Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#108092 by bruce3404
Sat Mar 23, 2013 6:34 pm
In two days, I need to go into the design center for my new home and tell them where I want phone jacks, so I need to do this correctly or deal with the consequences later. I'll be carrying my trusty Ooma hub and scout between my permanent home and vacation home (the one that's being built). Given that I'm grandfathered into a taxless rate, I have no desire to upgrade.

I know that I need to place the Ooma hub next to the router. I plan to use a Panasonic cordless phone system. Can I just plug the Panasonic system "brain" into the Ooma hub and avoid having to pay for an additional phone outlet? I'm thinking that with such a set up, the Scout will be of no value. Or must I place an additional phone outlet adjacent to the router? Unfortunately, I'm not at home and I don't see any specific installation instructions on the Ooma site for the hub.
#108093 by lbmofo
Sat Mar 23, 2013 8:31 pm
In general, you'd want a phone jack in every room in your house. Kitchen, dining, family, study, living... All of them.
#108096 by Hollywood
Sun Mar 24, 2013 2:15 am
bruce3404 wrote:I plan to use a Panasonic cordless phone system. Can I just plug the Panasonic system "brain" into the Ooma hub and avoid having to pay for an additional phone outlet?


yes as long as the location of the Panasonic base unit is likely to be able to transmit to all areas of the house.
#108101 by bruce3404
Sun Mar 24, 2013 8:48 am
Thanks, Hollywood. That's pretty much what I thought. After more rumination, I've decided to spring for the extra $50 and have them install a jack near the Ooma hub so I can use my Scout in a more central area of the house rather than having to run into the den every time I want to check for messages. And lbmofo, while I can understand wanting as many phone jacks as possible, at $50 a throw, it makes more sense to me to just use a cordless system.
#108104 by Hollywood
Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:32 am
I don't know who your internet provider will be, but obviously you need a cable TV jack if it's cablemodem OR a phone jack if it's DSL to the location where you want to place your modem/router.
#108105 by Cyberchat
Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:42 am
bruce3404 wrote:In two days, I need to go into the design center for my new home and tell them where I want phone jacks, so I need to do this correctly or deal with the consequences later. I'll be carrying my trusty Ooma hub and scout between my permanent home and vacation home (the one that's being built). Given that I'm grandfathered into a taxless rate, I have no desire to upgrade.

I know that I need to place the Ooma hub next to the router. I plan to use a Panasonic cordless phone system. Can I just plug the Panasonic system "brain" into the Ooma hub and avoid having to pay for an additional phone outlet? I'm thinking that with such a set up, the Scout will be of no value. Or must I place an additional phone outlet adjacent to the router? Unfortunately, I'm not at home and I don't see any specific installation instructions on the Ooma site for the hub.


Construction of a new house presents a unique opportunity to do the "low-voltage" wiring correctly for the digital world in which we now live. When we constructed a new house a few years ago, we specified a Media Distribution Center which handles the distribution of Phone, TV, Video (i.e., in-home video streaming, security cameras, ...), Audio, Alarm, LAN (local area network), distributed remote controls, and other low-voltage applications. For the wiring specs, you place the low-voltage outlet boxes and power outlets to support planned placements of devices (TV's, phones, computers, Audio Receivers/Amps, speakers, ...). The low-voltage wiring for data purposes (using at least CAT-5e but preferably CAT-6) is strung from the outlet boxes back to the patch panel location. The key here is to use high-quality "twisted-pair" wiring to avoid noise/interference issues. The outside services (TV/cable, Internet, Phone, Alarm, ....) are dropped into the patch panel. Coax outlets for TV are placed throughout the residence (at least a pair of outlets at each location with separate wiring back to the patch panel is installed). Short jumper cables are used in the patch panel to make the connections from services to the specific outlet boxes as your needs change over time. The low-voltage data outlet boxes are specified with RJ45 data jacks rather than RJ11/RJ14 residential phone jacks since the data lines wired using the CAT-5/6 wiring into the RJ45 jacks can be used interchangably for LAN outlets or phone outlets as well as other low-voltage uses (at least a pair of data outlets at each location with separate wiring back to the patch panel is installed).

Wow, this sounds complex, expensive and overkill for a new residence, ...., right? Actually its not! Relatively low cost patch panels and their components are readily available from various distributors and retail outlets like Lowes and Home Depot. Like you've experienced, in new construction is pretty inexpensive (about $50) to drop a data outlet into a wall anyplace you believe you might need data outlet in the future. As you know, it can be very expensive to retrofit an existing home with such data outlets.

But why even consider going to this patch panel approach in the age of wireless communications? I mean, even AT&T with its U-Verse technology is advocating streaming video wirelessly throughout the home, right? The main reason is that "wired" is always better than wireless for consistent high-quality data communications. Wireless is susceptible to collisions, interference and interception from radiation sources from both inside and outside the residence. Even as wireless moves into new frequency spectrums which initially provides good services because of low usage the user experience can deteriorate over time as move and more services pile into the new frequency spectrums and more and more collisions occur.

We use both wired and wireless successfully with good user experiences. Because of our patch panel setup, Ii can deploy the OOMA Telo anyplace in the residence I so desire, remote from the WAN service drop/modem/router locations and can freely configure the Telo to be between the modem/router or after the router as my desires and needs change. I can do this because I always had at least a pair of RJ45 data outlets dropped around the residence in each location where we believed we might need data services sometime in the future.

My WAN service drop/modem/router location is right next to the Patch Panel location. The Telo location is at a work desk location so I can have access to the Telo's panel of buttons although I rarely use them. Our configuration is currently Modem-->Router-->Telo. Our Dect-6.0 base station/answering system is located on a desk in the kitchen and through the patch panel its connected to the Telo. Four remote Dect-6.0 wireless phones and a Dect-6.0 headset round out the wireless setup.
#108117 by bruce3404
Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:02 pm
Sounds like you really did it right. Unfortunately, since I'm buying in a tract home development, I'm not allowed to do any of my own wiring and the developer wants an obscene amount to do a really good network wiring job. Fortunately, I can crawl around in the attic and drop various cables where they need to go and save several thousand dollars. FWIW, I put in a then-pioneer ON Q system in a home I constructed 13 years ago, but my electrician didn't really understand the system, nor did I and by the time a few cable and phone company guys got into it, it was pretty much rendered useless. What really killed me was that I didn't get a road map for where things went.

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