This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#51941 by DMRNYC
Thu Apr 01, 2010 5:39 am
I am a new Ooma user, having call quality issues. My Telo is directly hooked up to my cable modem. Time Warner is my cable provider, and tests indicate my upstream comes in around 400+ (capacity 512) and downstream around 700 (capacity 768). Jitter is within acceptable levels (green in tests), but sometimes QOS drops to around low 80s.

If I were to subscribe to a premium bandwidth service through TW, I could increase my downstream capacity to 700 (and presume that I will receive about 600+) and my upstream to about 1.5. Would this increase my QOS? Or am I forced to live with my call quality issues.

BTW, the phone system I use is a Uniden wireless system, with the base attached to the Ooma and three additional phones. It is not DECT 6.0 (probably the prior generation).

Thank you,

David
#52005 by amoney
Thu Apr 01, 2010 5:19 pm
I would make the assumption if your getting jitter results in the 80 range, your still going to have jitter results if you upgrade your pipe and hence your may still very well have an issue possibly caused by that jitter. Note its not the size that matter, its the way it is used (efficency). Seriously though, a person can brag that they have the fastest speeds but VOIP is particularly dependent upon network efficency, as there are lots of smal packets streaming and and disruption will cause choppy etc issues.

Solutions would be to make sure you have a nice cable line (physically) and not split of at mutiple connection points shareing the house etc. Sometimes the issue was a cable modem that needed to be replaced. Note you would never know of an issue as other regular browsing and download do not get impacted as the packets can be resent etc. Note I do not believe your older wireless phone has anything to do with your issue, if you want to be sure try with a wired phone and see.
#52014 by JTalbert
Thu Apr 01, 2010 6:10 pm
There was a posting recently that someone else had the low level internet through their cable provider, and were having call problems, and someone commented that they were curious how they limited the speed, do the drop every other packet or what to limit the speed. The other user decided to bump up the internet to the next level up and that solved the problem, now they dont have any more problems with the phone.

Here is the other posting.
http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7269

Hope this helps.
#52075 by amoney
Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:32 am
JTalbert wrote:There was a posting recently that someone else had the low level internet through their cable provider, and were having call problems, and someone commented that they were curious how they limited the speed, do the drop every other packet or what to limit the speed. The other user decided to bump up the internet to the next level up and that solved the problem, now they dont have any more problems with the phone.

Here is the other posting.
http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7269

Hope this helps.



The ISP "cap" the broadband modem, its a confiuration setting on the allowable bandwidth a user can use, there are ways of "uncapping" ones own modem, but your asking for a world of hurt if the ISP catch you doing such.
#52078 by JTalbert
Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:59 am
amoney wrote:The ISP "cap" the broadband modem, its a confiuration setting on the allowable bandwidth a user can use, there are ways of "uncapping" ones own modem, but your asking for a world of hurt if the ISP catch you doing such.


I was not suggesting he do something illegal at all :-) I was just suggesting if he has basic level internet through his provider, if he called them and upgraded to the standard level, and pay for the standard level, than that could solve his problem as it seems to have done for the person from the forum that i linked.

Here is what the person said.
UPDATE: i just switched from Road Runner Lite to RR Standard. I wasn't sure if this would work, since I technically didn't have a bandwidth problem, but a jitter problem. Still, it appears that RR standard has cleared up my jitter problem. Here are my new VoIP speed test results:

jitter went from 100+ ms to 1.2 ms!! I haven't placed a call yet, but I hope this has solved my outgoing voice quality problem...
#52081 by southsound
Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:06 am
JTalbert wrote:
amoney wrote:The ISP "cap" the broadband modem, its a confiuration setting on the allowable bandwidth a user can use, there are ways of "uncapping" ones own modem, but your asking for a world of hurt if the ISP catch you doing such.


I was not suggesting he do something illegal at all :-) I was just suggesting if he has basic level internet through his provider, if he called them and upgraded to the standard level, and pay for the standard level, than that could solve his problem as it seems to have done for the person from the forum that i linked, or did I link the wrong thing. :o

Not at all - the poster, oats, merely had their ISP upgrade their service from Roadrunner Lite to Roadrunner Standard so you quote was right on. I am sure the ISP liked it because they got more revenue and the poster liked it because their ooma phone service worked better.

However, amoney makes a good point - don't attempt to "upgrade" your service yourself by modifying your modem. Technically possible - but something you just don't want to do because it is stealing. That kind of activity is just as wrong as removing the label from a piece of chuck steak and placing it on a filet before you check out.
#52086 by JTalbert
Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:40 am
southsound wrote:Not at all - the poster, oats, merely had their ISP upgrade their service from Roadrunner Lite to Roadrunner Standard so you quote was right on. I am sure the ISP liked it because they got more revenue and the poster liked it because their ooma phone service worked better.

However, amoney makes a good point - don't attempt to "upgrade" your service yourself by modifying your modem. Technically possible - but something you just don't want to do because it is stealing. That kind of activity is just as wrong as removing the label from a piece of chuck steak and placing it on a filet before you check out.



Ah I mis read and didnt realize there was a way to hack into the modem and uncap it. Just as I know there are ways to hack your cable box to get free cable. Its just not worth the consequences.

I dealt with my cable co early on to try to get them to look at my network, even though they did, it was only because I had a ace up my sleeve and had the email address to a local VP who reached out, with the prodding of my country government to resolve a problem I was having with my Tivo and SDV that Cox switched to.

But in the end, Cox did not do much to help me, they had a tech come out and he did do a few minor things that helped some, but I hated dealing with them.
#52147 by DMRNYC
Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:52 pm
Thank you all. It sounds as though the next step is increasing my download and upload streams. I will keep you posted to let you know if that works, although it may be a week or so before I do so.

I would never attempt to reengineer my cable modem to circumvent imposed restrictions, for the reasons mentioned by other posters.
#52228 by amoney
Sat Apr 03, 2010 5:57 pm
amoney wrote:
JTalbert wrote:There was a posting recently that someone else had the low level internet through their cable provider, and were having call problems, and someone commented that they were curious how they limited the speed, do the drop every other packet or what to limit the speed. The other user decided to bump up the internet to the next level up and that solved the problem, now they dont have any more problems with the phone.

Here is the other posting.
http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=7269

Hope this helps.



The ISP "cap" the broadband modem, its a confiuration setting on the allowable bandwidth a user can use, there are ways of "uncapping" ones own modem, but your asking for a world of hurt if the ISP catch you doing such.


I was just providing the explaination for informational purposes in regards to the question/statement marked in red. Sorry for any misunderstandings.

;-)

Best of luck with the upgrade.
#52550 by DMRNYC
Thu Apr 08, 2010 6:59 am
Quick update:

1. I have upgraded my bandwidth subscription through Time Warner Cable, with a new upload max amount of 750+mbps, which has definitely improved quality.

2. Time Warner Cable has confirmed that my cable modem is out of spec, and it is going to fix that with a repair visit this weekend. I have been told that QOS will improve once the modem is fixed.

Thanks all,

David in NYC

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