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#38587 by greginutah
Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:27 pm
I wonder if any experts can advise me on how best to configure QoS for my particular environment (which has connection speeds faster than most homes).

I just installed my Ooma Telo and currently have it behind my wireless router (ie: cable modem --> wireless router --> ooma telo).

I get internet download speeds that average about 12 to 16 MB, and upload speeds that average about 2 to 3 MB consistently. The results are averaged from various online speed tests going to various locations.

First of all, is there any reason I should move move my Ooma Telo between the cable modem and router to utilize Ooma's QoS if I have this fast of connection speeds? Maybe QoS Isn't as important with this much bandwidth.

If I do move it between the modem and wireless router, then I assume I should set QoS for the upload stream to be 15% - 20% of the measured bandwidth as advised in Ooma's online info.

However, if I leave it where it is (which I prefer to do unless I run into problems), then I wonder if I should configure QoS for the upload stream to "0" so it is disabled? Or should I leave it at the default 384 kbps, or increase it 15% - 20% of the measured bandwidth. Any recommendations?

One other question... I plan to get rid of my home land line and run the Ooma Telo phone jack to my home alarm panel, which will then feed all the phone jacks in my home. (I have my fingers crossed that my Ademco Vista 20SE alarm system will work with the Ooma Telo. My alarm installer said he has had good luck with Comcast VoIP service, but not so much with Vonage, etc. I guess I'll know once we try it.) Will moving the Ooma Telo before the wireless router and and utilizing QoS increase or decrease the chances of the Alarm system working, or make no difference at all?

Thanks in advance for your help!
#38591 by daet
Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:52 pm
greginutah wrote:I get internet download speeds that average about 12 to 16 MB, and upload speeds that average about 2 to 3 MB consistently. The results are averaged from various online speed tests going to various locations.

If you have cable internet, you likely have very high jitter, and substantial variation in download rates - in other words, poor QoS. I have cable internet with download/upload speeds of 20/4 mbits/sec, with about 25% variation in download rates and 15% in upload rates. The jitter can be as high as 5 msec - giving an overall estimated MOS score of 4.0 - 4.4.

To compensate for this, I have my Telo and Hub after my router. Additionally, I have QoS configured on my router, so that I reserve 500 kbps down/up each for the Telo and the Hub, with the highest priority for that traffic. This severe restriction for just those two IP addresses gives me excellent QoS, and very low jitter as measured by VoIP speed-tests offered by sites such as whichvoip.com (during these tests, I have to set the download/upload to 2 mbps).

BTW, I use dd-wrt on my router, and if you'd like my QoS rules, I can email them to you.

Joyce
#38593 by greginutah
Thu Dec 24, 2009 1:26 pm
daet (Joyce),

Yes, I do have cable internet (via Comcast). I have not run any VoIP speed tests yet. Which do you recommend I try (just whichvoip.com or others too)?

I am currently using a Linksys WRT54G router, and as you proabably know, their QoS configuration is very limited (basically just enabled/disabled and high or low priority.

I've thought about installing dd-wrt on the Linksys router once before but got distracted and never got it done. Maybe it's time to do it now.

Once you configured QoS on your router, did you change the QoS settings on your Telo or leave it at 384 kbps? I would appreciate any advice on configuring QoS in dd-wrt. So please forward any info you think will help. Thanks so much!

--Greg
#38595 by daet
Thu Dec 24, 2009 1:42 pm
greginutah wrote:Yes, I do have cable internet (via Comcast). I have not run any VoIP speed tests yet. Which do you recommend I try (just whichvoip.com or others too)?

That's the one that I've used.

greginutah wrote:I am currently using a Linksys WRT54G router, and as you proabably know, their QoS configuration is very limited (basically just enabled/disabled and high or low priority.

I've thought about installing dd-wrt on the Linksys router once before but got distracted and never got it done. Maybe it's time to do it now.

Once you configured QoS on your router, did you change the QoS settings on your Telo or leave it at 384 kbps? I would appreciate any advice on configuring QoS in dd-wrt.

I understand it is easier to configure QoS using Tomato firmware. If you go down the dd-wrt route, I can email you my iptables configuration, if you PM me. Before you install dd-wrt, make sure that your WRT54G is supported - I know that some revisions are, but others are not.

Joyce
#38601 by greginutah
Thu Dec 24, 2009 2:27 pm
Wow... I never heard of Tomato before. I did some quick searches and it looks like Tomato might be a better firmware option for the WRT54G. Now I have to spend some time doing more research and figure out if I I want to try dd-wrt or Tomato before I jump on the alternative firmware bandwagon. All that before I can even start to attempt to configure QoS on the router. And it's all new territory for me so it will probably take a while.

BTW: I ran the VoIP speed test and I get about 3.8 ms of jitter, no packet loss, a MOS score of 4.0. Strangely it indicates only 4 MB of download and 3 MB of upload (that's far less download than any other speed test produces). The quality of services measures between 86% to 96% each time I run the test. That puts me in the "standard quality" range for VoIP.

Should I expect a big improvement using Tomato or dd-wrt and configuring QoS? If so, will that improvement be just for voice quality or will it improve the odds of using Ooma with a home alarm and/or fax machine too?

Thanks again for all your help and advice.


*EDIT: Well, I guess Tomato is out for now. My WRT54G is version 8.0 and Tomato does not work on version 5 or newer. Darn it!
#38608 by daet
Thu Dec 24, 2009 3:26 pm
greginutah wrote:BTW: I ran the VoIP speed test and I get about 3.8 ms of jitter, no packet loss, a MOS score of 4.0. Strangely it indicates only 4 MB of download and 3 MB of upload (that's far less download than any other speed test produces). The quality of services measures between 86% to 96% each time I run the test. That puts me in the "standard quality" range for VoIP.

Run it a few times at different times of day. With cable, a lot is dependent on use on the same cable "circuit" as you, because the same cable line connects many houses. Therefore your neighbors' usage can affect the quality of your use. In most instances, more than 99% of the time your QoS is likely to be sufficient for your needs. The reason I set a high priority QoS for my Hub & Telo is to ensure that if there is a sudden drop in bandwidth (as I have experienced), any VoIP calls in progress, or to be made, suffer less than they would otherwise.

greginutah wrote:Should I expect a big improvement using Tomato or dd-wrt and configuring QoS? If so, will that improvement be just for voice quality or will it improve the odds of using Ooma with a home alarm and/or fax machine too?

You will not experience an increase in QoS, but you will experience more stable QoS. I fax regularly through the hub, and haven't yet experienced a failure - always using *99-pause-number and standard quality.

I know that dd-wrt supports v8.0 of the WRT54G. It isn't hard to install, and is more versatile that Tomato. The only thing that is harder to configure is QoS - the web-interface does not permit fine granularity of control. However, this is rectified by using iptables directly from a firewall script (for example). There are also programs available on the web, specifically for dd-wrt, that will create such scripts for you. From there, putting them into dd-wrt is simply a matter of cut, paste & save (with a minor edit).

Joyce
#38939 by gglockner
Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:48 am
Tomato has the advantage that you can track bandwidth use, which is useful if your ISP limits your bandwidth. (Comcast limits to 250 GB per month).

I have QoS setup in Tomato and it's straightforward. I also have QoS configured for the VOIP service I use for work. Happy to help if you need advice.
#38955 by greginutah
Mon Dec 28, 2009 1:40 pm
gglockner,

I am considering buying a Linksys WRT54GL so that I can run Tomato (my WRT54G version 8.0 is not supported). It seems like Tomato's QoS would be a lot easier to configure than dd-wrt. So any configuration advice you want to pass on would be appreciated. Thanks!

--Greg

PS: Which brand/model router are you running Tomato on?
#39031 by gglockner
Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:14 am
I have a WRT-54GL. I also have purchased two others for co-workers.

There are two parts to setting up QoS on Tomato firmware. First, you need to select Basic Settings and set the inbound and outbound rates to roughly equal the speed you get from your ISP. Use speedtest.net or something similar to determine your upload and download speeds. You will also need to set the limits. I use the following:

Outbound:
Highest: 80%-100%
High: 10%-100%
Medium: 5%-100%
Low: 3%-100%
Lowest: 2%-95%
Class A: 1%-50%
Class B: 1%-40%
Class C: 1%-30%
Class D: 1%-20%
Class E: 1%-10%

Inbound:
Highest: 100%
All others are none

Then for classification, add the following two rules:

Src MAC: (MAC address of your OOMA)
UDP: Src or Dst 53,123,514,1194,3386,3480,10000-20000
Class: Highest
Description: ooma

Src MAC: (MAC address of your OOMA)
TCP: Src or Dst 43,443
Class: Highest
Description: ooma

I am not a networking engineer, but I have found that this works perfectly for me. Good luck!
#39032 by greginutah
Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:43 am
gglockner,

Thanks for the info. I've been doing a lot of research and your setup is very similar to what others are doing.

How come you have rules for the Ooma MAC and for the ports it uses? If you setup a rule for the MAC of the Ooma it will include all traffic on that MAC, regardless of which port it is on. Right?

Also, I've seen other discussions here and on other sites that indicate some of the same (and some different) ports that are used by Ooma. Basically the main difference being that UDP ports 49000-50000 are used for the RTP stream rather than UDP ports 10000-20000 like you specified. I've also read that call control, signaling, and node management are all tunneled though a VPN on UDP port 1194 to Ooma's call center. So based on that, the main ports to consider are UDP 1194 and UDP 49000-50000. But then I read that someone else saw outbound UDP traffic on ports 3073-3078 for Ooma. With all the discrepancies I see on ports used by Ooma, I figured it would be easiest to just use QoS configured for Ooma's MAC and that would take care of any ports it uses, regardless of what they are. Isn't that correct?

Then I still have ope other remaining question I would still like someone to address... If I setup QoS on my router and have my Ooma Telo behind my router, should I leave the default QoS settings on the Ooma Telo alone, disable it, or change it to some thing else; or does it even matter if it is behind the router?

FYI: I ordered a WRT54GL this morning. Should be here in a few days...

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