This forum includes tips for maintaining the best audio quality possible with the Ooma System. If your Ooma system is having issues with dropped calls, static audio or echo, look here for assistance.
#72558 by nibes
Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:24 pm
lbmofo - thanks again.

So - we'll see. I got the phone you recommended today, and at first blush, it may be a solution. I've only made one call due to needing to wait for the batteries to charge up, but it was excellent. Here's hoping!

Now - I wonder if there was also some kind of interference with all Ooma calls since the RF is flying around the same house. Wouldn't that be a great thing to know about, and an easy way to solve it.

Here's hoping that your cold winter gives way to a beautiful spring. I'm in central CA and altho it is cold and foggy, it's not like you've got.
#72570 by lbmofo
Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:11 am
Thanks. It has been unusually cold here this year...a lot of days in the 30s; seen some 20s and teens too. As long as we don't have to deal with a minus sign, I am okay :)
#72575 by thunderbird
Sun Jan 09, 2011 6:31 am
Nibes Wrote:
“Now - I wonder if there was also some kind of interference with all Ooma calls since the RF is flying around the same house. Wouldn't that be a great thing to know about, and an easy way to solve it.”



Interference Ooma:
When having problems with Ooma calls, one thing that we forget to look at is the Internet network cables coming into the house to the Modem, from the Modem to the Ooma device, or from the Modem to the Router and than the Ooma device.
Many times those unshielded network cables cross, are routed along side, or are tangled with power wires or power cords. Not to be forgotten are unshielded network cables that are routed next to, or cross power wires routed inside of the home’s walls.

VoIP does “not like interference” from power wires.

Nose and static are the most common problems caused by routing unshielded network cables to close to power wires. But to a lesser extent, interruptions and delay can be caused by routing unshielded network cables to close to power wires or power cords.

Unshielded network cables should be isolated and routed away from power wires and power cables as much as possible.

The best solution, if possible, is to replace the network cables, which enter the house and connect eventually to the Ooma device with 100% shielded network cables.

The second thing that we forget to look at is the interference that is picked up by routing the phone cords/phone wires too close to power wires and power cords. This includes phone cords or phone wires in the homes walls, which cross or are routed along side of power wires.

Phone cords/wires should also be isolated and routed away from power wires and power cables as much as possible. Phone wires routed in the homes walls, if possible, should be shielded phone wires.
#72576 by Davesworld
Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:09 am
So we're blaming phone cords for known systemic problems now? You have a short piece of analog cord from your Ooma to your phone. Trust me, an analog phone cord several feet long does not miraculously act as an oscillating digital store and forward device when no digital data is between your phone and your Ooma nor does it in any way contribute to DTMF talk off or excessive lag, choppiness, one way audio etc. It's like trying to treat a ruptured appendix with a lollipop.
#72584 by nibes
Sun Jan 09, 2011 11:12 am
Interesting post from Thunderbird. That may all be very true, but I don't think it would account for the intermittent quality. Wouldn't it be a problem all the time or not at all? Why would I have excellent quality at times, and nearly unusable quality at others? And why would my corded phone, which sits on my desk directly next to Ooma and my Router work a whole lot better than the cordless whose base station is in the next room, completely separate from the wire jungle on my desk? AND - who would pull drywall off their interior walls and redo phone wiring just to be able to use Ooma?

I'm too old and wise to say my problem is completely solved, but on the basis of a few calls with none of the issues I faced before, I'm thinking the DECT 6.0 has saved me from going back to Ma Bell.

Which is really funny. Twice I called AT&T to port my number back and I was on hold so long that I hung up.

Funny how things happen!
#72590 by lbmofo
Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:44 pm
Good, so far, DECT 6.0 seems to have rectified your situation?! Great. The 5.8Ghz phone was the first thing I thought of when you mentioned that wired phone worked good.
#73328 by nibes
Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:02 pm
After a few weeks now, yes, replacing the 5.8 ghz phones with the DECT 6.0 has solved the problem. I'm not thrilled with the panasonic's features, but that's a whole different issue.
#73406 by dray1
Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:37 pm
Please help. I have had the same stutter issue. During calls, I her a stutter and I miss part of words. Happens throughout call, sometimes worse than others. I have gone through all of the forum topics and tried all the different set-up scenarios. Modem and router are in garage. Telo is in house. I thought it might be the router since it is older and does not have any qos settings. so I tried to set the telo up directly to the modem, no change. I even tried a corded phone to see if it was my older phones. No change. When i do the speed checks and the other voip check, everything is mostly ok (it does seem to change different times I check), but consistently the quality of service is low. any suggestions?

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