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#36935 by TonyB
Sat Dec 12, 2009 11:50 am
I'm sure there are others out there who port forward, and if so, I hope you can help...

I recently connected a home surveillance DVR system that is web capable. I was instructed to set-up a static IP address and port forward. According to support (DVR surveillance company), I did everything properly with the exception of the Ooma. She had never seen one before so the troubleshooting hit a wall...

My set-up:

DSL modem->Ooma->wired / wireless router (AirPort Extreme).

Ethernet cable from wireless router to surveillance DVR...

I can view the cameras on the 10 or private network, but not over the WAN. She said that it was being blocked, and the Ooma is the most likely culprit.

Any ideas on what settings I should look at and change?

Thanks much!
#36989 by tommies
Sat Dec 12, 2009 3:45 pm
I have my hub behind my router, and doing this requires that the router has to do the QoS instead of ooma hub.

However, you still can do port forwarding on the ooma hub if you decide to keep your current setting. Go to setup.ooma.com, go to Advanced page
  • in the DHCP Configuration section, change the Start and End addresses to the same number--you only need to change the number in the 4th boxes. This will ensure that your router will have the same ip address every time ooma reboot.
  • at Port Forwarding section at bottom of the page, add a new rule for your services, the port and type is as your service required, ip will be ip address of your router assigned by ooma, i.e. the very same ip in the DHCP section above.
In you router seting web interface, add a new rule/port forward, this time, the ip address points to the ip of the device(s) as instructed by manual and/or CS.

Note that the port forwarding in the ooma hub is very similar to the one in the router, the only differences is the one in ooma hub point to the router's ip, and the one in the router point to the device's ip.

Hope this help.
#37016 by TonyB
Sat Dec 12, 2009 8:46 pm
I just got home... I appreciate the replies!

Tommies, what you share sounds encouraging. I believe I follow you, but won't know exactly until I get into Ooma's Advanced set-up...

I will report back, hopefully with good news! Thanks again.
#37026 by TonyB
Sun Dec 13, 2009 1:47 am
Ok, up late, mostly because we have 4 month baby though... Our first, so no complaints.

First, I'm not sure if I can properly test web access from within the LAN. If that's so, I figured that I can VPN on my work laptop, and if that should do the trick, I still don't have access. I tried the DDNS address of the DVR surveillance company, as well as the IP addresses of the Ooma hub and my Airport Extreme (Apple). I can still view the cameras from the 10 address while within the network, and the Ooma still works, so no harm done. Trying to be positive...

On the Advanced Settings:

Home Port
IP Address: 1 (last octet)
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Configuration
Start Address: 10 (last octet)
End Address: 10 (last octet)
DMZ
DMZ Address: 123 (last octet)
Quality Of Service (?)
Upstream Internet Speed (Kbps): 384 (0 to disable)
Downstream Internet Speed (Kbps): 0 (0 to disable)
Reserved Bandwidth for Calls (Kbps): 130


Port Forwarding
Rule Ports Type Forwarded To
1 80 TCP & UDP 10:80 (last octet:port)
========================

Maybe the DMZ?

I'd like to keep the current configuration with the Ooma in the middle; and I forget why I feel that way, but I just remember that after some reading, including on this forum, it was the prudent thing to do... Maybe I should re-visit and consider swapping places with the router. I don't want to throw-in the towel just yet...

Any further input would be greatly appreciated.
#37031 by murphy
Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:18 am
The DMZ address should also be 10.
There is no point to hiding the full IP address that is assigned by the ooma DHCP server. It is a private address that is simultaneously used by millions of other people and by definition is non-routable.
So your settings should be:

DHCP start: 172.27.35.10
DHCP end: 172.27.35.10
DMZ: 172.27.35.10

This will force the IP address assigned to your router to be 172.27.35.10 and everything that comes in from the outside world will flow to the router. If you are using DDNS, you can't use the capability built into your router because it will report the 172 address instead of the actual external IP address for 99.9% of the routers in existence. If you are using DynDNS.org, you must run their client software on your computer to keep your URL up to date.
#37075 by TonyB
Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:18 pm
Thank you murphy.

I now have the DMZ the same as well: 172.27.35.10 (like DHCP start & end)

When I go into the Airport Extreme (router) utility, this is what I see:

IP Address = 172.27.35.123

Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0

Router Address = 172.27.35.1

DNS Server = 4.2.2.6

DHCP beginning address = 10.0.1.2

DHCP ending address = 10.0.1.200

DHCP lease = 4 hours

Under Port Mapping...

Public UDP Ports = 80
Public TCP Ports = 80
Private IP Address = 10.0.1.3 (that of the surveillance DVR)
Private UDP Ports = 80
Private TCP Ports = 80
=======================

If I understood you correctly, the router IP address should have changed to 172.27.35.10. From the above, apparently it has not as it's 172.27.35.1. Maybe there's more that has to be done, but my attempt to change it to 172.27.35.10 made for no internet connectivity... So, I put it back.

Anything else I can try?
#37076 by ifican
Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:38 pm
Many ISP's block incoming port 80 because they dont want web servers running on non business accounts. Either configure the dvr to use another port or try forwarding a different port to port 80 on the dvr ip. Though some apps do not like to work that way, it is worth a try.

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