Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#40177 by normo48
Mon Jan 04, 2010 7:54 pm
I have cable broadband internet with a static IP address. I use the static IP for remote desktop connections, and remote support hosting to computers on my LAN. When I connect modem-ooma-router ( Netgear WNDR3300 ) I get all devices working but my remote desktop constantly drops. So I'm trying to configure a modem-router-ooma setup with QoS on the router to ooma. I cannot get ooma to work this way. I've tried factory default on ooma. Then I've tried giving ooma an IP matching other stations on my LAN. So how can I get ooma to work attached to my router instead of my cable modem?
#40178 by bw1
Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:03 pm
It should work just by plugging the "To Internet" port into the router (assuming you have the Telo, otherwise the port is named differently on the Hub). Is your router configured as a DHCP server? Does it have enough IP addresses available in the range to serve all of your devices? Did you reboot the router after you plugged the Ooma in?
#40493 by normo48
Wed Jan 06, 2010 12:51 pm
What ended up happening is that my ooma telo would start up, go through the normal looking start up cycles and then it would seemingly turn itself off. All lights would go out. Then I tried to ping telo and it responded. So it was working. Next I pressed the button for brightness on my telo and all the lights came back on. Then I had a dial tone. I have no idea why it's turning itself off on startup but it does seem to work. Now my problem is that the person on the other end sounds garbled on a regular basis. I'm guess that is bandwidth. I will create a new post on that. Thanks for your help.
#40499 by daet
Wed Jan 06, 2010 1:47 pm
normo48 wrote:What ended up happening is that my ooma telo would start up, go through the normal looking start up cycles and then it would seemingly turn itself off. All lights would go out. Then I tried to ping telo and it responded. So it was working. Next I pressed the button for brightness on my telo and all the lights came back on. Then I had a dial tone. I have no idea why it's turning itself off on startup but it does seem to work. Now my problem is that the person on the other end sounds garbled on a regular basis. I'm guess that is bandwidth. I will create a new post on that. Thanks for your help.

Probably not bandwidth - either packet loss or jitter. Another possibility is that QoS on the router is very bad. You can test for some of these.

To determine your bandwidth - try Speedtest
To test for packet loss and connection jitter - try Pingtest

The advantage of Speedtest and Pingtest is that you can test bandwidth and quality between your location and specified locations that are quite distant from where you are - for example locations in CA, where I presume Ooma's servers are.

A test that gives you benchmarks to assess the VoIP "quality" of your connection is the VoIP Speedtest at whichvoip.com.

Finally, in my opinion, Netgear routers are severely firmware limited. They do support alternative firmware, such as DD-WRT, that can make a huge difference in VoIP quality by offering much better QoS options. For example, on my router, I reserve a suitable amount of downstream/upstream bandwidth for the Telo, and in addition, network traffic to/from the Telo has highest priority. This is very different than giving the generic VoIP/multimedia priority that Netgear's firmware provides because the Telo does VoIP over a tunnel, and not using a protocol like SIP.
#40502 by daet
Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:32 pm
normo38

My setup is similar to yours: cablemodem --> router --> Telo. For this system, I even have a similar router - the WNR834B v2, as opposed to your WNDR3300. Both tests shown below were conducted with a router configured with DD-WRT, instead of Netgear's firmware. The difference between the two is that first test was performed when traffic to/from my laptop had the default priority (i.e. no QoS applied), while in the second this traffic was given the highest priority. These two tests really illustrate the big difference that QoS can make:

Test -1 (no QoS):
Code: Select allVoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 40.4 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 29.5 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.2 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.1 %
Estimated MOS score: 3.6

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 6114848 bps
Upload speed: 3649528 bps
Download quality of service: 78 %
Upload quality of service: 90 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 80 ms
Average download pause: 4 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 61 ms
Average round trip time to server: 77 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 12000000bps
Route concurrency: 1.9624363
Download TCP forced idle: 44 %
Maximum route speed: 8594752bps

Notice the very high jitter, and the poor download quality of service - both of which would affect VoIP clarity.

Test - 2 (traffic prioritized by router QoS):
Code: Select allVoIP test statistics
--------------------
Jitter: you --> server: 1.1 ms
Jitter: server --> you: 1.0 ms
Packet loss: you --> server: 0.0 %
Packet loss: server --> you: 0.2 %
Packet discards: 0.0 %
Packets out of order: 0.0 %
Estimated MOS score: 4.1

Speed test statistics
---------------------
Download speed: 6051728 bps
Upload speed: 3545736 bps
Download quality of service: 96 %
Upload quality of service: 93 %
Download test type: socket
Upload test type: socket
Maximum TCP delay: 22 ms
Average download pause: 4 ms
Minimum round trip time to server: 61 ms
Average round trip time to server: 80 ms
Estimated download bandwidth: 11200000bps
Route concurrency: 1.8507111
Download TCP forced idle: 42 %
Maximum route speed: 8594752bps

Notice the sharp decrease in jitter, and corresponding improvement in download/upload quality of service. Things that are beyond control by my router - such as packet loss between the whichvoip.com server and my cable modem are unchanged, and there is essentially no change in the estimated download bandwidth, and other parameters that are largely not affected by packet prioritization, but dependent on the path between the whichvoip.com server and my cable modem - such as minimum RTT and average RTT.

So, if you suspect that your router has poor QoS algorithms, you can probably fix it using alternative firmware.

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