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#68841 by murphy
Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:22 pm
Are you going to keep any AT&T phone lines or will you only have a DSL feed?

If you are going to back feed the Ooma dial tone into your house wiring it is necessary to completely disconnect any feeds from a regular land line. For one thing even if the land line just has voltage and no dial tone you are forcing the Ooma box to drive up to 5 miles of copper wire. It was not designed to handle that load. You will get noise, hum, and also will provide an ingress path for lightning surges direct into the Ooma box.
#68851 by Jerry_NA
Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:39 pm
I'm sorry Dr. Mullen, but you are making an unwarranted assumption in re your advice. There are two other reasons why the telephone wires powered from your Ooma unit should be disconnected from the outside lines at the network interface box.

1. If a telephone company technician is testing or otherwise working on lines outside your house, or if customer service "flips a switch" by mistake and turns on your lines (as well as the previously mentioned nearby lightning strike), then electrical current could feed back into your Ooma or telephones/fax/etc. and burn out some electronics. Your local telephone company will probably not admit fault, nor pay a single penny to replace your equipment, even if they are directly responsible for the damage. Relatively low probability, true, but the "fix" will take you merely a few moments with a screwdriver and some bits of electrical tape.

2. If you want to feed your whole house via wall jacks, not just one telephone hooked straight into the Ooma system, then you must have the Ooma on separate wiring from the DSL line. DSL comes in as a higher (I think) frequency electrical signal, so if they're on the same circuit, then your Ooma unit would be receiving voltage where it's only supposed to be sending it out. At the very least, you may hear noisy interference when you could be getting a much clearer signal. DSL splitters only separate voice signals from DSL signals, they do not act as one way gates.

This makes the reasonable assumption that all of your circuits were wired perfectly, that no one accidentally switched from one color wire to another somewhere randomly halfway through the house, and therefore all of the wires are isolated from each other. Correcting that would be an... adventure. Let's hope you don't have that.

There are quite a few forum topics related to distributing Ooma throughout a house when DSL is being used, so I will not repeat that here. (Southsound shows up in quite a few of them, being quite experienced in these matters.)
#68852 by kieranmullen
Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:52 pm
Allightee I concede it tis better to err on the side of caution. However with point #1 this could damage your equipment even if you had nothing to do with omma and were minding your own business and properly using your equipment, the phone company would not take any responsibility for it.

Voice is usualyl carried 300-4000 hertz anything about is fair game with the lower tones used for signal. Provided of course there is no multiplexing being used or load coils due to distance.

Jerry_NA wrote:I'm sorry Dr. Mullen, but you are making an unwarranted assumption in re your advice. There are two other reasons why the telephone wires powered from your Ooma unit should be disconnected from the outside lines at the network interface box.

1. If a telephone company technician is testing or otherwise working on lines outside your house, or if customer service "flips a switch" by mistake and turns on your lines (as well as the previously mentioned nearby lightning strike), then electrical current could feed back into your Ooma or telephones/fax/etc. and burn out some electronics. Your local telephone company will probably not admit fault, nor pay a single penny to replace your equipment, even if they are directly responsible for the damage. Relatively low probability, true, but the "fix" will take you merely a few moments with a screwdriver and some bits of electrical tape.

2. If you want to feed your whole house via wall jacks, not just one telephone hooked straight into the Ooma system, then you must have the Ooma on separate wiring from the DSL line. DSL comes in as a higher (I think) frequency electrical signal, so if they're on the same circuit, then your Ooma unit would be receiving voltage where it's only supposed to be sending it out. At the very least, you may hear noisy interference when you could be getting a much clearer signal. DSL splitters only separate voice signals from DSL signals, they do not act as one way gates.

This makes the reasonable assumption that all of your circuits were wired perfectly, that no one accidentally switched from one color wire to another somewhere randomly halfway through the house, and therefore all of the wires are isolated from each other. Correcting that would be an... adventure. Let's hope you don't have that.

There are quite a few forum topics related to distributing Ooma throughout a house when DSL is being used, so I will not repeat that here. (Southsound shows up in quite a few of them, being quite experienced in these matters.)
#68853 by southsound
Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:52 pm
Jerry_NA wrote:I'm sorry Dr. Mullen...

I think I may have misidentified our esteemed poster. I now believe that it is either his child or one of his students - or maybe just a wannabe of some sort. Obviously not the intellect showing here that would be brought by an esteemed condensed matter theorist. And his comments about integrity make me wonder if there isn't a slippery slope here.

A person who will continue to use a service that is unpaid because the company somehow doesn't shut it off or would continue to accept a newspaper delivery whithout making a call to the paper is the same kind of person who will pocket an extra $20 bill in change they receive because a cashier made a mistake. Or maybe leave work early because the boss is out of town and nobody is watching. Or maybe will take a $100 from a friend's wallet when visiting because the friend left it out for the world to see. Bleah! My notably off-topic comments end here.
#68854 by kieranmullen
Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:57 pm
No, No & No.

southsound wrote: is the same kind of person who will pocket an extra $20 bill in change they receive because a cashier made a mistake. Or maybe leave work early because the boss is out of town and nobody is watching. Or maybe will take a $100 from a friend's wallet when visiting because the friend left it out for the world to see. Bleah! My notably off-topic comments end here.
#68879 by kieranmullen
Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:32 pm
Jerry When the line is disconnected there is dialtone on the line. It presents no more hazard than an active line. Perhaps it is different where you are.

Jerry_NA wrote:I'm sorry Dr. Mullen, but you are making an unwarranted assumption in re your advice. There are two other reasons why the telephone wires powered from your Ooma unit should be disconnected from the outside lines at the network interface box.

1. If a telephone company technician is testing or otherwise working on lines outside your house, or if customer service "flips a switch" by mistake and turns on your lines (as well as the previously mentioned nearby lightning strike), then electrical current could feed back into your Ooma or telephones/fax/etc. and burn out some electronics. Your local telephone company will probably not admit fault, nor pay a single penny to replace your equipment, even if they are directly responsible for the damage. Relatively low probability, true, but the "fix" will take you merely a few moments with a screwdriver and some bits of electrical tape.

2. If you want to feed your whole house via wall jacks, not just one telephone hooked straight into the Ooma system, then you must have the Ooma on separate wiring from the DSL line. DSL comes in as a higher (I think) frequency electrical signal, so if they're on the same circuit, then your Ooma unit would be receiving voltage where it's only supposed to be sending it out. At the very least, you may hear noisy interference when you could be getting a much clearer signal. DSL splitters only separate voice signals from DSL signals, they do not act as one way gates.

This makes the reasonable assumption that all of your circuits were wired perfectly, that no one accidentally switched from one color wire to another somewhere randomly halfway through the house, and therefore all of the wires are isolated from each other. Correcting that would be an... adventure. Let's hope you don't have that.

There are quite a few forum topics related to distributing Ooma throughout a house when DSL is being used, so I will not repeat that here. (Southsound shows up in quite a few of them, being quite experienced in these matters.)
#68881 by southsound
Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:58 pm
No wonder the logic is lame and the writing style is so lacking. It's not the prof but it may be his kid...

Image
He's on Bebo.
#68882 by kieranmullen
Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:01 pm
A wee too much time on your hands eh laddie?

southsound wrote:No wonder the logic is lame and the writing style is so lacking. It's not the prof but it may be his kid...

Image
#68883 by southsound
Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:02 pm
:P

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