Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#44032 by Breeze123
Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:23 am
    I am a new ooma customer and am in the process of having my existing number moved from my cable company to ooma. I currently have 2 telco lines-- one to my ooma device(where I have my wireless phone connectect) and the other to my kitchen phone. I can easily see where the 2 telephone lines are connected in my basement. (The other ends are in the house connected to telephones.) Once my telephone number port is complete, I was going to cut both of the lines, splice the wires and put RJ11 jacks on the end of each. Then I was going to install my ooma Telo in the basement and connect these 2 jacks to a single "splitter" jack which I would plug into my ooma device. Nearby is the router and modem that I use to connect all my computers to. I would follow the ooma installation instructions and plug the RJ45 jack from my modem direct to my ooma Telo and then connect the ooma Telo to my router/hub. What I am looking for is any instructions for wiring the other ends of my 2 existing telephone cables (they are connected via a blue and blue/white wire) to the "street". I'm assuming that I just need to put jacks on them and plug them into my ooma device. Let me know if this sounds correct and if you have instructions on how I would wire the jack. (I have the proper tools). Thanks, Ron
#44042 by hpepper
Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:47 am
Right - the white/blue and blue/white connect to the jack - center two pins. On older wiring they would be red and green.

Assuming you don't have landline service, it is best to disconnect the house wiring at the demarcation box on the outside of your house to make sure stray voltage doesn't damage your Ooma equipment.
#44145 by sfhub
Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:06 pm
Definitely disconnect the 2 telco lines where they come in at the basement. If it is more convenient to install Ooma at the basement then do that, but keep in mind you could also install Ooma somewhere else in the house and just plug into the wall, it will still feed all the rooms. If you care about polarity it can easily be reversed but 99% of apps don't care.
#44382 by Breeze123
Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:45 am
I don't understand a few things:
- Please note that the wiring in my home is very simple. There are 2 wires (not connected to each other). One end (of each) is connected in the basement to a small white "panel" (looks like there is a blue wire and a blue/white wire connected to the white panel for each of these lines). The other ends of these lines are connected to the 2 jacks inside the house (to which I have 2 telephones connected-- one is a wireless one with "slave" phones throughout the house). I don't understand any issue with "electricity" from the street, because I would cut both lines (remove them from the white panel).
- I am a little confused as to how to wire the RJ11 jacks..... With the clip facing downward...and the wire being inserted "forward"...should I use the middle 2 slots as follows:? blue on left, blue/white on right in the middle slots????

- I am planning on putting my ooma Telo in the basement and putting these 2 ends into it (and connecting it to the modem/router in the basement)...BUT.... I don't understand how I would be able to put the device upstairs because the 2 telephone lines are NOT connected to each other in any way. (I am planning to use my existing wireless phone/answering machine upstairs anyway.)
------
OTHER:
- Since I am still dependent on my existing telephone connection (while my telephone number is being ported over), what can I do now? Should I disconnect one of the telephone wires and connect the ooma Telo to that and keep the other one connected without the ooma? In this way, I would be able to get calls from my existing telco line upstairs (no ooma) and then when the number transfer is complete, my other phone would start to ring. (At that point, I would cut the telco line from the white panel, put an RJ11 jack on it and connect it via a "splitter" to the ooma that is already installed.) Am I thinking about this correctly? Thanks, again, Ron C.
#44421 by sfhub
Fri Jan 29, 2010 11:51 am
Breeze123 wrote:I don't understand a few things:
- Please note that the wiring in my home is very simple. There are 2 wires (not connected to each other). One end (of each) is connected in the basement to a small white "panel" (looks like there is a blue wire and a blue/white wire connected to the white panel for each of these lines). The other ends of these lines are connected to the 2 jacks inside the house (to which I have 2 telephones connected-- one is a wireless one with "slave" phones throughout the house). I don't understand any issue with "electricity" from the street, because I would cut both lines (remove them from the white panel).

There is no electricity issue if you disconnect the telco's line from your home wiring. That is equivalent to your plans to physically cut the home lines so they no longer make contact with the phone company lines. If it is possible to open up the white box, you might find that there are modular rj11 plugs you can just remove, screws where you can just remove the telco's wires by unwinding from around the screw or if it is a punch-down block, just pulling the connecting wires from their posts will do. It's possible that the white box is just self contained and the only way to separate the home wiring is to cut them physically, but that doesn't really make too much sense from a device design standpoint because it would have made installing the white box in the first place more difficult (much better to keep the white box and home wiring separate and have the installer connect the two at install time).
Breeze123 wrote:- I am a little confused as to how to wire the RJ11 jacks..... With the clip facing downward...and the wire being inserted "forward"...should I use the middle 2 slots as follows:? blue on left, blue/white on right in the middle slots????

See this page, pay attention to USOC Pair 1 and possibly Pair 2 if you plan to use those.
http://www.lanshack.com/wire_phone_jack.aspx

The diagram is from the standpoint of the outlet. Adjust appropriately if you are wiring a plug/jack.

Keep in mind as long as you consistently use the same color pair and the center two pins/slots everything will work. You might get polarity differences if you don't pay attention to the ordering of the pairs, but everything will still work for 99.9% of your equipment. If you want to maintain polarity, basically in most situations the wiring within your house should reverse the pairs when going from male-to-male or female-to-female. If you look at your phone cable connecting your phone to the wall, you'll notice the two male plugs are wired opposite each other.

If it were me, for your situation, I would skip the splicing of the home wiring and instead for each wire you remove from the white box, put RJ11 plugs/jacks on according to the USOC wiring guide.

Then I would get an inexpensive female - to - 2 female coupler like this
http://www.uxcell.com/rj11-female-femal ... 31444.html

Connect the two home wiring RJ11 plugs to the two-port side of the coupler and connect ooma to the other port (via the phone cable that comes with Ooma). This way, you don't need to keep your Ooma box right at the location of the white box, but can place it anywhere in the basement and just run standard phone wiring to connect to the modular coupler.

Using couplers (or punch-down blocks) are easier to maintain and more convenient than splicing wiring for obvious reasons. I use a 66 punch-down block for my wiring
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punch_block
so I have easy access to every pair of each wall outlet and from there it is pretty much just connect the dots as to which room gets which line but that is probably more complex than you need for your two outlets and single incoming line.

Breeze123 wrote:- I am planning on putting my ooma Telo in the basement and putting these 2 ends into it (and connecting it to the modem/router in the basement)...BUT.... I don't understand how I would be able to put the device upstairs because the 2 telephone lines are NOT connected to each other in any way. (I am planning to use my existing wireless phone/answering machine upstairs anyway.)

If you opened up the white box (which I'm assuming is some form of demarcation point) and disconnected the telco lines but left the two lines for your inside wiring, then the two outlets would probably still be connected. As long as the wiring is connected to the outlets, you can place the Ooma anywhere in the house there is an outlet, and it would supply ring tone to every outlet that is also connected to that line.
Breeze123 wrote:------
OTHER:
- Since I am still dependent on my existing telephone connection (while my telephone number is being ported over), what can I do now? Should I disconnect one of the telephone wires and connect the ooma Telo to that and keep the other one connected without the ooma? In this way, I would be able to get calls from my existing telco line upstairs (no ooma) and then when the number transfer is complete, my other phone would start to ring. (At that point, I would cut the telco line from the white panel, put an RJ11 jack on it and connect it via a "splitter" to the ooma that is already installed.) Am I thinking about this correctly? Thanks, again, Ron C.

If it were me, that's what I'd do. Leave the cordless phone on the old line and the kitchen on the Ooma (use the kitchen phone for your outgoing calls). Once your incoming calls start ringing the kitchen phone, just connect the cordless phone wiring to the coupler.

I think you can also connect your existing wiring into the Ooma but I never tried it as under certain (or all?) configs Ooma uses your existing line for local calls and I didn't feel like figuring out if it could be configured the way someone would want. Maybe for your case you can read about it or someone can comment.
#44685 by Breeze123
Sun Jan 31, 2010 5:26 am
Looks like that "white panel" is a "punch down block"....(after seeing the link that you sent me). Now I'm thinking that I just need to disconnect from the telephone company (cable company), bridge the blue/white and white/blue wires together on the punch down block and take a new RJ11 cable, cut one end and tap that ends blue/white and white blue cables into the punch down block as well. In this way, I could take the other end of the cable and just plug it into the ooma Telco.... Now I should have access to all phones in the house via the ooma device.

ONE MORE QUESTION: Given this setup, I'm assuming that I just need to connect my fax machine and telephones to the wall jacks. Am I correct with all of this? (THANKS SO MUCH) Ron
#44710 by sfhub
Sun Jan 31, 2010 10:30 am
The way punch-down blocks work is column 1 is internally connected to column 2 and column 3 is internally connected to column 4.

What most people do is have a system where all the incoming lines are semi-permanently punched down on the left side (column 1) and all the outlets are semi-permanently punched down on the right side (column 4)

Then when you need to connect particular lines to particular outlets, you can just take a wire, punch it down on column 2 of the incoming line, run the wire to the column 3(s) of the outlets which are supposed to get that line and punch down (just like connecting the dots)

The punch down tools has two sides. One is a bladed punch down, which basically pushes the wire (using a spring loaded mechanism) onto the posts and simultaneously cuts one side of the wire. The other is a pure punch down which justs pushes the wire onto the posts.

Let's say you had one line and 3 outlets. Punch down and cut on column 2 of the incoming line. Run the rest of the wire around the top of the 66 block and snake it in and out of the white side rail to the column 3(s) of the outlets. Use the pure punch down side to get the wire on the post. When you reach the final outlet, use the punch down + blade side to cut the surplus wire.

Assuming line 1 (and line 2) will be the same on every outlet, some people will instead prewire lines 1&2 of every outlet by snaking a wire on the right side connecting line 1, outlet 1 to line 1, outlet 2, and so on. Then repeat for line 2. Then when they have an incoming line, all they need to do is use a bridging clip to connect the post from column 2 to the post from column 3 and instantly all the line 1s are active (and line 2 if you connect that one too)

The punch down tool and blades look like this:
http://www.amazon.com/300-650-Steren-Pu ... B000ES8EIS

Assuming whomever wired your 66 block previously followed such a system, I'd just leave all the column 1 & 4 in place. Remove the bridging clips (or physical wires) connecting column 2 & 3. That will disconnect the telco line. Punch down the Ooma line on the left side column 1. Either use a bridging clip or punch down wires to connect column 2 of the Ooma line to column 3 of the outlet lines (for the pair that you are using, which would be white-blue/blue)

Yes, you can just connect the fax machine and phones to the wall jacks. If for instance you wanted to keep a land line for the fax, with a 66 block, it is also very easy to have one outlet connected to a lane line and all the other outlets connected to Ooma.

It is also easy to wire it up so that the fax machines is upstairs (more privacy for documents), and the answering machine is downstairs (more convenient to playback messages) but still have the fax machine connected to the answering machine (to cut it off if there is an incoming fax) You can just use line 2, 3, or 4 from the fax outlet to connect back to the answering machine outlet.

Hope that helps.
#44713 by sfhub
Sun Jan 31, 2010 10:40 am
One other thing, whenever you punch down wire on the 66 block make sure it is solid core wire. That means inside the insulation it is a solid copper wire, not the ones made from tiny strands of copper wire.

The reason is when you punch down on the block, the metal posts will slice through the insulation. If you have stranded wired, the posts will slice through many if not all the wires and even if they don't cut completely through if someone pulls on the wires, that can complete the job and slice completely through. The rule of thumb is whenever you are punching down wire, whether at the outlet of the 66 block use solid core wire, which is also why most internal house wiring is solid core. Once you get to the outlet/room, then people like to use stranded because it is more flexible and easier to work with.

Also I usually just buy a big role of CAT5 wiring and use it for both phone and networking. Copper wire for networking works equally well as copper wire for phones.
#45026 by Breeze123
Wed Feb 03, 2010 3:30 am
Well... I've created a "patch cable" from the patch block to an RJ11 plug to my ooma. When I plugged it into the "telephone" jack and tried my phone upstairs everything works EXCEPT...when I tried to disconnect the line from the telephone company (that was attached to one end of the patch block), I noticed that I was not able to get incoming calls....so I plugged the plugged the "patch cable" from the patch block into the "wall" jack on the ooma and plugged the telephone into the "telephone" jack... This corrected everything. Looks like my telephone # transfer has not taken place yet. How do you know when this is complete? Thanks, Ron

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