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#3685 by murphy
Sat Feb 28, 2009 4:57 am
ooma only uses line 1.

To use the tester on line 2 you would need an adapter from Radio Shack that splits the two lines into two one line jacks. It looks exactly like the standard splitter that splits line 1 into two line 1 jacks. The only difference is that the two jacks are labeled line 1 and line 2. There is also a triple jack that provides line 1, line 2, and line 1 + line 2.

An easy way too avoid problems, if your house is wired properly and you don't have an integrated local land line, is to use line 2 to provide the connection between the hub and the scout(s).
#3686 by WayneDsr
Sat Feb 28, 2009 7:38 am
Installing the Hub/Scout on line 2 is also a good way to prevent DSL from interfering with the hub/scout, which was my issue.

Wayne
#3766 by johnz8
Sun Mar 01, 2009 10:15 am
I have another point where I have access to both my broad band and a phone jack. It is in the part of the house where I can't get a Scout to work. So last night I disconnected the Ooma hub and installed it in that part of the house. Interesting findings. The Scout now works on the jacks where it would not previously and no longer works where it once did. Hmmmm. The traditional land line phones work everywhere.

I got a polarity tester and checked every jack in the house and they all check ok. I went and got a 2 line splitter at Home Depot and tested the second line at every jack in the house. It shows to be dead or inactive so i guess I have a private wire system if I need to resort to that. The only thing I could not check with the tester is the connectivity of the send line from jack to jack. I guess I could check for open with a meter and then short the 2 wires at the dmark and go back and check each jack second line for a short or just go for it and hope for the best.

So at this point I would have to guess that the 2 parts of the house are 2 daisy chained phone wire systems connected at a common point. But something is keeping them from being fully connected. A filter? I just don't know and I think it is done in my phone box where I don't have access. Qwest is coming to shut down the old VDSL I have on the 9th and installing the new DSL and a new modem. Maybe he can solve this for me, he will have way better equipment than I have and some insight into what they have done. I am stuck at this point unless you have some ideas I have yet to consider. I do have a few new testing tools in my tool box I was not planning on. Ha ha.
WayneDsr wrote:Installing the Hub/Scout on line 2 is also a good way to prevent DSL from interfering with the hub/scout, which was my issue.

Wayne
#3769 by johnz8
Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:13 am
All of this is more involved than I thought i would be but I do like geek expeditions. I do worry about the every day consumer regarding Ooma. Who are they and what expectations do they have. It needs o be plug and play for most people and not very technical. Ooma needs to appeal to a broad market to really take off. Maybe my situation is a bit unusual. I don't really know but i see others with the same problems on the forum. Some of the issues will resolve themselves as ooma refines their documentation and educates their help desk and knowledge base. I have a stake, as do you, in their long term success since we both love the Ooma solution.

WayneDsr wrote:
Who ever dies with the most toys wins


Testing tools count too :-)!

Wayne
#3771 by WayneDsr
Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:35 am
Well, I guess ooma is still on the edge of technology, like computers, there is yet a real plug and play device.
As for me ooma was actually pretty much plug and play. It worked out of the box and I'm still amazed, since I have ancient wiring both tele and electric. I've spent a lot of time trying to make it better, just as we would with a new antenna!

I have no static, echo, delay or dropouts, every call is perfect, long distance or local. (of course, knock on wood)


Wayne
#3777 by johnz8
Sun Mar 01, 2009 1:21 pm
My system has good sound quality and I took care of a slight echo. Now it is a matter of implementation and my house wiring issues. I will work it out.

WayneDsr wrote:Well, I guess ooma is still on the edge of technology, like computers, there is yet a real plug and play device.
As for me ooma was actually pretty much plug and play. It worked out of the box and I'm still amazed, since I have ancient wiring both tele and electric. I've spent a lot of time trying to make it better, just as we would with a new antenna!

I have no static, echo, delay or dropouts, every call is perfect, long distance or local. (of course, knock on wood)


Wayne
#6135 by mrjagster
Wed Apr 08, 2009 7:30 pm
This is a very timely discussion. I was having a dropped call issue and it seems my dropped calls were being caused by a dropped connection. I have AT&T DSL. After weeks of trying to figure it out I discovered that my connection always dropped when I had an incoming call.

I called AT&T and they sent a technician out (after they tested the line and realized the issue was on their side). The tech's solution was to split the incoming signal into voice and data and have dual phone jack wall plates - one for data and one for voice.

Not a problem I thought. I already had a 2 jack outlet in my office where the OOMA hub is located. No more dropped calls... fantastic.

I then went down to the kitchen where my OOMA scout is located and found 4 red lights. No problem I'll split the line and install a 2 line jack. I did and I got 4 red lights. Interestingly enough I checked the nearest phone jack - 1 room away - and where I had already installed a 2 jack outlet and wonder of wonders I got a blue light.

Oh yes I did make sure I was plugging into the voice line (not data) and through all of this the hub did not experience any issues.

My wife has instructed me to get the scout working in the kitchen. Any ideas?

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