This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#94629 by EX Bell
Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:20 am
Interesting, but I don't think crosstalk is the issue here since the phone port on the Telo only uses one of the two pair of wires and the static changes when he moves the cord. That doesn't happen with crosstalk, it's always there no matter how the cord is positioned.
#94645 by Cyberchat
Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:14 pm
EX Bell wrote:Interesting, but I don't think crosstalk is the issue here since the phone port on the Telo only uses one of the two pair of wires and the static changes when he moves the cord. That doesn't happen with crosstalk, it's always there no matter how the cord is positioned.


EX Bell,

The crosstalk description in my previous message is just part of the product description associated with the link I sent to Ibmofo.

From Ibmofo's description of being able to move his phone cord and/or the OOMA device to cause a variance in the sound of static in his phones, it sounds more like moving wiring or circuit boards through a field of energy rather than crosstalk within the phone cord. Original telephone wiring in older houses without twisted pairs and phone cords without twisted pairs (like most phone cords are constructed) can act like antennas. If there are strong energy fields in the vicinity of the wiring (which can be caused by a number of sources like data transmissions over powerlines, short-wave radios, broadcasts, a number of wireless devices, electronic devices, computers, transformers, motors, etc.) untwisted pair telephone wiring can be the source of a lot of noise in telephone handsets.
#94709 by whydavewhy
Sat Apr 07, 2012 4:44 pm
Thanks for all your detailed responses to the hiss problem on my Ooma Telo. I had the CAT5 cable going from the Ooma "To Internet" port to a LAN port on my Apple Time Capsule; I unplugged it from the Time Capsule and plugged it into a LAN port on my Verizon FiOS router instead, but the noise remained. I tried eliminating the Apple Time Capsule altogether, by turning it off and unplugging it from everything, then rebooting the Ooma and Verizon router, but the noise remained. I am not using a power strip and have the devices plugged directly into wall outlets. I have not tried using "twisted pair" telephone cable, but the sound quality does not vary with cord movement or moving devices away from each other.

Ooma Support told me that with my current configuration, the Verizon router is considered the modem, and the Apple Time Capsule is considered the router. With the Ooma Telo "To Internet" port connected to the first LAN (Ethernet) port of the Verizon router, and the Apple Time Capsule WAN port connected to the second LAN port of the Verizon router, the Ooma is considered as being "after" the router (so both the download and upload speeds are set to '0' in the Ooma online settings). I had also tried having the Ooma between the two routers (with no change in noise), but the downside was that if I turned off the Ooma, I lost the Internet connection for everything else.

Some people mentioned trying a router with "QoS" (Quality of Service) capability. The Verizon router I am using does have this capability, which is the main reason I tried hooking the Ooma directly to it in this last configuration...

When I went into the Advanced settings on the Verizon Web site to select a profile for the Verizon router's "QoS," I chose the profile called "Triple Play User." It described this profile as, "I use VoIP applications and video streaming. I want these applications to be as fast as possible."

VoIP (SIP, H323): High
Video: High-Medium
HTTP/HTTPS: Medium
Other: Low

But it also asked me to set the WAN device's Bandwidth (Rx/Tx), and would not let me save the settings until this was done.

So unfortunately, it looks like the QoS function only applies to the WAN port, which the Ooma does not use, so I'm not sure why people are saying that this capability can help with voice quality on the Ooma. (Unless there is some sort of configuration I could use where the WAN port of the Verizon connects to the "Home Network" port of the Ooma?)

The constant crackling/sizzling/hissing noise in the background is not a deal-breaker; it just sounds like someone is frying fish while I'm on the phone. It is not a "cycling noise" or a 60 Hz hum. As I said in my first post, my Ooma Telo is working properly as far as telephony goes, it is just not the crystal clear quality that most owners seem to be describing.
#94710 by thunderbird
Sat Apr 07, 2012 5:27 pm
whydavewhy:
Since you have tried two Ooma Telos, and both have the "Hiss (Noise)", something in your home's environment is causing the problem.

You didn't mention if you tested using only a corded phone, not connected to your home's phone wiring, with all of the Wireless phone bases in your home unpowered. Some Wireless phone bases have caused "noise" in the Ooma Telo, even if the Wireless phone base phone wire is disconnected or is connected to another phone line like AT&T.

Since you tested with the Apple Router unpowered and there was no difference, it just may be the Verizon Router that is causing the problem. If you rent the Verizon Router, get another Router from Verizon, or borrow a Router or etc.

Also think of any other Electrical/Electronic device in your home that could be radiating a signal to the Ooma Telo, like a defective fluorescent light ballast.
#94746 by EX Bell
Sun Apr 08, 2012 7:35 pm
whydavewhy wrote:...But it also asked me to set the WAN device's Bandwidth (Rx/Tx), and would not let me save the settings until this was done.

So unfortunately, it looks like the QoS function only applies to the WAN port, which the Ooma does not use, so I'm not sure why people are saying that this capability can help with voice quality on the Ooma. (Unless there is some sort of configuration I could use where the WAN port of the Verizon connects to the "Home Network" port of the Ooma?)

The constant crackling/sizzling/hissing noise in the background is not a deal-breaker; it just sounds like someone is frying fish while I'm on the phone. It is not a "cycling noise" or a 60 Hz hum. As I said in my first post, my Ooma Telo is working properly as far as telephony goes, it is just not the crystal clear quality that most owners seem to be describing.


Actually Thunderbird, he said in the original post that he has his Panasonic DECT 6.0 base connected directly to the Telo and he also tried a corded phone connected directly to the Telo.

whydavewhy, did you try a different cord from the Telo to the Panasonic base or the corded phone? The way you describe the sound, seems like a bad connection, so maybe the phone cord between the Telo and the phones you are testing is faulty. If this suggestion does not resolve the issue, Thunderbird's suggestion of the router having a fault or interference from a nearby device is also plausible. Can you take either of your Telos or both to a friends house with adequate internet service and test if the crackling noise goes away?

In regard to the QoS settings, 0 for both upload and download on the Telo is correct when it's after the router. Since your Verizon modem is also a router, the Telo should have the QoS set to 0 for both and you should configure QoS in the Verizon Westell modem/router combo unit. I had a look at the manual and it actually has a pretty sophisticated QoS setup. I think you can do what you need by first measuring your max download and upload speed using speedtest.net and writing down the results. Next, on page 153 of the Westell manual, it shows what you will see in the Verizon router setup. Where it's labelled "WAN Devices Bandwidth (Rx/Tx):", set it to "User Defined" and then enter the Max speed you recorded for download from speedtest.net in the Rx field. In the Tx field, enter the Max speed you recorded for upload from speedtest.net, but first multiply it by 0.8 to get 80% of the total upload speed. Now select the bullet at the bottom of the screen that reads "Priority By Host" and enter the MAC address of the Telo "Internet" Port in the field labelled "High Priority Host".

According to page 154 of the Westell manual, "QoS can be configured using flexible rules, according to the following parameters:
• Source/destination IP address, MAC address, or host name".

Since all three methods are acceptable, MAC address is the preferred method because it will reserve the required bandwidth specifically for the Telo Internet Port when it needs it. The MAC address of the Telo Internet Port can be found either on the "Internet" tab of the Telo setup page, or it will be the same as the MAC address on the bottom of your Telo, except that it will be one greater. For example, if your Telo shows 08:86:3b:89:4d:57 on the bottom, this will be the MAC address of the Home Port, so the MAC address of the Internet Port would be 08:86:3b:89:4d:58. I'm not certain because the Westell 9100EM manual doesn't go into detail about it, but you should be able to leave the "Low Priority Host" field blank, since "Other" devices below that field will default to Low.

In practice, this should normally give your other devices connected to the Apple Router, full download speed except when the Telo needs to use some of the bandwidth, and it will give 80% of your total upload speed to other devices, except when the Telo is in use. Again, this is not related to your crackling noise, but once you get that resolved, you will want to have these QoS settings in your router to prevent other voice quality issues from occurring.
#94749 by thunderbird
Sun Apr 08, 2012 10:26 pm
EX Bell wrote:Actually Thunderbird, he said in the original post that he has his Panasonic DECT 6.0 base connected directly to the Telo and he also tried a corded phone connected directly to the Telo.

And with the wireless phone bases disconnected? Some times Wireless phones bases in the home will cause "noise" in the Ooma Telo, when the base is powered, even if the phone line is disconnected from the Ooma Telo Phone port.
#94751 by EX Bell
Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:38 am
thunderbird wrote:
EX Bell wrote:Actually Thunderbird, he said in the original post that he has his Panasonic DECT 6.0 base connected directly to the Telo and he also tried a corded phone connected directly to the Telo.

And with the wireless phone bases disconnected? Some times Wireless phones bases in the home will cause "noise" in the Ooma Telo, when the base is powered, even if the phone line is disconnected from the Ooma Telo Phone port.


I suppose it's not out of the realm of possibility, everything breaks after all, but I've never heard of a disconnected Panasonic cordless phone, let alone one of the newer DECT 6.0 types causing a "constant crackling/sizzling/hissing noise in the background", have you? You're correct, in that nothing should be disregarded when it comes to troubleshooting, but I'd be very surprised to learn that a disconnected, but powered Panasonic cordless phone was the culprit of such noise.
#94752 by thunderbird
Mon Apr 09, 2012 5:20 am
EX Bell wrote:
thunderbird wrote:
EX Bell wrote:Actually Thunderbird, he said in the original post that he has his Panasonic DECT 6.0 base connected directly to the Telo and he also tried a corded phone connected directly to the Telo.

And with the wireless phone bases disconnected? Some times Wireless phones bases in the home will cause "noise" in the Ooma Telo, when the base is powered, even if the phone line is disconnected from the Ooma Telo Phone port.


I suppose it's not out of the realm of possibility, everything breaks after all, but I've never heard of a disconnected Panasonic cordless phone, let alone one of the newer DECT 6.0 types causing a "constant crackling/sizzling/hissing noise in the background", have you? You're correct, in that nothing should be disregarded when it comes to troubleshooting, but I'd be very surprised to learn that a disconnected, but powered Panasonic cordless phone was the culprit of such noise.

Yes in the past, several times, an older or defective wireless phone base, even if disconnected, can/will cause problems with Ooma Devices. whydavewhy never mentioned it, but who is to say that whydavewhy isn't using another/other wireless phone system(s), other than Panasonic, in his home, along with another phone service? Some people on this forum will use several other phone services, for various reasons.

I know about problems with a defective wireless phone base from first had experience.

Also see the last post in thread: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=13478 , for strange effects that devices that are connected to the Ooma phone port have.

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