Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#104943 by New Ooma User
Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:18 pm
Attached below is a link for a TII Model 325 Signal Circuit Protector that is used to connect the phone company lines to my house wiring. Can someone please tell me which of the following lines I should remove (except of course for the center ground wire):

1) remove the phone company lines
2) remove the house wiring lines
3) remove all lines

http://www.telephonecentral.com/lit/110401_ds.pdf

Also, whichever wires I remove do I just electrical tape them individually or do any of them need to be spliced together?
#104944 by southsound
Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:01 pm
Just remove the house wiring from the block. If there are several wires to one screw, connect all of the like colored lines together using a scotchlock or similar connector. If just one wire then insulate it with tape so the internal house wiring doesn't get shorted out. The utility wiring and the ground line should remain on the block.
#104945 by New Ooma User
Sat Jan 05, 2013 11:07 pm
southsound wrote:Just remove the house wiring from the block. If there are several wires to one screw, connect all of the like colored lines together using a scotchlock or similar connector. If just one wire then insulate it with tape so the internal house wiring doesn't get shorted out. The utility wiring and the ground line should remain on the block.


Thanks, that helps a lot. Just to verify, if the like colored house wires are on the same screw I use a scotchlock and if same colored house wires are on different screws then insulate them individually with tape...correct?
#104951 by thunderbird
Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:24 am
New Ooma User wrote:Attached below is a link for a TII Model 325 Signal Circuit Protector that is used to connect the phone company lines to my house wiring. Can someone please tell me which of the following lines I should remove (except of course for the center ground wire):

1) remove the phone company lines
2) remove the house wiring lines
3) remove all lines

http://www.telephonecentral.com/lit/110401_ds.pdf

Also, whichever wires I remove do I just electrical tape them individually or do any of them need to be spliced together?

Remove the phone company wires, and tape and tag them idividually, leaving the center ground wires connected. Tag mean you idetify where the wire came from and that it is an old phone company wire. This will help anyone looking at the phone box ten years from now???

Next connect a phone cord from the Phone port of the Ooma Telo to a house wall jack. If you want another phone at this location, purchase and install a phone cord splitter at that location.

Take a phone and go around to all the jacks in your home and test for the Ooma dial tone.
#104955 by murphy
Sun Jan 06, 2013 7:49 am
New Ooma User wrote:Ok, southsound says to remove the house wires and thunderbird says to remove the phone company wires. Either one is wrong or it doesn't matter and both are correct. Can someone please clarify for me what course of action I should take.

Leave the phone company wires in place so they remain connected to the surge (lightning) arrester.
Disconnect the house wires.
#104960 by thunderbird
Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:58 am
As long as the ground wires remain connected, there is no difference.

The reason that I suggested that the old telephone wires be removed is because there is often more then one set of phone wires going into the house, connected from the phone terminal block. By removing just the old phone company wires and taping them (probably two wires), the other wires going into the house stay together and don't have to be spliced together to feed the entire house.
#104962 by murphy
Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:32 am
thunderbird wrote:As long as the ground wires remain connected, there is no difference.

The reason that I suggested that the old telephone wires be removed is because there is often more then one set of phone wires going into the house, connected from the phone terminal block. By removing just the old phone company wires and taping them (probably two wires), the other wires going into the house stay together and don't have to be spliced together to feed the entire house.

It makes a big difference if you don't want lightning dancing through your house. If you remove the phone company wires they no longer have a path to ground. If the pole infrastructure out in the street gets hit by lightning the high voltage gets piped right into the house and lightning can jump anywhere it pleases. That it why in the newer boxes you just disconnect the plug. The plug is the house wiring. The socket is the phone company wiring and is connected to the surge suppressor.
#104963 by thunderbird
Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:46 am
murphy wrote:
thunderbird wrote:As long as the ground wires remain connected, there is no difference.

The reason that I suggested that the old telephone wires be removed is because there is often more then one set of phone wires going into the house, connected from the phone terminal block. By removing just the old phone company wires and taping them (probably two wires), the other wires going into the house stay together and don't have to be spliced together to feed the entire house.

It makes a big difference if you don't want lightning dancing through your house. If you remove the phone company wires they no longer have a path to ground. If the pole infrastructure out in the street gets hit by lightning the high voltage gets piped right into the house and lightning can jump anywhere it pleases. That it why in the newer boxes you just disconnect the plug. The plug is the house wiring. The socket is the phone company wiring and is connected to the surge suppressor.

If you really want to be technical, why would you want to protect the old unused phone company wiring coming into the house?

Most people would certainly want to protect the house phone wiring from lightening strikes, power surges, or shorts from other power sources. Leaving the house phone wiring connected to the terminal block does that.

The Ground wire that comes in with the phone company wiring, if left connected to the junction box ground stud, provides a path to ground for the old phone company phone wiring in case of a lightening strike of the old phone company wiring.
#104965 by murphy
Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:03 am
thunderbird wrote:If you really want to be technical, why would you want to protect the old unused phone company wiring coming into the house?

I'm not protecting the phone company wiring. When lightning gets to the end of an unterminated wire it doesn't stop. It jumps to the nearest metallic object. It needs to be grounded so there is a low impedance path to ground.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 9 guests