Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#11969 by whatshesaid
Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:26 pm
I activated and installed an Ooma hub and scout yesterday. All Ooma unit and all phone operations I have tested are working. I also have internet access from my desktop PC, where my hub is located. However, since the install my wireless network is down-- neither laptop is detecting the network, even though All lights on my router are green. I called Ooma support, which was not able to rectify the problem and said the problem was not Ooma related. Coincidentally, in the past, my phone company had to install a new modem and also told me my router was defective. It turned out that there was a problem with the channel settings for each device. A friend said today that "my new device should be able to operate on different channels. Probably it is trying to use the same as the wireless internet." I called Ooma support intending to ask them this specific question, but they would not let me. If anyone could explain how I can troubleshoot this problem, I would be most appreciative.
#11970 by southsound
Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:36 pm
The ooma hub should not present any problem with your wireless network. It is strictly a wired device. However, there could be a couple of things that ou will want to check:

1. What kind of phone are you using with the ooma hub? If it is a 2.4ghz (or even a 5.8ghz) model, be aware that it uses the same frequency spectrum as your wireless network. I have a 2.4ghz Plantronics that kills my wireless when I use it.

2. How is your hub connected? Is it modem<>hub<>router or modem<>router<>hub? Where is your wireless coming from - the modem or the router?

3. From your post I assume you have DSL. Are you using the wall jack on the hub? If so, how are you connecting it? Are you using a scout?

Let us know the additional information in 2 and 3 and we'll be able to give some troubleshooting advice.
#11971 by whatshesaid
Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:39 pm
oooh! It is a 5.8 GHz phone. I don't have any other types of phones in the house to switch out right now, but are you saying that if I were to hook up a different type of phone, that would solve my problem? (Fingers crossed it will be that easy)

I do have dsl and am using a hub and a scout. I'm not exactly sure how to detect which "order" the hardware is in, though from reading the forums it seems to be pretty important. I followed the installation just as the quick start showed, and all seemed to be in order when tech support called out what cables should be going into what.
Last edited by whatshesaid on Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#11973 by southsound
Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:41 pm
Good possibility. Even though the 5.8ghz phones are not supposed to interfere with wireless, I've found that many use a 2.4ghz subchannel for signalling. Why not unplug the wireless phone (power supply and all) and try a phone from a different room - possibly a wired model - to see if your wireless comes back?
#11978 by southsound
Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:48 pm
You can tell the order by seeing what is plugged into the modem. If it has several RJ45 network connections it is also a router. And if it has an antenna, it is also the source of your wireless Internet. Then on to the (I assume) separate router - is it plugged into the "home" port on the hub?

You mentioned that the wireless was down - does your ooma still work OK? How about the scout? Sometimes there is interaction between your DSL signal and your scout wiring - but this would not bring down ONLY your wireless.

I know I've asked a lot of questions, but the more info, the better our answer.
#11985 by southsound
Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:28 pm
Great news! And now that things are up and running as they should be, let me welcome you to the ooma family! Lots of good folks on this forum and I recommend visiting it often so you can use your experience to help others. Only thing you miss with ooma is that fat bill from the telco!
#11988 by WayneDsr
Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:55 pm
That just goes to show you that sometimes it is the simplest things that make the biggest difference. There are some that would argue that the phone was NOT causing the issue.
Glad to see "whatshesaid" jumped right in and got it fixed!

Welcome to the forums!

Wayne
#12079 by iSEPIC
Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:39 pm
southsound wrote:Good possibility. Even though the 5.8ghz phones are not supposed to interfere with wireless, I've found that many use a 2.4ghz subchannel for signalling. Why not unplug the wireless phone (power supply and all) and try a phone from a different room - possibly a wired model - to see if your wireless comes back?


I think this is for the older wireless routers - as the newer ones now also operate in the 5ghz band (802.11n and some newer 802.11g) - and will unfortunately have interference with cordless phones. However, most of them will sense the trouble and try new channels - but maybe it was too close together or something like that where it was bleeding over.
#12083 by southsound
Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:40 pm
iSEPIC wrote:
southsound wrote:Good possibility. Even though the 5.8ghz phones are not supposed to interfere with wireless, I've found that many use a 2.4ghz subchannel for signalling. Why not unplug the wireless phone (power supply and all) and try a phone from a different room - possibly a wired model - to see if your wireless comes back?


I think this is for the older wireless routers - as the newer ones now also operate in the 5ghz band (802.11n and some newer 802.11g) - and will unfortunately have interference with cordless phones. However, most of them will sense the trouble and try new channels - but maybe it was too close together or something like that where it was bleeding over.

I think we'll still see a lot of 2.4ghz networks for the next several years. In fact, 8.2.11g systems are ALL 2.4ghz as defined by the protocol. 802.11a/h/j/n operate in the 5ghz spectrum. From a Broadcom whitepaper titled "802.11n: Next-Generation Wireless LAN Technology", 'The draft 802.11n specification was crafted with the previous standards in mind to ensure compatibility with more than 200 million Wi-Fi devices currently in use. A draft-n access point will communicate with 802.11a devices on the 5-GHz band as well as 802.11b and 802.11g hardware on the 2.4-GHz frequencies.'

Since the newer draft-n routers maintain compatibility with older protocols, a 2.4ghz signal can still cause havoc - especially if it is a up against a brute force system like my Plantronics cordless. The best solution is to go with a modern DECT 6.0 phone system for any new purchases. That way you are safe regardless of the network used. For many of us, we are locked in to using 802.11g or lower due to equipment that is not yet available in the higher band - my iPod Touch G2 is one example. For that matter, I would much rather use wired networking except for devices like the iPod.

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