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#37452 by Syd
Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:53 am
Good morning Groundhound,
Yes, I do have the Ooma-supplied splitter plugged into the room's DSL/Phone jack, and then the modem and Hub wall port are plugged into that splitter.
Just before I went to bed, I thought to place a dsl filter dongle on the line going to the Hub wall port. And it worked!
Now the phone when in use has a quiet buzz on it and the calls that I've tried so far, seem a bit faint; so my question now is can those issues be rectified?
FYI the Ooma-supplied splitter I received appears to be just a regular splitter. I've seen Ooma related pictures somewhere that suggest something bigger (with maybe more function, e.g. L1, L2, --& a filter?).
Syd
#37454 by murphy
Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:10 am
The best approach for a DSL customer is to split the signals where they come into the house using a DSL filter. The DSL signal is run only to the DSL modem and no place else. The telephone line, with DSL removed is routed to the rest of the house. This keeps the DSL signal from reaching the wall port of the ooma.
#37457 by Groundhound
Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:17 am
Syd wrote:Good morning Groundhound,
Yes, I do have the Ooma-supplied splitter plugged into the room's DSL/Phone jack, and then the modem and Hub wall port are plugged into that splitter.
Just before I went to bed, I thought to place a dsl filter dongle on the line going to the Hub wall port. And it worked!
Now the phone when in use has a quiet buzz on it and the calls that I've tried so far, seem a bit faint; so my question now is can those issues be rectified?
FYI the Ooma-supplied splitter I received appears to be just a regular splitter. I've seen Ooma related pictures somewhere that suggest something bigger (with maybe more function, e.g. L1, L2, --& a filter?).
Syd

Glad you were able to get it to work with the filter. Murphy is correct - if you can get the DSL and phone split outside you will have a better result.

The "L1, L2, L1+2" type of splitter is useful for accessing an unused wire pair in your home's wiring (line 2). If you decide to use the Scout in another room you would need to split the Hub's wall port onto your house line2 wiring and connect it to the Scout's wall port in another room using a second "L1, L2, L1+2" splitter. This is because the HPNA signal between the Hub and Scout does not work well on the same line as a DSL signal. If you have your DSL signal split outside then this won't be needed.

You may see a difference in the buzz & volume when you connect your other phone. If your router is wireless you may have an issue with the 5.8 GHz phone and interference - some of the 5.8 phones also have a 2.4 GHz signal that interferes with wireless routers. Try it and see.
#37460 by Syd
Wed Dec 16, 2009 8:38 am
Thanks Groundhound. Thanks Murphy. I think Costco wont be seeing a returned Ooma (I'll work on that outside splitter idea).
#37500 by southsound
Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:13 pm
For Syd and others who have a problem with DSL and an integrated landline or Scout usage, I thought I would copy some of my previous posts and put them together in one post.

I believe that the Wilcom PS-15 will solve your problem. Click the following link to see how it is wired: http://www.wilcominc.com/product_pdfs/P ... ematic.pdf

You just need to put the PS-15 before all the rest of the phone wiring - and when you do, you can hook up the scout as required. The leads that feed the telephones are completely free of DSL signal, but will pass the required signals for landline integration or for the Scout to work. In this application, you will NOT need any additional DSL microfilters or splitters.

If you have access to where the line comes in from the network interface (usually on the outside of the house) you can place this device ahead of all the interior phone wiring. In our house, the line runs from the network interface to a connection block. The PS-15 has both terminal strip and RJ-11 connections for the line from the telco, the DSL modem, and the telephones. With this device, the modem is not affected by anything on the voice side of the device - and you do not need the DSL microfilters in front of the ooma hub or at each phone. Cost should be about $40 with shipping.

The DSL Splitter is a different device than the microfilter supplied by the telco. In fact, although they have been around for quite a while and Wilcom is a common supplier to the telcos, my installer had never seen one and wanted me to use the microfilters. I had him put his test gear on the splitter and he was amazed. The splitter is still a passive device, but works where the microfilters will not. I knew I needed one because I had over 13 phone devices in our home. No all were phones - 2 ReplayTVs, fax machines, cordless phones, DishNetwork, etc. You can read about the device at the following link: http://www.wilcominc.com/item.cfm?ProdID=35

I hope this helps! :cool:

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