Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#49086 by southsound
Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:06 pm
joel1952 wrote:Southbound,

I have a similar setup, DSL Dry loop and I see the following regarding pluging the "wall" port of the Hub into the splitter....
This is where the problem comes in - DSL does not play well with HPNA so in your case you must keep the HPNA signal from the WALL port separate from the DSL signal.
The other thought is to use the "phone" and "wall" port both on Line 1. Can they coexist? I'm assuminging it can. I just don't want any voice quality degradation if I use line 1 for both "phone" and "wall" output of the Hub.
Yes, as described above. The HPNA signal and your analog voice signal play very well together. This is NOT true of HPNA and DSL.

...but when I Do so, it disables my Hub. I can no longer make calls and the Tab turns red. Expected result - see above in blue

it does not seem like the DSL signal and the output from the Hub can exist together on my old 2-wire system(??)
I have never seen telephone wiring that was only 2-wire unless installed by a homeowner. Are you sure you don't have 4 or more wires behind your jacks? If you do, you can separate the DSL from the other signals and use the combined WALL and PHONE ports on the second pair. If this is not the case, then see my additional comments below.
thanks for any help

Additional comments: If joel1952 has only two wires running between jacks, then the best solution is to run a new home run for the DSL modem and connect up the WALL and PHONE jacks on the hub to the existing phone wiring - AFTER disconnecting those wires from the telco at the Network Interface Box. Notice that I said to run a new home run cable for the DSL modem. This means running only one new wire instead of having to rewire the entire house. The new cable would be the only one connected to the telco wiring at the NIB - the other wires would be joined and insulated as in my instructions to the other poster. This would be an extremely unusual situation to have only two wires (one pair) but it does happen.
#49089 by murphy
Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:30 pm
DSL and HPNA are incompatible.
Your DSL signal should go direct to your DSL modem and no place else.
#49100 by southsound
Mon Mar 01, 2010 6:35 pm
murphy wrote:DSL and HPNA are incompatible.
Your DSL signal should go direct to your DSL modem and no place else.

I think I said that quite well above but I used blue text so it might have been easy to overlook. :P
#49103 by murphy
Mon Mar 01, 2010 6:47 pm
southsound wrote:
murphy wrote:DSL and HPNA are incompatible.
Your DSL signal should go direct to your DSL modem and no place else.

I think I said that quite well above but I used blue text so it might have been easy to overlook. :P

Yes you did. I have this problem of failing to read to the end of a thread before posting. My answer was aimed at the post at the bottom of page 1. :o I should have quoted it.
#49156 by joel1952
Tue Mar 02, 2010 7:23 am
southsound wrote:
joel1952 wrote:Southbound,

I have a similar setup, DSL Dry loop and I see the following regarding pluging the "wall" port of the Hub into the splitter....
This is where the problem comes in - DSL does not play well with HPNA so in your case you must keep the HPNA signal from the WALL port separate from the DSL signal.
The other thought is to use the "phone" and "wall" port both on Line 1. Can they coexist? I'm assuminging it can. I just don't want any voice quality degradation if I use line 1 for both "phone" and "wall" output of the Hub.
Yes, as described above. The HPNA signal and your analog voice signal play very well together. This is NOT true of HPNA and DSL.

...but when I Do so, it disables my Hub. I can no longer make calls and the Tab turns red. Expected result - see above in blue

it does not seem like the DSL signal and the output from the Hub can exist together on my old 2-wire system(??)
I have never seen telephone wiring that was only 2-wire unless installed by a homeowner. Are you sure you don't have 4 or more wires behind your jacks? If you do, you can separate the DSL from the other signals and use the combined WALL and PHONE ports on the second pair. If this is not the case, then see my additional comments below.
thanks for any help

Additional comments: If joel1952 has only two wires running between jacks, then the best solution is to run a new home run for the DSL modem and connect up the WALL and PHONE jacks on the hub to the existing phone wiring - AFTER disconnecting those wires from the telco at the Network Interface Box. Notice that I said to run a new home run cable for the DSL modem. This means running only one new wire instead of having to rewire the entire house. The new cable would be the only one connected to the telco wiring at the NIB - the other wires would be joined and insulated as in my instructions to the other poster. This would be an extremely unusual situation to have only two wires (one pair) but it does happen.

You are right. I have 4 wires. I meant that only two are utilized.

And yes, good solution. Use the other two wires to send the Wall output to the rest of the house


ADDITIONAL qUESTION 1) I guess I don't understand the meaning/implication of HPNA. BUT I DO see now that page 32 of the Hub instructions (DSL and Phone Service on the same Line) does NOT apply to my situation, rather page 33 (DSL and Phone on different lines) is what I need, i.e. I need a separate jack(or just use the other two wires) for the phone (HPNA??) signal distribution

Question 2) So apparently (just for my own edifiation)the Phone and Wall ports are DIFFERENT signals!!? Phone out is "Analog phone" and Wall=HPNA??

THANKS VERY MUCH FOR THE HELP. I appreciate it
#49195 by southsound
Tue Mar 02, 2010 3:24 pm
Your questions in green, my answers in red.
joel1952 wrote:You are right. I have 4 wires. I meant that only two are utilized.
And yes, good solution. Use the other two wires to send the Wall output to the rest of the house

That will work well. Depending on how comfortable you are with wiring the jacks, you could actually get a two jack assembly to replace the one where your DSL modem is - run one jack on the first pair for DSL and the other on the second pair for the ooma WALL and PHONE connection. A simple single line splitter can combine the two before they plug into the second jack. Then, go to each jack in the house and swing the red and green wires of the jack over to the second like wiring. Then any jack in the house can be used for either the scout or a phone with no additional adapters. Some folks who are less comfortable will use 2-line splitters instead of rewiring - but I like the clean look of the jacks when you don't need the adapters. Here is a picture of a 2-line splitter:
Image

ADDITIONAL QUESTION 1) I guess I don't understand the meaning/implication of HPNA.
HPNA is actually a networking protocol. The reason it doesn't work well with DSL is that the signals interfere with each other. ooma uses it to run the scout because the signal between the WALL jacks is digital and that is how the two units talk to each other.

BUT I DO see now that page 32 of the Hub instructions (DSL and Phone Service on the same Line) does NOT apply to my situation, rather page 33 (DSL and Phone on different lines) is what I need, i.e. I need a separate jack(or just use the other two wires) for the phone (HPNA??) signal distribution
Totally correct. I've talked a little about it above.

Question 2) So apparently (just for my own edifiation)the Phone and Wall ports are DIFFERENT signals!!? Phone out is "Analog phone" and Wall=HPNA??
Correct on the PHONE connection. It is what we call an FXS output that connects to either telephone(s) or a cordless base station. The WALL port is both an FXO port (that means it accepts a phone signal from the central office, if you chose to integrate your landline - which I believe is a bad idea) and the HPNA connection for the scout.

THANKS VERY MUCH FOR THE HELP. I appreciate it
#49495 by kaho
Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:12 pm
hi Southsound,
I have been reading your posts and I am very impressed. however, i am a little bit confused here. i do have 2 questions regarding this topic:
1. like the other poster, i have ATT Dsl dry loop and no landline. Do i have to physically disconnect the wires on the NIBox? if yes then how?
2. How do I separate the line from wall jack to my integrated router modem and my Telo PHONE port, in order to have dial tone throughout home?
Thanks,
#49536 by southsound
Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:42 pm
kaho wrote:hi Southsound,
I have been reading your posts and I am very impressed. however, i am a little bit confused here. i do have 2 questions regarding this topic:
1. like the other poster, i have ATT Dsl dry loop and no landline. Do i have to physically disconnect the wires on the NIBox? if yes then how?
2. How do I separate the line from wall jack to my integrated router modem and my Telo PHONE port, in order to have dial tone throughout home?
Thanks,

Thanks for the compliment. I'm just an old phone guy - but I love to help others. The big thing to remember about DSL is you want to get the signal from the telco to your modem in the cleanest way. In my case, I still have a landline for financial reasons. But my DSL signal does NOT run throughout the house. It goes to a special ADSL splitter and then to my modem only. If I had a dry loop like you I would not need the splitter - I could go directly to the modem. If you are able to run a wire (either existing pair or new) directly from your Network Interface Box to your modem and nowhere else, you will be one happy camper. A lot depends on how far you are from that box, your construction, and your comfort level working with low voltage wiring. If you can easily do so, run a new cable from your NIB to the modem. Connect up the new line to where your existing blue/white wiring connects in your NIB. Then take that existing wiring off of the terminals and use scotchlock or beanie connectors to connect the wires and insulate them from outside elements. Blue/white to blue/white and white/blue to white/blue. Then you can run a cable from the PHONE jack on your ooma to an existing wall jack and your entire house will be powered.

If this seems to be a little beyond your skill or comfort level, no problem. Most homes built in the last 40 years have phone jacks that are wired for more than one line. If yours is, you will find 4 wires connected behind your wall plates. Just keep your DSL modem connected as it is but buy a quantity of the 2-line adapters shown in a previous post in this thread. Use one where ever you need to plug in a phone. At the jack where the DSL modem is located, line 1 goes to the modem. Line 2 goes to the ooma PHONE jack. If you want a phone there as well, get a single line splitter as feed both the wall and the phone with that splitter, again from the PHONE jack on the ooma. Phones throughout the house will be plugged into the LIne 2 jack. After setting up the splitters, go to the Network Interface Box and check to make sure there is not a second plug connected to a second jack. If there is, disconnect it and you will be free from any signal that might damage your equipment or cause interference. Remember not to disconnect the first one because it is what feeds your modem.

It's a little late and I've had a busy day so if some of this doesn't seem clear, feel free to reply or send me a PM with the little envelope below my name. :cool:
#49659 by truston
Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:04 pm
Thanks to all in this thread so far; the info has been very useful. I believe I've disconnected my house wiring from the telco properly (unplugged the modular jacks in the NIB). However, when I connect the Phone port from my ooma Hub to the wall jack, it immediately goes off-hook on ooma Line 1. There's only one house phone plugged in currently, and if I pick it up soon enough I hear ooma dial tone. After a short while (20 seconds or so), the Line 1 light goes out and if I pick up the house phone, I hear fast busy.

I'm assuming this means there's a short somewhere in my house wiring. Is that a correct diagnosis? There is some funky wiring going on in the house: previous owner had an alarm system and an ISDN line, neither of which are in service any longer. I believe both were on separate pairs, but I'll need to do some more tracing. I believe I can sort it out, but it will help me to confirm what I'm looking for (short, or open pair, or what). The house phone landline was working fine prior to disconnection (I ported it to ooma this week and the landline is canceled). Thanks for any tips!

[Edit: Forgot to mention, I'm using cable modem for internet, so there's no DSL involved here.]
Last edited by truston on Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#49661 by murphy
Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:12 pm
Make sure that the ISDN adapter has also been removed.

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