This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#76954 by webdog2010
Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:24 pm
I've been using an Ooma Telo since the end of January. My number ported last week and I have been distributing Ooma dial tone through my house wiring since last Saturday, 3/5/2011. The only quality issue I've encountered has been a slight delay, worse when the Telo was behind the router. It's not bad, but it is there and quite noticeable compared to the old landline, but it's not a deal breaker.

I've noticed over the past few days that I'm only experiencing the delay when I use one of my cordless DECT 6.0 handsets. If however I'm using one of my vintage phones, there is no delay...NONE. I have four vintage phones currently connected; a Western Electric 2500 (touchtone), Western Electric 2554 (touchtone), Western Electric 702BM Princess (rotary - for receiving calls only) and an Automatic Electric 90 (also rotary). I can't explain it, but I suspect it has to do with the build quality of the older units and the circuit design of their internal networks. These phones were built to last indefinitely in the field during the old Ma Bell days. Most of them will probably outlast me.

I'm curious if anyone else has noticed similar behavior with vintage vs. modern phones through their Ooma? Thought I'd bring this up as a possible solution to those who seem to be experiencing delay issues with their Ooma. If you have an old pre-Ma Bell breakup phone lying around or can get your hands on one easily and cheaply, it might be something to consider trying. Perhaps I just got lucky and this may not make a difference to anyone else, but in my case at least, my vintage phones are making my Ooma connection sound just like my old ATT landline.
#76956 by Bill D
Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:45 pm
I also have excessive delay issues that I don't understand, so I'll try to find an old phone to test with. Can't imagine why it would be better than my old trusty 5.8 GHz Uniden 9-handset 2-line system, but who knows?

Have you tried measuring your delay? The method using Audacity is described here:
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=9569&hilit=Audacity&start=30#p67874

The monster thread that includes that post has endless dialog about delay.

I've had 3 Ooma hubs for well over a year and my only problem has been recently increasing delay.
#76958 by thunderbird
Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:56 am
webdog2010:
This is the first time I've heard about delay difference between a vintage phone and a DECT 6 phone. What is the brand and model number of your DECT 6 phone?

I have an old Slimline corded vintage phone that tested with no echo or delay, and was much better, than my old cordless GE 5.8 GHz phones. That was the tiping point, causing me to purchase Panasonic DECT 6 Plus phones.

Follows is an experience I had over the weekend using 5.8 GHz and DECT 6 phones together. Notice that I had to remove power from the cordless GE 5.8 GHz phone base before the echo stopped.

Information Only:
I was using a G. E. Model 25942EE4-C 5.8 GHz cordless phone set when I started using Ooma as our home's phone provider. I was having delay and echo problems so I purchased and installed a Panasonic KX-TG6544B DECT 6.0 PLUS set of cordless phones. The Panasonic DECT 6 Plus cordless phones mostly cured our delay and echo problems. (I did other things/adjustments that helped also).
Saturday I saw the old G. E. 5.8 GHz box, so I took the base and one phone and connected it to our homes phone wiring in the basement, in addition to the existing DECT 6 Plus phones. Sunday morning when my wife was making phone calls to China, she complained about having a echo, heard only on her end of the call. I went downstairs and disconnected the phone line to the Cordless G. E. 5.8 GHz Base. Echo was still present. Than I removed power from the G. E. cordless 5.8 GHz base and the echo went away.

Wikipedia Says:
"Some cordless phones advertised as 5.8 GHz actually transmit from base to phone on 5.8 GHz and transmit from phone to base on 2.4 GHz or 900 MHz, to conserve battery life inside the phone."

Vabout.com Says: http://voip.about.com/od/voipbasics/a/f ... uality.htm
"Phone frequencies
The frequency of your IP phone may cause interference with other VoIP equipment. There are many cases where people using 5.8 GHz phones have been getting voice quality problems. When all troubleshooting tricks failed, changing the phone to one with a lower frequency (e.g. 2.4 GHz) solved the problem."

Epinions says: http://www.epinions.com/content_1277730948
"What's with the new DECT?
As I've alluded to above, the new DECT phones are often confused with being 6Ghz phones due to the "DECT 6.0' label on the boxes. The DECT phones operate in the unregulated 1.9Ghz frequency, where devices have to negotiate amongst themselves for air time. Right now, the main advantages of the 1.9Ghz range is it does not overlap with computer WiFi signals (2.4Ghz) and is far enough away from microwave signals that your 20 year old leaky microwave won't shut it down. DECT phones will have a better 'real world' range because of this, and won't jam up your home Wireless B/G/N router. The security measures on DECT are solid, but as I've said before, if you've got the equipment to crack any digital signal, you're probably NASA.

In short, DECT is the no-brainer choice for most people. The phones are feature-rich and the play well with others."

This is what I posted on another thread for testing:
The other thing to try is to call using a single corded phone connected to the phone port of your Ooma device, with nothing else connected.
All cordless phones must be disconnected from power when you try this test, including the cordless phone base. (Certain cordless phone will interfere with Ooma and Wi-Fi, even if the phone line is diconnected from the cordless phone. As long as the cordless phone is still connected to power, QoS problems can occur, caused by the cordless phone system).
#76961 by danlisman
Fri Mar 11, 2011 5:36 am
Follows is an experience I had over the weekend using 5.8 GHz and DECT 6 phones together. Notice that I had to remove power from the cordless GE 5.8 GHz phone base before the echo stopped.

Thunderbird,
I just want to be sure I understand the theory behind your experience. You are only saying that there could be a wireless issue between wireless phones or wireless devices.
If you operate your 5.8 phone and DECT phone and a corded phone at the same time, the corded phone would never be affected. Right??
#76962 by thunderbird
Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:00 am
danlisman wrote:
Follows is an experience I had over the weekend using 5.8 GHz and DECT 6 phones together. Notice that I had to remove power from the cordless GE 5.8 GHz phone base before the echo stopped.

Thunderbird,
I just want to be sure I understand the theory behind your experience. You are only saying that there could be a wireless issue between wireless phones or wireless devices.
If you operate your 5.8 phone and DECT phone and a corded phone at the same time, the corded phone would never be affected. Right??


"I just want to be sure I understand the theory behind your experience. You are only saying that there could be a wireless issue between wireless phones or wireless devices."
In my case that's true. There was a wireless issue between my 5.8 GHz wireless phone and wireless devices, either the Ooma Telo or my Router/Wi-Fi, I don't know which.

I never tested with the Wi-Fi off.

I never tested using a corded phone, while a dect 6 and 5.8 GHz phone was powered in the house. I have tested using a corded Slimline phone with a DECT 6 phone. Using that combination they both work fine.

I'm going to be busy this weekend but next week I'll try to test with other combinations.
#76963 by danlisman
Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:45 am
and wireless devices, either the Ooma Telo or my Router/Wi-Fi, I don't know which.

Since my Ooma Telo has neither wireless input nor wireless output, I don't see why it is included in your suspect list. I do not have the Ooma phones. Is there a wireless connection between Telo and Ooma phone?
#76965 by thunderbird
Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:00 am
danlisman:
How does the Ooma Telo wireless handsets communicate with the Ooma Telo? And if an Ooma Bluetooth Adapter is plugged into the Ooma Telo, how does it communicate with a cell phone? Of coarse they are wireless connections.

Ooma Telo handset use DECT 6.

Ooma: https://www.ooma.com/support/knowledgeba ... etooth-faq
Q: What frequency does Bluetooth operate at?
A: Bluetooth operates in the unlicensed frequency band of 2.4 GHz. Other home devices that use or emit at this frequency band include Wi-Fi (b/g/n), 2.4 GHz cordless phones, some baby monitors and even microwave ovens. For best reception and range, we recommend that you keep these other devices as far away from the Bluetooth Adapter as possible.
Last edited by thunderbird on Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:21 am, edited 2 times in total.
#76966 by danlisman
Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:18 am
thunderbird wrote:danlisman:
How does the Ooma Telo wireless handsets communicate with the Ooma Telo? And if an Ooma Bluetooth Adapter is plugged into the Ooma Telo, how does it communicate with a cell phone? Of coarse they are wireless connections.

I have my Telo connected to house wiring with corded and DECT phones connected to house wiring. If Telo is puting out a wireless signal, it would be good to have the ability to turn it off. Is that an option?
#76967 by thunderbird
Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:27 am
danlisman wrote:
thunderbird wrote:danlisman:
How does the Ooma Telo wireless handsets communicate with the Ooma Telo? And if an Ooma Bluetooth Adapter is plugged into the Ooma Telo, how does it communicate with a cell phone? Of coarse they are wireless connections.

I have my Telo connected to house wiring with corded and DECT phones connected to house wiring. If Telo is puting out a wireless signal, it would be good to have the ability to turn it off. Is that an option?


You'd have to contact Ooma support to have that question answered.

More than likely if you are using cordless DECT 6 phones, there probably wouldn't be any conflict anyway.
#76969 by webdog2010
Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:03 am
During my testing phase (pre-number port) I was using the cordless phones exclusively with the Ooma. I'm using VTech CS6319 DECT 6.0 phones, purchased to use with the Ooma. I never used them on my landline, so I can't comment on how they acted in that environment. During the testing phase I did check my delay using the prescribed method and consistently measured delay times around 450ms. I tried to test delay this morning with the WE2554, but without speaker capability I can't pick up the return echo with my microphone. Subjectively, the delay is vastly reduced. With the cordless phone, it goes something like this:

Test 1...2...3. Test

With the vintage phone, either connected through the house wiring or directly to the Ooma:

Test 1... Test

I know that's a crude method to try and illustrate what I'm hearing, but it's the best I can come up with. I might add that my wife also hears the difference between using the cordless and vintage phones (without any prodding from me.)

And to be clear, the DECT phones are connected to the line and powered while using the vintage phones. Having them connected and powered does not have a negative impact on the vintage phones. I am curious how a modern corded phone would behave, but I don't have anything newer than 1978.

It may not be that the vintage phones have anything to do with the reduced delay. It may simply be that the delay I'm hearing is a by-product of the DECT phones and has nothing to do with the Ooma itself. Again, this scenario may not play out the same for everyone, and other's delay problems may be completely unrelated, but I didn't remember seeing any reference to delay while using vintage vs. cordless phones in the forum. In the short time I've had Ooma I've gleaned a lot of knowledge from the folks here and I just wanted to give a little something back that might be useful to someone else.

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