Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#104735 by arkiedan
Sun Dec 30, 2012 7:22 am
I can sure use some help from the techies among you.

I installed Ooma a week ago, cable modem-ooma-router. After the adjustments (qos at 85%, "use built in", etc.) phone conversations sound pretty good. However, I have a rather major problem. I use my Sony HDTV for streaming movies from Amazon.com and, since the Ooma installation, quality is in the toilet (about equal to old VCR quality!) Without Ooma, video and audio is excellent. Computer speed doesn't appear to be affected but I'd go back (makes me sick to think about it) to AT&T before accepting this poor streaming quality.

I'm going to try modem-router-ooma but, since my ten year old router has no qos, trying to setup that way was terrible (Folks on the other end could not hear me or I could not hear them. VOIP test scores were terrible.) I've ordered a refurb Linksys E2500 on which I can set qos. Hopefully, that configuration will work for me.

My questions are:

I'm assuming that the Ooma, plugged into one of the lan ports on the new router, is just another network device, leaving the router to allocate priority for both the Ooma and the TV (and, perhaps, their bandwidth usage?). Is that true?

Does the Ooma Telo reserve a constant % of the bandwidth for phone use or does it pass the full bandwidth unless the phone system is in use? Based on the change in my streaming I'm assuming it hogs quite a bit all the time.

And, there seems to be differing opinions regarding setting the Telo's qos when setup behind the router, some saying set to "0", others saying set to a percentage in all configurations. Logic dictates it should be set to "0", since the home network port is unoccupied. Is there a definitive answer?

By the way. A few of my current test results look pretty good (still, my streamed videos are lousy):

Down: 3745 kbps
Up: 488 kbps
COS: 98%
TCP Delay: 80 ms
Jitter-out: 4.2ms
Jitter-in: .2ms

This is with the most basic cable service but, as I said above, it's been great until now.
#104737 by thunderbird
Sun Dec 30, 2012 7:34 am
arkiedan wrote:I can sure use some help from the techies among you.

I installed Ooma a week ago, cable modem-ooma-router. After the adjustments (qos at 85%, "use built in", etc.) phone conversations sound pretty good. However, I have a rather major problem. I use my Sony HDTV for streaming movies from Amazon.com and, since the Ooma installation, quality is in the toilet (about equal to old VCR quality!) Without Ooma, video and audio is excellent. Computer speed doesn't appear to be affected but I'd go back (makes me sick to think about it) to AT&T before accepting this poor streaming quality.

I'm going to try modem-router-ooma but, since my ten year old router has no qos, trying to setup that way was terrible (Folks on the other end could not hear me or I could not hear them. VOIP test scores were terrible.) I've ordered a refurb Linksys E2500 on which I can set qos. Hopefully, that configuration will work for me.

My questions are:



arkiedan wrote:I'm assuming that the Ooma, plugged into one of the lan ports on the new router, is just another network device, leaving the router to allocate priority for both the Ooma and the TV (and, perhaps, their bandwidth usage?). Is that true?

Yes

arkiedan wrote:Does the Ooma Telo reserve a constant % of the bandwidth for phone use or does it pass the full bandwidth unless the phone system is in use? Based on the change in my streaming I'm assuming it hogs quite a bit all the time.

It is supposed to reserve bandwidth only during a call. But lately it hasn't behaved in that manor.

arkiedan wrote:And, there seems to be differing opinions regarding setting the Telo's qos when setup behind the router, some saying set to "0", others saying set to a percentage in all configurations. Logic dictates it should be set to "0", since the home network port is unoccupied. Is there a definitive answer?

Ooma says to use Zero for a Modem-Router-Ooma connection, which shuts off Quality of Service in the Ooma Telo.

arkiedan wrote:By the way. A few of my current test results look pretty good (still, my streamed videos are lousy):

Down: 3745 kbps
Up: 488 kbps
COS: 98%
TCP Delay: 80 ms
Jitter-out: 4.2ms
Jitter-in: .2ms

This is with the most basic cable service but, as I said above, it's been great until now.

Your upload speed is pretty close to the low end edge, and may give problems during Internet provider heavy use times. The Ooma Telo default QoS Upstream setting is now 512 Kbps.

I would connect Modem-Router-Ooma.

Which ever way you connect, set MAC address to use Built In. Procedure below.

To help stabilize your Ooma Internet connection turn off MAC address Spoofing, which can cause dropped calls, garbled voice, and other problems, by doing the following:
If your Ooma device is connected Modem-Ooma-Router, access your Ooma Setup pages by typing http://172.27.35.1 in your computer browser window. The Ooma Setup pages open. Click on Internet, go down to INTERNET Port MAC Address: and change setting from Automatic to Use Built In. Click on Update device. Remove power from your Modem and the Ooma Device. Repower the Modem. When the Modem is done booting repower your Ooma device.

If your connection is Modem-Router-Ooma or Modem/router-Ooma, temporarily connect a network cable from your Ooma device home port, to the wired LAN port of a computer. Temporarily turn off Wi-Fi in the computer, if turned on. Reboot the computer. Access your Ooma Setup pages by typing http://172.27.35.1 in your computer browser window. The Ooma Setup pages open. Click on Internet, go down to INTERNET Port MAC Address: and change setting from Automatic to Use Built In. Click on Update device. Remove power from your Modem (or Modem/Router), your Router (skip to Ooma Device if have Modem/Router) and Ooma Device. Repower the Modem (or Modem/Router). When the Modem is done booting repower your Router (skip to Ooma Device if have Modem/Router). When the Router is done booting, repower your Ooma device.
#104740 by murphy
Sun Dec 30, 2012 7:43 am
I have always run my Telo behind my router with nothing connected to the Home port.
In that configuration QOS is not needed and is turned off by setting both QOS values to 0.

When the Telo QOS is being used it only reserves bandwidth when a call is in progress.
I have a gigabit speed network so there is no way I would put the 100 megabit Telo in front of my router.

If you have what is called economy speed service from your cable company that may be part of the problem.
The way they enforce the low speed is to delay packets so they arrive at a rate that is consistent with the speed.
Delayed packets are fine when browsing the internet on your computer.
They can be a problem in a real time data stream such as VOIP or video.
#104742 by arkiedan
Sun Dec 30, 2012 8:33 am
Thanks for the quick responses,

I'm aware my basic service could cause problems during extreme heavy loads but the above VOIP test numbers are from early morning, minimum traffic hours and they are within Ooma's recommended specs, quite good, in fact. And, as I type this, the phone is unused, the TV is streaming a movie and it's obviously being throttled down to a crawl. The video is horrendous! The Ooma Telo is clearly grabbing a chunk of bandwidth, even when unused. For the life of me, I can't understand why this is necessary.

A short while ago, just because I was in a bad mood, I removed the Ooma Telo from the system and tried streaming Amazon Prime to the TV. Image quality was once again a very acceptable 720p HD. So, when the Linksys router arrives and I get it properly configured in a modem-router-ooma setup I'll try the ISPs next tier, 1.6gb upstream, to see if that helps the situation (or is even necessary.)

By the way, all the packet numbers in the VOIP test indicate 0% loss, 0% discards and 0% out of order.

Thanks again ,

old arkiedan

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