This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#80879 by thunderbird
Sat May 07, 2011 11:36 am
8587925758 wrote:Quality is now 83%. I went to both the attic and the cable box outside. Noticed they had db signal strength splitters on the line. I removed the splitters at the box and in the attic and re-coupled, making a true home line. Currently is now working

FYI, Should I still change the OOMA setting to include my Router IP address in the DMZ?

Will

I would give it a try the way it is now. If you continue to have problems post back with those problems and someone will give you more suggestions.
#80886 by tomcat
Sat May 07, 2011 7:02 pm
nn5i wrote:
8587925758 wrote:Should I still change the OOMA setting to include my Router IP address in the DMZ?

Will

I wouldn't. But then I've always wondered why anyone recommends that anyway.

Here's a thread on that topic. viewtopic.php?f=9&t=11131
#80892 by nn5i
Sun May 08, 2011 5:33 am
Excellent. Thank you, Tomcat. I had not seen that thread. I stand confirmed in my view that (1) there is never a reason to put Ooma in a DMZ, and many reasons not to; (2) there is never a reason to give Ooma a static IP, but no particular reason not to if you feel like it; and (3) there is never a reason to put Ooma in front of a router, and some cogent arguments against it.

If it seems, in a particular case, that Ooma needs to be in a DMZ, there's something wrong. Find it, and fix it. Don't open it up to the world.

If it seems, in a particular case, that Ooma needs a static IP, probably something else is wrong. Me, I'd try to find it and fix it, just because static IPs are sometimes a pain. But the static IP is at least harmless (except for making your network inconvenient to maintain).

If it seems, in a particular case, that Ooma needs to be in front of a router instead of behind it, the issue is almost certainly to obtain a QoS guarantee for Ooma. Learning to use your router's QoS settings isn't measurably harder (usually) than learning to use Ooma's QoS. If your router's QoS doesn't work very well, solve that problem instead of placing your inadequate router (and your whole network!) behind Ooma's crippleware router (a course that also usually introducees double NAT for your whole network).

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