This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#43599 by nhandy007
Sat Jan 23, 2010 4:56 pm
Hello,

I've only had my Ooma system for about 20 days now. Initially I had significant issues with voice delays when using the system, but thanks to help from Groundhound, these issues were taken care of. During this initial trial period I subscribed to AT&T's FastAccess Ultra DSL (1.5mbps, 256kbps) and their basic telephone landline.

I've been pretty satisfied with the Ooma, and decided to cut off the landline service because I haven't used it since getting Ooma. During the initial Ooma setup I configured it to operate autonomously without the landline. I was assigned a brand new phone number also.

I assumed that cutting off my landline would not affect my Ooma, but immediately after AT&T cut off the landline and switched me to their FastAccess Direct DSL (1.5mbps, 256kbps) I noticed major call quality issues. I've noticed that I cannot hear the other person on the phone quite as good, but other people I've called have been completely unable to hear me at times.

When cutting off my landline, I assumed that my DSL service would be the same. Does anyone know if this is a normal problem? Also, if anyone has any suggestions on how to improve the quality of my calls, I'd sure like to hear them. Thanks!

Below are my VoIP Speed Test Results before and after the change was made:

Pre-Change Results:

VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 0.3 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 4.5 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.0 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.0

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 1627920 bps
Upload speed: 259128 bps
Download quality of service: 88 %
Upload quality of service: 99 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 222 ms
Average download pause: 7 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 82 ms
Average round trip time to server: 84 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 1627920bps
Route concurrency: 1.0
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 6393656bps

Post-change Results:

VoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 2.0 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 3.8 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.2 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 3.9

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 1627488 bps
Upload speed: 258856 bps
Download quality of service: 87 %
Upload quality of service: 99 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 224 ms
Average download pause: 7 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 85 ms
Average round trip time to server: 93 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 1627488bps
Route concurrency: 1.0
Download TCP forced idle: 0 %
Maximum route speed: 6168000bps
#43606 by DTMF
Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:35 pm
An AT&T rep told me when I was considering doing what you did that their DSL performs much better when it is associated with a phone line than it does as a dry loop. Sounds like that may be what you're finding out. You could always reconnect your AT&T landline with measured-rate service for about $20/month with taxes and fees.
#43617 by sfhub
Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:34 pm
When you cut the landline phone, they sometimes can switch you to a different circuit and you could have a different path to the DSl equipment so new problems can arise. In that case any testing you did earlier wouldn't necessarily be relevant anymore.

Any packet loss is especially bad, but a small amount of packet loss shouldn't result in the other party completely not being able to hear you. Does that happen all the time or just sometimes?

There's always some chance the problem is on Ooma's end and coincidentally happened around the time of your conversion. Not saying that is definitely what is happening, just putting it out there to be considered.
#43622 by southsound
Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:53 pm
DTMF wrote:An AT&T rep told me when I was considering doing what you did that their DSL performs much better when it is associated with a phone line than it does as a dry loop. Sounds like that may be what you're finding out. You could always reconnect your AT&T landline with measured-rate service for about $20/month with taxes and fees.

That, my friend, is a line of what I would call marketing garbage! There is no reason that a dry loop DSL would perform worse than one associated with a POTS line. In fact, depending on the load of phones on your POTS line, it might actually perform better. I think AT&Fee is just trying to get more revenue. As and old telco employee (now reformed, thank you) I am amazed and embarrased that they would try this stunt.

sfhub wrote:When you cut the landline phone, they sometimes can switch you to a different circuit and you could have a different path to the DSl equipment so new problems can arise. In that case any testing you did earlier wouldn't necessarily be relevant anymore.

There's always some chance the problem is on Ooma's end and coincidentally happened around the time of your conversion. Not saying that is definitely what is happening, just putting it out there to be considered.

Good thoughts. Just in case the line quality has gone out of spec, re-testing it would be a great idea. Your telco may also have a special site they want you to use to ckeck line quality. Although it will not be as good as the test you have already been doing (that checks the line for VOIP quality) it can tell you if the connection is within spec. I believe that they promise 80% of the rated speed.
#43625 by nhandy007
Sat Jan 23, 2010 8:34 pm
- DTMF
I wouldn't put it past AT&T to somehow try to punish the customer who cuts off service with them. I was quite shocked to discover these problems after cutting off the landline. In retrospect, it was pretty dumb. I had gotten on a promotion where I got to keep basic land line service for $3 a month plus fees. I just wasn't using it at all and did not think that it would cause a change in my Internet service.

- sfhub
The test results don't indicate that I should be having this bad of service, but I really have not been able to use my Ooma phone at all. I occasionally will experience difficulty hearing the other caller, but they describe that my words are so jumbled and garbled they I'm impossible to understand at times. I've experienced this calling a landline, cell phone, and corporate customer service center.

I did wonder about Ooma's end. I'm planning on contacting them on Monday to see if they know anything.

- southsound
I wouldn't put anything past AT&T these days. Part of the reason I wanted an Ooma was so that I could stop having to call AT&T every month to correct my bill. The past 4 months they had overcharged me terribly. I was having bills of $180 when it was supposed to be about $70.

Are you referring to tests like speakeasy? This was the website that the AT&T technician initially directed me to for line tests when setting up. My speeds on there test greater than the minimum guarantees of 1.5mbps and 256kbps.

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