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#68889 by kc8
Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:32 am
I had originally installed my Ooma behind my wireless router without issue. I recently moved my wireless router from my home office to a different part of the house to get better wireless coverage. I did not want to move my cable modem or Ooma from my home office. Now I have my cable modem connected to my Ooma, the Home port of my Ooma connected to an 8 port switch. I have my office PC, printer, etc. connected to this 8 port switch. The equipment in my home office get their IP addresses from the Ooma 172.27.35.XXX. I also have a cable that runs from the 8 port switch to the wireless router in my family room. The wireless router gets it's WAN IP address from the Ooma and the devices that connect to the wireless router get 192.168.0.xxx addresses from the wireless router.
I have read that I can use the wireless router as an access point by plugging the cable from the Ooma into a Lan port instead of the WAN port, turning off DHCP and NAT on the wireless router. When I do this my wireless bandwidth gets cut in half, from 300mbps to 150mbps. I'm assuming this is because the wireless router is now acting as a repeater when set up this way.
I left the Ooma cable plugged into the WAN port and left the wireless router with DHCP and NAT enabled to keep my wireless speed high. I have not tried to communicate from a PC on 172.27.35.xxx to a PC on 198.168.0.xxx yet.
My questions:
How good is Ooma as the primary network security device?
Would my network be more secure with a second router either in front of or behind my Ooma? (I have not had a problem with voice quality with my Ooma behind my router.)
Any suggestions for a change in setup to maximize security, PC to PC communication and wireless speed?
Thanks.
kc8
#68930 by nn5i
Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:17 pm
kc8 wrote:I had originally installed my Ooma behind my wireless router without issue. I recently moved my wireless router from my home office to a different part of the house to get better wireless coverage. I did not want to move my cable modem or Ooma from my home office. Now I have my cable modem connected to my Ooma, the Home port of my Ooma connected to an 8 port switch. I have my office PC, printer, etc. connected to this 8 port switch. The equipment in my home office [gets its] IP addresses from the Ooma 172.27.35.XXX. I also have a cable that runs from the 8 port switch to the wireless router in my family room. The wireless router gets [its] WAN IP address from the Ooma and the devices that connect to the wireless router get 192.168.0.xxx addresses from the wireless router.
I have read that I can use the wireless router as an access point by plugging the cable from the Ooma into a Lan port instead of the WAN port, turning off DHCP and NAT on the wireless router. When I do this my wireless bandwidth gets cut in half, from 300mbps to 150mbps. I'm assuming this is because the wireless router is now acting as a repeater when set up this way.
I left the Ooma cable plugged into the WAN port and left the wireless router with DHCP and NAT enabled to keep my wireless speed high. I have not tried to communicate from a PC on 172.27.35.xxx to a PC on 198.168.0.xxx yet.
My questions:
How good is Ooma as the primary network security device?
Would my network be more secure with a second router either in front of or behind my Ooma? (I have not had a problem with voice quality with my Ooma behind my router.)
Any suggestions for a change in setup to maximize security, PC to PC communication and wireless speed?
Thanks.
kc8

There's some information missing: how fast is the switch (10baseT, 100baseTX, gigabit)? Is it really a switch, or is it actually a hub? How fast is the router (802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n)? But actually it must be 802.11n to get reported speeds as high as those you quote.

Is your wireless network a mixed one, or is every device an 802.11n device?

Most important, how are you measuring the speed? Many routers report speed inaccurately: they report a calculated maximum speed rather than the actual speed at which the subnet is running. I'd wager a modest sum that the speed isn't actually changing significantly, but that the reported speed is calculated as if the router were acting as a repeater because the firmware doesn't know any better. It certainly does not operate as a repeater in either of the configurations you describe. It's a repeater if it receives a wireless packet and retransmits it -- but it's not doing that. It's receiving wired packets and transmitting them wirelessly, and it's receiving wireless packets and retransmitting over a wire. In neither case does it use the radio twice for the same packet, which is what cuts the speed of repeaters.

If you truly want to know whether the change between your two configurations actually affects the speed, the only really effective way is to transmit a large file to something like http://www.wetransfer.com and then retrieve it, in each configuration. Use a stopwatch, and see what really happens.

Me, though, I'd just get another router to use as an AP.
#69196 by kc8
Wed Nov 17, 2010 5:41 am
Thanks for your response.The switch is a 10/100baseTx switch(not a hub). The Router is 802.11n with 10/100baseTX wired Lan ports. Right now all my wireless devices are 802.11n and I have the wireless set up for "n" only, but I will probably change that to include "g" to accomodate guests.
The 300mbps and 150mbps were the connection speeds indicated by my wireless adapter, not actual throughput speeds. I realize that is not an indicator of actual speed, but I thought it was strange that it connected at 150mbps if the Ooma feed was plugged into a LAN port on the router and 300mbps if the Ooma feed was plugged into the Wan port of the router. May have been unrelated. I'll test the connection speeds with the site you suggested.
I just ordered a second router and will place it in front of the Ooma.
Thanks again.

kc8

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