices and a larger portion of the connection between both ends of the call happens over fiber-optic lines.
#55066 by Davesworld
Sun May 09, 2010 1:10 am
DTMF wrote:Digital phone signals have higher latency than analog phone. It takes a measurable amount of time for the audio to be encoded at one end and decoded at the other end. That delay makes it harder to interrupt the person at the other end of the call. Using a half-duplex speakerphone that delay caused by latency would be magnified. It will get better in time as processing speeds improve in telephone devices and a larger portion of the connection between both ends of the call happens over fiber-optic lines.


It should not be a perceptible amount. Cellular to cellular has latency as does analog. Under 200ms it's imperceptible by all but the most trained ear. When it becomes noticeable, we're talking close to a second or more. Having said all that, I'm not sure if it's actual lag that the OP is complaining of but rather cutting out or muting. Ooma has made a lot of changes lately and hopefully not too many unintended side effects (bugs) are occurring.
#55068 by dioxide45
Sun May 09, 2010 4:35 am
It doesn't seem to be a lag issue that we are noticing. It is more of a muting or cutting out. If the other person is speaking and we try to speak at the same time, the person on the other end cuts out. The same happens on the other end when we are speaking and they try to interupt. We don't notice the muting or cutting out on a traditional land line with both using speakerphone, just on the Ooma with both using speakerphone.
#55077 by murphy
Sun May 09, 2010 9:54 am
dioxide45 wrote:It doesn't seem to be a lag issue that we are noticing. It is more of a muting or cutting out. If the other person is speaking and we try to speak at the same time, the person on the other end cuts out. The same happens on the other end when we are speaking and they try to interupt. We don't notice the muting or cutting out on a traditional land line with both using speakerphone, just on the Ooma with both using speakerphone.

The definition of half-duplex is that only one end can talk at a time. If you both talk at the same time, neither end will hear anything. That's the way speakerphones work. Try your test using regular phones.
#55099 by dioxide45
Sun May 09, 2010 3:52 pm
murphy wrote:
dioxide45 wrote:It doesn't seem to be a lag issue that we are noticing. It is more of a muting or cutting out. If the other person is speaking and we try to speak at the same time, the person on the other end cuts out. The same happens on the other end when we are speaking and they try to interupt. We don't notice the muting or cutting out on a traditional land line with both using speakerphone, just on the Ooma with both using speakerphone.

The definition of half-duplex is that only one end can talk at a time. If you both talk at the same time, neither end will hear anything. That's the way speakerphones work. Try your test using regular phones.


We have much better results when not using the speakerphone. Even if only one person is using speakerphone, it is much better. Why is this dual speakerphone not an issue when using a traditional land line, it only seems to cause problems when working through Ooma and Time Warner VOIP phone service.
#55142 by Oremus
Mon May 10, 2010 7:39 am
Although I am happy with the Ooma service, I have experienced some communication transmission delay for most of the entire six months that I've had the Telo. I've played with the QOS and pushed it up from the default 386 kb to 609 kb and added a download QOS of 2764 on my DSL without any noticeable improvement. This delay is observed with and without other users on my home network. Speed tests show a DSL speed of about 2.9 Mb down and .73 up with a latency of 23 ms.

My Telo is placed between my modem and my router. The modem does have some QOS settings but they are disabled by default. I didn't want to change them unless necessary.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests