Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#49307 by cmp
Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:37 pm
Installing the OOMA device has drastically decreased my internet performance. Here are the numbers from speakeasy test:

Modem>computer - 6.37mbps / 1.56mbps
Modem>ooma>laptop - .42mbps / 1.54mbps

Tried updating QOS from 384 to 1540. Test result .35mbps / 1.63mbps

Disabled QOS - rebooted ooma. Test result .44mbps / 1.41mbps


Are there additional configuration settings I am missing? I work from home and will not be able to keep device if internet speed is so slow.

Thanks,
Chris
#49319 by hingli
Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:53 pm
I have the same issue. My internet is very slow.

Modem > Router > Computer - 8.05 Mb / 1Mb
Modem > ooma > Router > Computer - 2 ~ 3 Mb / 0.5 Mb
#49610 by pbernard
Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:32 pm
Here is what I found. Back-feeding your house wiring sometimes causes an internet slow down. I worked with ooma techs for a long time on this problem. I ended up bagging the back-feed situation and bought new wireless phones for my house. This has solved my internet slow down. Can't explain why.
#49629 by coldsteel
Fri Mar 05, 2010 3:46 pm
I don't want to get the OOMA powers that be mad at me but I think their advice to put the OOMA behind your CABLE/DSL modem and in front of everything else should ONLY be done if you don't have an existing firewall/router in place otherwise that's creating a network problem just waiting to happen (several stability, performance and security issues with this configuration). Move the OOMA to be just another network client on your network and not to act as a router or firewall. You probably DONT need the QOS.

I have another topic post http://www.ooma.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=6962&start=0&bookmark=1&hash=de18615f on switching DNS providers which I found also helped performance and more importantly OOMA stability but you may not need to do that.
#49889 by Compfan03
Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:10 am
Are you suggesting that I can have my wired/wireless router set up the way it was before I got Ooma, and that I can plug Ooma into one of the four ports, just the same way I have my NAS (network attached storage external disk) attached?

Could I take it a step further? I have a wired network connection that goes from one room to the second room that houses my wired/wireless router. Could I plug the Ooma hub into the remote hardwired port?

Lastly, can I follow your DNS advice if I do not have a separate firewall appliance. I only have my router.

I am kind of new at this so I appreciate the support you have already provided and thank you for answering my questions.
#49936 by coldsteel
Mon Mar 08, 2010 8:47 pm
Compfan03 wrote:Are you suggesting that I can have my wired/wireless router set up the way it was before I got Ooma, and that I can plug Ooma into one of the four ports, just the same way I have my NAS (network attached storage external disk) attached?

Could I take it a step further? I have a wired network connection that goes from one room to the second room that houses my wired/wireless router. Could I plug the Ooma hub into the remote hardwired port?

Lastly, can I follow your DNS advice if I do not have a separate firewall appliance. I only have my router.

I am kind of new at this so I appreciate the support you have already provided and thank you for answering my questions.


Yes,Yes, and Yes - the setup you had before you got your OOMA should have been just fine. All of the rooms in my house are WIRED CAT5 connecting to a patch panel in my basement (which connects to a router and then to a firewall for WAN access). The OOMA simply plugs into one of the wall jacks upstairs (i.e. the remote hardwired port) just like any other network device (TIVO, POPCORN HOUR, PRINTER, NAS etc).

Assuming that your router is acting as a DHCP server to the rest of your network then setting the DNS server in your router will propagate it to all of its DHCP clients - including the OOMA.

I would change just one thing at a time though the first being to move the OOMA so that its just another client (service) on your network and not acting as a router/firewall to your network. Once that's working then try the DNS changes if you thinkl you need it.
#49960 by bilbro
Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:59 am
I wonder if this is generally true or depends on the quality of the DSL service? I think my service is a little marginal, the jitter seems on the high side. I've tried both ways and I think the call quality is better with the Telo as the first device after the DSL modem. It would be much more convenient for me to have it attached as a regular network device. I haven't had time to do much experimentation so would be interested in other opinions.
#49968 by coldsteel
Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:10 am
bilbro wrote:...........I think the call quality is better with the Telo as the first device after the DSL modem. It would be much more convenient for me to have it attached as a regular network device...........


Your DSL modem itself can be configured to be just a modem, just a router or a router firewall combination and can have a huge impact on your performance I have an article about configuring Verizon DSL with a Westell 6100 DSL modem
http://winstonlawrence.com/notebook/?p=245. I have mine setup with no security since I already have a firewall whereas the default if I remember was low security to do some filtering.

Bottom line is if your OOMA becomes the internal gateway device it gets exposed to a lot of traffic beyond just the OOMA VOIP traffic. When I turn on monitoring for external attempts to access my network I see hundreds of attempts per hour targeting the Verizon address space (enough that I just block huge chunks of IP address space that originate in China - but that's another story). My point here is that I would be very leery about having all those external penetration tests hitting my OOMA directly instead of putting a firewall in the middle of the two.

I
#49975 by byersthja
Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:46 am
coldsteel wrote:Bottom line is if your OOMA becomes the internal gateway device it gets exposed to a lot of traffic beyond just the OOMA VOIP traffic. When I turn on monitoring for external attempts to access my network I see hundreds of attempts per hour targeting the Verizon address space (enough that I just block huge chunks of IP address space that originate in China - but that's another story). My point here is that I would be very leery about having all those external penetration tests hitting my OOMA directly instead of putting a firewall in the middle of the two.

I


I agree completely with "coldsteel". I don't know why Ooma suggests putting their device in front of the router. I would never do that. Put it behind your router and a lot of problems will be eliminated, including the "internet slowdowns" I see folks posting about. Make all the QOS, port forwarding, DNS, etc., changes that you might need, at the router level, and leave the Ooma alone. My Ooma Hub has performed flawlessly behind my router.
#49987 by F4ith
Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:24 pm
byersthja wrote:
coldsteel wrote:Bottom line is if your OOMA becomes the internal gateway device it gets exposed to a lot of traffic beyond just the OOMA VOIP traffic. When I turn on monitoring for external attempts to access my network I see hundreds of attempts per hour targeting the Verizon address space (enough that I just block huge chunks of IP address space that originate in China - but that's another story). My point here is that I would be very leery about having all those external penetration tests hitting my OOMA directly instead of putting a firewall in the middle of the two.

I


I agree completely with "coldsteel". I don't know why Ooma suggests putting their device in front of the router. I would never do that. Put it behind your router and a lot of problems will be eliminated, including the "internet slowdowns" I see folks posting about. Make all the QOS, port forwarding, DNS, etc., changes that you might need, at the router level, and leave the Ooma alone. My Ooma Hub has performed flawlessly behind my router.


I think the reason is because Ooma does not want to add another variable to support if they recommend to put their device after the router. For example:

At first I have the following set up:
Cable - Ooma - Old Router - PCs

I don't see any speed difference and it is working fine. Since I am concern about my security and would like to have more control, I decided to put Ooma after the Router.
Cable - New Router - Ooma - PCs

Once I do that, my internet speed slowed down. At first I thought it is my Ooma that caused this problem but even when I disconnect my Ooma from my router, my internet speed is still slow. After trouble shooting for an hour, I found out it is my new router. When I use my old router, my internet speed is normal. Long story short, I can see why Ooma suggests us to put Ooma before our router and it is simply to make it easier for them to troubleshoot if we encounter problems.

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