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#15172 by liane66
Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:14 pm
Hi I am just getting started and have not ported my number yet but:

1) Once my landline is gone (turned off) can I split the "out phone" from the ooma hub to a phone and the wall and get a dialtone on the other phones?

2) I did not connect the ooma hub "out home" and everything works fine. I have Verizon FIOS and when I connected the "out home" to my computer I could not connect to the Internet through the computer. Instead I leave the computer connected wired to the modem.router

Rob
#15394 by RickAnderson
Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:42 am
The condition of your phone wiring in the home will have an effect. I've lived in homes where I found phones wires connected simply by twisting them together and left bare in the ceiling. I had problems connecting multiple phones to the landline service in that home.

I now live in a home that has CAT5 wires, properly terminated at each end for the current phone wiring, I've tried the trick of connecting the "Phone" port on the Ooma to the wall jack, and I get a solid signal to all my phones plugged into the wall. I haven't worked with it much, since I'm waiting for old number to port over still; just have one phone on the Ooma until then, I'll probably switch over the whole house to Ooma once the porting is done.

If you're little more advanced than the average user, you may want to consider what I'm going to try. I'm going to connect the phone wiring to the whole house to the "Phone" port, to have Ooma at every phone port in the house. BUT, I'm going to also rig up a way to still use the scout at an port as well.

Your phone wiring typical has at least 2 pairs, sometimes 3, even 4 pairs if the builder used CAT5, like mine. (Although, typical phone jacks installed in the wall (RJ14) only have 2 pairs), RJ25 fits the exact same phone plugs has 3 pairs. RJ45 is needed to plug into the 4 pairs, its the computer network port, and yes you can actually plug a phone jack into it. (Remember, never plug computer network equipment into a phone service, it will fry the computer equipment, only phone modems for computers can be plugged into phone services and NOT be damaged.)

Rig up a cross-over like phone line, so the center 2 contacts on one side of the cable is moved over to the outside 2 contacts (for a 2 pair cable) or the outermost contacts (for a 3 pair cable) on the opposite end of the cable. You can get the crimpable plugs at RadioShack, also a crimping tool, but they are expensive, look for a used one on e-bay (or find a junction box that crosses-over for you or you can splice wires inside a box.) Make 2 cross-over cables like this. One for the scout and one for the "Home" port on the Ooma. Plug them into the ooma and scout and the wall. The crossover cable will carry the scout signal over the 2nd or 3rd pair of you household phone wiring, leaving the primary pair of the household phone wiring still carrying the ooma signal to all phones.
Last edited by RickAnderson on Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
#15395 by Aveamantium
Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:47 am
RickAnderson wrote:Rig up a cross-over like phone line, so the center 2 contacts on one side of the cable is moved over to the outside 2 contacts (for a 2 pair cable) or the outermost contacts (for a 3 pair cable) on the opposite end of the cable. Make 2 cross-over cables like this. One for the scout and one for the "Home" port on the Ooma. Plug them into the ooma and scout and the wall. The crossover cable will carry the scout signal over the 2nd or 3rd pair of you household phone wiring, leaving the primary pair of the household phone wiring still carrying the ooma signal to all phones.

You can also use those L1, L2, L1+L2 splitters to accomplish the "moving" of pair contacts if you're not willing to rig this up. I'm lazy and did it this way... :)

Edit: I would be remiss if I didn't say welcome to ooma liane66 and RickAnderson!
#15397 by RickAnderson
Mon Aug 10, 2009 9:50 am
Not lazy, smart, you'd probably spend more on the tool to crimp the plugs on the end of the phone cable than a couple of those little cross-over boxes cost. Smart way to go, unless you're a geek like me that loves doing projects that need those tools.
#15454 by scottlindner
Mon Aug 10, 2009 3:18 pm
RickAnderson wrote:Not lazy, smart, you'd probably spend more on the tool to crimp the plugs on the end of the phone cable than a couple of those little cross-over boxes cost. Smart way to go, unless you're a geek like me that loves doing projects that need those tools.


I'm the geek like you. I have run two lines of Cat6 to each room, use an RJ45 phone module in the network rack so I can switch a line from network to phone with a patch cable, and built my own RJ45 to RJ11 cables based on my needs. The primary reason I did the last part was to put the Hub/Scout communication on Line 3. I have the Hub Phone port on Line 1 and the Scout Phone port on Line 2 so I can plug into any port in the house and expect two line service. I also ran a dedicated Cat5 from the demarc to my network rack, and disconnected all of the original two line wires so I have perfect signal for my DSL. Do I qualify as the same type of geek as you? :)

Scott

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