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#5716 by HeidiLouH
Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:40 am
I purchased OOMA, and was very happy until I realized my cable router is no where near a phone line. I purchased a Scout so that my TIVO and DISH DVRs could dial-in to get their lineup (not to mention wanting phone service throughout my home, not just with my wireless phones, wanting the second line, etc, etc). After fretting for a month, because I was porting my main number over, I just read about HomePlug devices.

I decided to purchase a NETGEAR XE102G Up to 14Mbps Powerline. I was curious if anyone has used OOMA with a HomePlug device and if there is anything special I should know about setting it up?

I've searched through the Knowledgebase and here but can't find much information on it - and I am not extremely tech savvy.

Thank you.
#5719 by oomg
Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:49 am
Within the next few days, I will be installing a similar product: Monster Powernet 200

Looks like it will do the job, but I will report by way of an update once it is operational.

oomg
#5767 by koehn
Wed Apr 01, 2009 5:43 pm
I used one briefly, but then re-wired. My main concern was that they were limiting my bandwidth (17mbps downloads), hence the re-wire. Other than that they worked as advertised.

I had the "200mbps" versions, but like I said the actual throughput is nowhere near 200mbps.

One thing, though: you need to make sure that all the plugs you use come off the same side of your breaker box, otherwise you'll have problems, as the two sides don't share the same 110V supply, and thus the devices won't be able to network.
#5770 by HeidiLouH
Wed Apr 01, 2009 6:29 pm
koehn wrote:One thing, though: you need to make sure that all the plugs you use come off the same side of your breaker box, otherwise you'll have problems, as the two sides don't share the same 110V supply, and thus the devices won't be able to network.


Very good point - I am glad you mentioned it. I sure hope the two outlets I want to use are on the same circuit.
#5802 by dawg86
Thu Apr 02, 2009 11:34 am
I just completed such an install yesterday, because I did not have a cable modem connection and phone line in close proximity to each other. I used the ActionTec homeplugs in the following manner:

Modem>wireless router>homeplug>homeplug>ooma hub

I am up and running just fine with this setup.

As another writer mentioned, the key is to find two plugs in your house that are on the same "circuit" (I'm not an electrician, so I may have that terminology wrong). It is well documented that homeplugs don't "jump circuits" well - and in my case, I spent a couple of hours trying to find a pair of outlets that provide the necessary throughput to support the homeplug lan connection. I used my an online speedtest to find the pair with the optimal throughput.

Bottom line: it can be done, just put in the effort to find two well matched locations in your home.
#5806 by HeidiLouH
Thu Apr 02, 2009 12:14 pm
dawg86 wrote:I spent a couple of hours trying to find a pair of outlets that provide the necessary throughput to support the homeplug lan connection. I used my an online speedtest to find the pair with the optimal throughput.

Bottom line: it can be done, just put in the effort to find two well matched locations in your home.


Perhaps once I start attempting to put this together I will understand how to find the best pair for optimal throughput. Which online speedtest did you utilize?

Thanks for your response.
#5886 by koehn
Fri Apr 03, 2009 12:04 pm
In the US, most houses are wired with two separate 110V supply lines which are out of phase. A "220V" device like a dryer is really just receiving both 110V supplies (which have a 220V potential between them).

In your breaker box, there are typically two columns of breakers, one on the left, one on the right. If you opened up your box (which I don't recommend unless you know what you're doing), you'd see each column is wired to one of the 110V supply lines coming into your house, after passing through the main breaker.

Anyway, since the home networking devices use the power line to transmit their signal, and roughly half of the circuits in your house are on separate power lines, there's a roughly 50:50 chance your devices will be able to talk to one another. You can easily figure this out ahead of time by figuring out which circuits control the outlets you want to use for networking, and verifying that they're in the same column on your breaker box.

Last word of advice: plug those devices right into the wall: they don't work at all if you plug them into a surge suppressor.
#5887 by HeidiLouH
Fri Apr 03, 2009 12:06 pm
It worked!! I am so thrilled, relieved, exhausted! Ha!
I was able to create an outlet by my computer (so many outlets were already in use) by moving stuff around, then plugged in to the outlet I wanted to utilize in the kitchen and it worked!

Now I have to tackle the Scout (which I truly hope is plug-and-play).
#5895 by murphy
Fri Apr 03, 2009 12:58 pm
koehn wrote:In your breaker box, there are typically two columns of breakers, one on the left, one on the right. If you opened up your box (which I don't recommend unless you know what you're doing), you'd see each column is wired to one of the 110V supply lines coming into your house, after passing through the main breaker.

Not true. The top breaker of each column is on the same phase. The second breaker of each column is on the other phase. This alternates all of the way down the panel as long as no half width breakers are installed.
Take a look at the breaker for any 240 volt appliance. It is a dual breaker using adjacent breakers in the same column. Also nominal USA power is 120 volts and 240 volts.

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