Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#80186 by jamgold
Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:23 pm
tomcat wrote:I, too, would recommend putting your telo behind your router. However, you may need to configure QoS in your router to prioritize the ooma traffic. The QoS settings should help to clear up your voice quality.


I have a DLink which provides for QOS, but I was no't able to configure it accordingly. Since voice quality was unacceptable I decided to kick out the router.
#80187 by thunderbird
Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:37 pm
More Discussion:
jamgold wrote:
thunderbird wrote:Some thoughts and Ideas:
Are you worried that there would be increased security risk with the web server as the DMZ IP address? There would be no security risk difference between connecting modem-hub-web server computer, or connecting modem-Ooma-Hub-web server computer with the web server's computer IP number in the Ooma's DMZ.

jamgold wrote:Oh yes there would be. My computer has many more ports open that I do NOT want to expose to the internet.

jamgold you have to give this some thought:
If you had your web server computer connected directly to your modem, the only thing that protects your computer's ports is good Firewall/virus software installed on your web server computer.

If you had your web server computer connected directly to the hub, than to your modem, the only thing that protects your computer's ports is good Firewall/virus software installed on your web server computer.

If you had your web server computer connected directly to the hub than to the Ooma device with the web server's IP address placed in the Ooma device's DMZ, than connected to your modem, the only thing that protects your computer's ports is good Firewall/virus software installed on your web server computer.

The security exposure is exactly the same for all three examples.

thunderbird wrote:The hub has more limited function and could cause Ooma to limit port forwarding?

jamgold wrote:No, a hub has no such limiting function since it does NOT work on TCP/IP level.

The hub is a "dumb" device which does still pass TCP and UDP protocols. The difference is that the hub will send/receive all information to all connected computers/devices, where a switch will send/receive information to/from only one computer/device. Sending/recieving information to/from all computers can "confuse" a device like the Ooma.

thunderbird wrote:You could connect your Ooma device behind the hub if you have an extra port. I have my Ooma device behind my router and it works fine that way. If you had to, you could purchase a switch so you would have enough LAN ports. But if you go that far, it would probably be better to purchase a router which would provide more security.

jamgold wrote:I used to have my Ooma Telo behind my router, but that resulted in unacceptable voice quality. I finally removed the Router from the equation because I believed the advertised features of Ooma, which doesn't really require me to have a Router. Voice quality is acceptable now, but the port forwarding / DMZ situation is unacceptable now.

When you were using your router with the Ooma device connected behind the router, did you reserve an IP address to the Ooma device in your router, than place the Ooma device's IP address in you router's DMZ. That action would have corrected your QoS problems, with the same level of security risk for the Ooma device, that are in the first three examples above. Having the router in the mix would provide the best security for the web server computer. Having good firewall/virus software installed on you web server computer, and along with using the router would almost be like having double security.
#80194 by nn5i
Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:07 pm
thunderbird wrote:... than place the Ooma device's IP address in you router's DMZ.

Thunderbird, please forgive me in advance. I wanted to use PM, but you don't have PM turned on. Please find a good dictionary and look up the words "then", "than", and "you" and "your". I find your posts interesting, informative, and useful; but you use these words very often, and almost always get them wrong. Drives me batty trying to read. Again, forgive me; I would avoid giving offense if I could, but I don't know how to do that and still give you the help I think you could use.
#80217 by jamgold
Mon Apr 25, 2011 6:13 am
thunderbird wrote:When you were using your router with the Ooma device connected behind the router, did you reserve an IP address to the Ooma device in your router, than place the Ooma device's IP address in you router's DMZ. That action would have corrected your QoS problems, with the same level of security risk for the Ooma device, that are in the first three examples above. Having the router in the mix would provide the best security for the web server computer. Having good firewall/virus software installed on you web server computer, and along with using the router would almost be like having double security.


Thank you thunderbird

According to Ooma setup instructions, the service is supposed to work without a router. The Ooma Telo software provides for port forwarding. Is it too much to ask how/if this feature works?
#80220 by EA PA
Mon Apr 25, 2011 6:50 am
nn5i wrote:
thunderbird wrote:... than place the Ooma device's IP address in you router's DMZ.

Thunderbird, please forgive me in advance. I wanted to use PM, but you don't have PM turned on. Please find a good dictionary and look up the words "then", "than", and "you" and "your". I find your posts interesting, informative, and useful; but you use these words very often, and almost always get them wrong. Drives me batty trying to read. Again, forgive me; I would avoid giving offense if I could, but I don't know how to do that and still give you the help I think you could use.


I knew it... hot button LOL :D :D :D
#80222 by nn5i
Mon Apr 25, 2011 6:55 am
EA PA wrote:I knew it... hot button LOL :D :D :D

Yeah -- those things absolutely jump out at me and stop me in my tracks. Occasionally I wish they didn't -- but only occasionally.
#80224 by EA PA
Mon Apr 25, 2011 7:05 am
nn5i wrote:
EA PA wrote:I knew it... hot button LOL :D :D :D

Yeah -- those things absolutely jump out at me. Occasionally I wish they didn't -- but only occasionally.


Based upon the looks of you’re tricked out OOMA setup, I can see another nn5i hot button: Unwanted call intruders...
#80226 by nn5i
Mon Apr 25, 2011 7:18 am
EA PA wrote:Based upon the looks of [your] tricked out OOMA setup, I can see another nn5i hot button: Unwanted call intruders...

You got that one right. I designed and built that stuff and first placed it in service in October of 2008, and life became much pleasanter. I was getting as many as ten calls daily from telemarketers, from charities, and from the Democratic and Republican parties. Immediately that dropped to one per month, usually none; and never twice from the same caller.
#80231 by EA PA
Mon Apr 25, 2011 7:38 am
nn5i wrote:
EA PA wrote:Based upon the looks of [your] tricked out OOMA setup, I can see another nn5i hot button: Unwanted call intruders...

You got that one right. I designed and built that stuff and first placed it in service in October of 2008, and life became much pleasanter. I was getting as many as ten calls daily from telemarketers, from charities, and from the Democratic and Republican parties. Immediately that dropped to one per month, usually none; and never twice from the same caller.


Arghh! Yet another casualty of MSW spell and grammar check. I was trying to lower your BP and use tools, so much for that.

If we could only screen the political parties out, I am sure that 90% of the unwanted calls would disappear. So far, I find the best approach to avoid the unwanted calls is the bob and weave technique. By changing phone numbers frequently and informing only the EA PA inner circle of trust, I avoid most of the riffraff.

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