Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#24169 by inigo montoya
Mon Oct 05, 2009 9:30 am
Hello, I have tried searching but managed to create more questions than I answered. I am considering an Ooma purchase and am strictly looking to swap out my home service. I use DSL for my internet and would like to do the whole house setup, where you can plug the phone into the wall jack and all phone jacks work with that number. I read that is not possible with DSL- is there a work around for this? I have DISH and they charge if you don't plug the box into a phone jack. My computer is in a totally separate part of the house and while I could live with plugging my DECT handsets directly into the OOMA, this wouldn't work for my Dish.
I don't need two lines and can use the voicemail on my handset so don't need premier, would a scout plugged into a jack in the Dish room work to give me a dial tone there?
Thanks.
#24170 by southsound
Mon Oct 05, 2009 9:36 am
In answer to your question about using whole house wiring when you have DSL, yes it is very possible. There are some special considerations I'll go into in another post, but it will work and work well.

Regarding using your cordless phone's built-in voicemail, there may be some problems. With the hub you cannot receive incoming DTMF so you will not be able to use the remote pickup. If you buy the core system (hub and scout packaged together) voicemail is still provided free.

The Telo either does not now but is technically capable of passing DTMF so you may be able to use the remote pickup feature in the future.

More to come.
#24174 by southsound
Mon Oct 05, 2009 9:47 am
The problem with DSL is that it usually travels on the same pair of wires that provide dialtone to the house. This standard was created so the telcos would not have to rewire homes in order to provide service to the majority of customers. In a DSL/Voice system, microfilters are used with the phones to prevent them from degrading the DSL signal. What you need to do for best performance is to separate the DSL signal from the wiring that you use for the ooma. That way you can provide whole-house phone service and still have the best possible Internet performance. You can do this in a number of ways:

1. Keep the DSL modem and signal on the line 1 wiring in your home and use line 2 to provide dialtone to the other phone jacks. Line 1 in modern wiring uses the white/blue pair. The white/orange pair serve line 2. This will mean moving some wires on every jack where you want to use a regular phone and plugging the hub or Telo's PHONE jack into that same pair.

2. Keep all the jacks in the house as they are and move your DSL modem to either a new direct cable to your telco network interface or switch both ends to line 2 wiring for only this connection. In some network interface boxes a short cable is used to connect the house wiring to the telco. Other systems use a hinged connection. If yours uses the wire, you usually have a long enough cable to move it yourself. Then all you need to do is provide a jack for line 2 for your modem.

There are a lot of us on the forum who have done variations of this with great success. There are also quite a few "old telco employees" (not old in age - well strike that in my case - but folks who used to used to work for ma bell) who can help. :cool:
#24175 by hpepper
Mon Oct 05, 2009 9:57 am
southsound wrote:1. Keep the DSL modem and signal on the line 1 wiring in your home and use line 2 to provide dialtone to the other phone jacks. Line 1 in modern wiring uses the white/blue pair. The white/orange pair serve line 2. This will mean moving some wires on every jack where you want to use a regular phone and plugging the hub or Telo's PHONE jack into that same pair.


Southsound is correct - Also, in older homes, where two pairs of wires were typically used - they would be Green/Red for the first pair and Black/Yellow for the second pair.
#24177 by inigo montoya
Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:03 am
Thanks for the quick reply. So much for my hopes of "plug-n-play"! I will check my wiring when I get home, it sounds like the 2nd alternative would be best since it only involves rewiring one-not three jacks. I had the phone jack run by Bell specifically for the computer room so I am hopeful that it will be wired and long enough. If I understand you correctly I would basically take the second phone line and create a whole new jack specifically for it which I can use purely for my dsl-then run the dail tone off the other standard line.
Other than saving $5 on the new plan for vm, would the scout help me in any other fashion if I don't really have the need for two lines?
#24179 by southsound
Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:09 am
Some folks like to use the scout as a small easy device to check for and retrieve voicemail. Mine is still in the box but I may also do this in the future. If you use phones (my recommendation is the new DECT 6 phones from either Uniden or Panasonic) they have built-in voicemail indicators that work well with ooma.
#24180 by hpepper
Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:10 am
inigo montoya wrote:If I understand you correctly I would basically take the second phone line and create a whole new jack specifically for it which I can use purely for my dsl-then run the dail tone off the other standard line.
Other than saving $5 on the new plan for vm, would the scout help me in any other fashion if I don't really have the need for two lines?


Correct on a whole new jack - although you could use a splitter coming out of one jack, that splits both pairs.

I use the Scout (Only one line) as a VM device only - I can retrieve VM from the Hub or Scout.
#24189 by inigo montoya
Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:28 am
That may make life a lot easier. My current DSL modem setup has a splitter plugged into the wall jack with the phone going into one sideand the modem into the other. From what you said I may already have all I need-just put the hub into the phone side and keep the DSL on the other? As wiring illiterate as I am this sounds much cleaner/simpler.
#24193 by hpepper
Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:36 am
Well - the splitter you have may not be an actual splitter but a filter. Both jacks on the splitter may still be on the same pair with the only difference being the phone side has a DSL filter and the DSL modem side is straight to the line - so it actually isn't splitting the line - just providing a spliter for the phoneset.

Clear as mud?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests