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#15858 by mcbleu
Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:36 pm
Good day,

I Have the following configuration
DSL<ROUTER<OOMA<COMPUTER

The computer plugged in the ooma hub cannot access my network.
nor can I see that computer on my network
I can access the internet no problem with that computer

Thank you
EL
#15862 by mcbleu
Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:54 pm
WayneDsr wrote:Why aren't you plugging the pc into the router instead of the ooma hub?

Wayne


due to the physical location of this computer
I don't want to have to run extra cable
or use extra ethernet switch/hub

I try to keep it as minimalist and simple as possible
#15868 by Groundhound
Thu Aug 13, 2009 9:05 pm
mcbleu wrote:Good day,

I Have the following configuration
DSL<ROUTER<OOMA<COMPUTER

The computer plugged in the ooma hub cannot access my network.
nor can I see that computer on my network
I can access the internet no problem with that computer

Your's is an unusual setup, and there's not enough information given to provide a definitive answer, but I'll make an assumption that your router's DHCP server is handing out LAN addresses in the 192.168.1.xxx range, with netmask of 255.255.255.0. The problem is that the Ooma hub also wants to act as a router and hand out addresses to devices connected to it's Home Port in the 172.27.35.xxx range by default, a different network. You can probably get the result you want by making a couple of changes in the Ooma hub's setup so that the hub's Home Port operates on the same IP network as the router, but on fixed IP's that are outside of the DHCP start and finish addresses in the router. So I'll make a second assumption and say your router's DHCP range is between 192.168.1.100 and some higher IP like 192.168.1.149. This leaves static IP's available on the same net between 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.99. My third assumption is that the router assigns itself the address 192.168.1.1, so that one will not be available for use in the hub – likewise for any other fixed IP's on your current network; but there should be a number of unused fixed IP's available.

So if my assumptions are correct, go to http://setup.ooma.com from the computer connected to the hub's home port and make the following changes on the Advanced settings page:

1. Change Home Port IP Address to an unused fixed IP, say 192.168.1.5, with Netmask of 255.255.255.0
2. Change DHCP Configuration to be the same start and end address, say 192.168.1.6 (enter the same number in both Start and End Address fields).
3. Click Update

After clicking update, you will need to power cycle the hub and reboot your computer. Your computer should then have the IP 192.168.1.6 assigned to it and, hopefully, be able to access your network.
#15897 by ggilman
Fri Aug 14, 2009 5:06 am
Nice try, Groundhound but I don't believe that will work. Routers really don't like being on the same network on both sides. The entire way they work is when a packet comes in, it looks at all of the networks it is connected to and makes the best decision on which of these available networks to send that packet. If any of the ports are configured to the same network, the router just can't know what to do with them.

Another issue is that regardless of which network the ooma ports reside on, a router does not generally forward any broadcast messages. Much of the communication for network browsing uses broadcast messages so that is lost entirely.

In your case, the easiest way to look at a router is either being on the "inside", or LAN, vs. being on the "outside", which is normally the Internet. Obviously you don't want the same type of traffic on both. You want your shared printers and folders to be visible to those on the "inside" but not those on the "outside". In your case, since your computer is behind the hub, which is a router, the entire rest of your network is on the "outside". You should actually be able to communicate with them via protocols you'd expect to work over the Internet like ftp, http, etc... (assuming no firewall issues with the hub), but not with LAN type protocols (folder browsing, direct printing, etc...).

Now, "Can" you get things to work the way you want? Likely yes. However, not easily. It's not meant to work how you want. You could set up a VPN, a network relay agent, or some other solution. However, I believe you'll find any of these ways to be far more complicated than running a 2nd line or making your PC wireless. While your goal is to "keep it as minimalist and simple as possible", you're actually going the opposite direction with your current setup.
#15906 by Groundhound
Fri Aug 14, 2009 6:31 am
ggilman wrote:Nice try, Groundhound but I don't believe that will work.

Admittedly a bit of a long shot, but one easy to try with no cost. If it doesn't work then a switch is likely the only option short of pulling more wire.
#15951 by mcbleu
Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:07 am
Groundhound wrote:
ggilman wrote:Nice try, Groundhound but I don't believe that will work.

Admittedly a bit of a long shot, but one easy to try with no cost. If it doesn't work then a switch is likely the only option short of pulling more wire.



Thank you "Groundhound" for the help
I wish it worked but it did not
But what you write make total sense

Ooma should come with an update that should allow people to use my set-up

INTERNET < Router/Network < ooma < computer
#15952 by mcbleu
Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:12 am
ggilman wrote:Nice try, Groundhound but I don't believe that will work. Routers really don't like being on the same network on both sides. The entire way they work is when a packet comes in, it looks at all of the n......................................
.....................ou're actually going the opposite direction with your current setup.


you are right it didn't work
Thank's for all the info

I will have to install a switch
#15990 by ggilman
Fri Aug 14, 2009 7:32 pm
Ooma should come with an update that should allow people to use my set-up

The issue has nothing to do with the Ooma, but rather the differences in how routers and switches behave. Routers and switches differ in both purpose and hardware design.

Ooma decided to make their device as a router such that it can work in its 'suggested' configuration, directly behind the cable modem and usable with or without a router behind that. In this position, as a router, it can manage QoS and if you don't have another router already, still allows you access to the Internet & provides some level of firewall. While it works fine behind another router on its own, the router capability and port are almost entirely useless, as you are now painfully aware.

As a switch, these benefits would be lost and the added benefit of a one port switch is minimal at best. Rather than making it a switch, they would have just eliminated the port. In your case, it would be helpful but I think generally you are the exception.

All of this is really just to say I don't think they will ever alter the device to work the way you wish. From their standpoint, it would serve very little benefit, eliminate the sizable benefits of the current design and require major hardware change, not just a firmware patch.

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