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#94152 by pfurse
Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:54 am
I want to wire Ooma into my patch panel. I see the splitter option has worked for many. The patch panel would essentially be a four-way split. Before I start punching down and crimping, has anyone attempted this? The customer support rep had no idea what I was talking about and just gave a generic "not possible" answer to play it safe.

Not possible or not supported? If the land line phones have AC power, I don't need to worry about power going over the lines- just signal.
#94153 by murphy
Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:58 am
The patch panel will work fine as long as it has been disconnected from the incoming phone line from the traditional phone company.
#94155 by pfurse
Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:00 am
Sweet. Have you done it?

Ooma would essentially be the telo line-in on the panel and then split to the rest of the house.
#94156 by murphy
Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:10 am
pfurse wrote:Sweet. Have you done it?

Ooma would essentially be the telo line-in on the panel and then split to the rest of the house.

Not with a patch panel. I used double row terminal strips with screw terminals.

Yes, the Telo phone jack should be connected to the patch panel's input point for a phone line.
#94164 by Cyberchat
Mon Mar 19, 2012 12:23 pm
pfurse wrote:I want to wire Ooma into my patch panel. I see the splitter option has worked for many. The
patch panel would essentially be a four-way split. Before I start punching down and crimping, has anyone
attempted this? The customer support rep had no idea what I was talking about and just gave a generic "not
possible" answer to play it safe.

Not possible or not supported? If the land line phones have AC power, I don't need to worry about power going
over the lines- just signal.


Pfurse,

I have a pair of Leviton SMC (Structured Media Center) patch panels installed, each with a TLDM (Telephone Line Distribution Module) which are wired together to function as one expanded TLDM. I'm using the OOMA Telo device successfully with the SMC patch panels.

Some questions for you: Do you have a TLDM installed in your patch panel? What type of patch panel do you have? How many phone lines do you intend to route through your patch panel? Do you now have or do you plan in the future to have a security system connected to your patch panel to use one of your phone lines for security emergencies? Do you plan to use the OOMA VOIP phone service for your security system?

In the following, I'm going to state a bunch of stuff which is probably familiar to you but might not be to other forum readers.

Prior to switching to the OOMA Telo VOIP service, I had VOIP service from the local cable TV company. I did have the cable TV telephone service punched down on to the TLDM's "110 IDC" connector used to connect incoming phone service to the TLDM. From there the phone signals are routed within the TLDM to the Test Port. A short patch cord is then used to connect between the Test Port and an Auxiliary Disconnect Outlet (ADO) within the TLDM which provides a bridge between the incoming lines and the columns of RJ45 ports in the TLDM used to distribute telephone service in combinations of 2 or 4 lines. The Test Port provides an easy way to disconnect all of the household lines and plug a handset into the TLDM for phone line testing purposes. The TLDM also includes a security connection and the over-ride logic for a specified phone line for handling security emergencies. In an emergency situation the security port over-rides telephone service to the specified line when an alarm is activated. Within the TLDM the security feature may be configured to be activated on any one of the up-to-4 terminated phone lines.

Within the TLDM's columns of incoming telephone line RJ45 (eight wire) ports there are usually options for distributing telephone lines in combinations of 2 or 4 lines, such as; 1,2,3,4, or 1,2, or 1,3, or 1,4, or 2,3, or 3,4, .... Within the SMC you probably have Cat-5e VDM's (Voice and Data Modules) installed into which the data lines from your data ports scattered throughout your residence are punched down. Short Cat-5e jumper cables are used to bridge between the TLDM's RJ45 ports and the VDM ports to distribute Voice (telephone) service to specific residential data port outlets. Telephone handsets can then be plugged into the data port to which a jumper cable has been connected.

Some thoughts and questions follow:
- Its important that your prior telephone service be disconnected from whatever telephone line (1, 2, 3 or 4) which you plan to use for the OOMA Telo phone service. If you connect the OOMA Telo to a telephone line which is still connected to a telephone service it probably wont' work correctly and you risk damaging the Telo device.

- If you are simply using one telephone line which is being provided by the OOMA Telo device and you don't have a security system, then you don't need to split open a cable between the OOMA Telo and punch down its wires on to the TLDM. You can simply plug a telephone phone cord (probably an RJ11) from the OOMA Telo into one of the unused TLDM's 1,2,3,4 RJ45 ports. For this configuration, I recommend that you use one of the "two-wire" phone handset cords (it only has the center two electrical connectors). This will connect the OOMA Telo's single phone service line to Line-1 within the TLDM. Then you can simply use Cat-5e jumper cables to bridge between the TLDM's RJ45 ports and the VDM ports for specific residential data port outlets.

In our installation, I use the Modem->Router->OOMA-Telo configuration. The Modem and Router are co-located with the two SMC's. I have data ports installed in pairs throughout the residence and I can deploy the OOMA-Telo to any of these locations. I use one data port to provide an Internet data connection from the router to the OOMA-Telo's "To Internet" port. I connect the OOMA-Telo's "Phone" port to the second data port using an RJ11 telephone handset cord to connect the OOMA-Telo's "Phone" port back to one of the VDM ports in the SMC. I then use an RJ45 Cat-5e patch cable to connect the VDM port to one of the unused TLDM's 1,2.3,4 RJ45 telephone distribution ports which completes the connection to all other configured phone outlets in the residence. The OOMA-Telo's "Home Network" and "Wall" ports are unused. By moving the OOMA Telo into the residence it makes its touch pad available to fully utilize its functionality and it has the additional
benefit of separating the Telo from the wireless router to avoid wireless signalling conflicts to which the Telo seems to be vulnerable.

- If you currently have a security system or plan to add one in the future (and you want to try to use the OOMA Telo phone line for the security system) you will probably want to punch down the OOMA Telo phone line on to your TLDM incoming telephone service connector to take advantage of the security system over-ride logic. Some people have struggled to get their security systems working with OOMA's VOIP which is why I put part of the previous sentence in brackets. The way I would approach this would be to punch one end of a Cat-5e jumper cable down on the TLDM's incoming phone service block and then plug the other end into the VDM port for the OOMA Telo location.

- If you plan to keep a POTS (plane old telephone service) line in combination with the OOMA Telo VOIP service, then its important that you accurately punch down the wires for the telephone services on their respective ports within the TLDM. Some people choose to keep a low cost POTS line for the combination of fax services and security systems. You also need to decide which telephone lines (line 1 or 2) are used for each service and then configure all connected devices and the patch panel appropriately.

- If you aren't familiar with all of the above discussion and with telephone wiring in general (i.e., which pairs of wires are used for which phone lines) then you might want to seek some professional help with the wiring and patch panel configuration
#111108 by RelaxEric
Thu Jun 20, 2013 3:54 pm
I also needed to connect the Ooma Telo to our patch panel. I cut a regular phone line cord and tried to patch the four wires onto the punch down block (after removing wires from existing service), but the wires were very thin and the insulation was very tough. Since the wire insulation colors from the phone cord didn't match the existing wire colors, I Googled "telephone wire color" and found this post http://communities.leviton.com/thread/2368 that explains what colors are equivalent. This might have worked if I had a punch down tool, but the wires aren't really meant for this and might not have made the best connection.

But without a punch down tool the wires probably weren't seated properly in the block and I never got a dial tone. I went to Home Depot to see if they had something for this purpose - Cat3 cable with a phone plug or jack on one end and bare wires on the other. The first sales associate didn't know what a punch down tool was (I admit I only knew they existed at this point), but another associate helped me get the parts I needed. I bought:
1) 4 feet of Cat3 wire. These wires are solid copper and meant to be put in the punch down block. Cheap.
2) Voice Grade Jack. This is a phone jack (female) with a punch down block on the back for attaching the wires. Cheap.
3) Phone line cord. Cheap.
4) Punch down tool. Home Depot's cheapest was $23. Wanted to spend less, but called Radio Shack and they didn't have one, and Lowes had one about the same price.

It would have been nice if they had a phone plug that could be wired to a Cat3 cable, but the plugs they had in a package were small and we couldn't figure out how you wired them. Then I wouldn't have needed the phone line cord to connect the phone jack to the Telo.

The jack was easy to wire with the punch down tool and the color codes on it. The other end was easy to wire into the patch panel with the punch down tool. The colors in the new wire matched the existing wiring and so I didn't have to think about it. The phone line cord connects the Telo to the newly wired phone jack and we now have the Ooma Telo dial tone throughout the house. Just wish I didn't have to buy the $23 punch down tool that I may never need again.
#111145 by highq
Fri Jun 21, 2013 1:36 pm
Whenever I didn't have a punchdown tool at hand, I could always manage with a pair of needle-nose pliers.
#111317 by RelaxEric
Wed Jun 26, 2013 7:19 am
It's good to know needlenose pliers work in a pinch. I was so eager to get it working right that I didn't want to leave the store without everything I needed. I see Amazon has the "DataShark 70034 110 Non-Impact Punchdown Tool" for about $6. Wish I had had ordered that before my number ported.

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